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B.C. Reg. 296/97
Workers' Compensation Board
Deposited September 8, 1997
effective April 15, 1998
This consolidation is current to August 31, 2021.
See the Cumulative B.C. Regulations Bulletin 2021
for amendments effective after August 31, 2021.
Link to consolidated regulation (PDF)
Link to Point in Time

Workers Compensation Act

Occupational Health and Safety Regulation

[Last amended July 14, 2020 by B.C. Reg. 82/2020]

Contents
Part 1 — Definitions
1.1Definitions
Part 2 — Application
2.1Scope of application
2.2General duty
2.3Conflict with a code or standard
2.4Compliance
2.5Inspection reports
2.6Notification of compliance
2.7Notice to workers
2.8Contravention
Part 3 — Rights and Responsibilities
Occupational Health and Safety Programs
3.1When program required
3.2Small operations
3.3Contents of program
3.4Repealed
Workplace Inspections
3.5General requirement
3.6Repealed
3.7Special inspections
3.8Committee participation
Correction of Unsafe Conditions
3.9Remedy without delay
3.10Reporting unsafe conditions
3.11Emergency circumstances
Refusal of Unsafe Work
3.12Procedure for refusal
3.13No discriminatory action
Occupational First Aid
3.14Definitions
3.15First aid attendant qualifications
3.16Basic requirements
3.17First aid procedures
3.17.1Air transportation
3.18Communication and availability
3.19First aid records
3.20Multiple employer workplaces
3.21First aid attendant responsibilities
Young or New Workers
3.22Definitions
3.23Young or new worker orientation and training
3.24Additional orientation and training
3.25Documentation
Joint Health and Safety Committees
3.26Evaluation of joint committees
3.27Minimum training requirements for new joint committee members or worker health and safety representatives
Participation in Investigations
3.28Participation by employer or representative of employer and worker representative
Schedule 3-A
Part 4 — General Conditions
Buildings, Structures and Equipment
4.1Safe workplace
4.1.1Avalanche risk assessment and safety plan
4.1.2Avalanche risk assessment and safety plan exception
4.2Safe buildings and structures
4.3Safe machinery and equipment
4.4Conformity to standards
4.5Manuals and information
4.6Reassembly
4.7Information on rated capacity
4.8Rated capacity
4.9Inspection and maintenance records
4.10Authorization
4.11Startup
4.12Circumvention of safeguards
Emergency Preparedness and Response
4.13Risk assessment
4.14Emergency procedures
4.15Repealed
4.16Training
4.17Notification of fire departments
4.18Notification of utility service providers
Impairment
4.19Physical or mental impairment
4.20Impairment by alcohol, drug or other substance
Working Alone or in Isolation
4.20.1Definition
4.20.2Hazard identification, elimination and control
4.21Procedures for checking well-being of worker
4.22Training
4.22.1Late night retail safety procedures and requirements
4.22.2Mandatory prepayment for fuel
4.23Annual review of procedures
Workplace Conduct
4.24Definition
4.25Prohibition
4.26Investigation
Violence in the Workplace
4.27Definition
4.28Risk assessment
4.29Procedures and policies
4.30Instruction of workers
4.31Advice to consult physician
Work Area Requirements
4.32Access to work areas
4.33Arrangement of work areas
4.34Restricted entry
4.35Door installations
4.36Glass
4.37Restricted visibility
4.38Extreme temperatures
4.39Slipping and tripping hazards
4.40Wet floors
4.41Waste material
4.42Cleaning with compressed air
Storing and Handling Materials
4.43Stacking materials
4.43.1Storage racks
4.44Entrapment
4.45Falling materials
Ergonomics (MSI) Requirements
4.46Definition
4.47Risk identification
4.48Risk assessment
4.49Risk factors
4.50Risk control
4.51Education and training
4.52Evaluation
4.53Consultation
Work Area Guards and Handrails
4.54Definitions
4.55Guardrail locations
4.56Exceptions
4.57Elevated workers
4.58Specifications for guards and guardrails
4.58.1Temporary removal of guardrails
4.59Floor and roof openings
4.60Toeboards
4.61Walkways
4.62Handrails on stairways
4.63Vehicle travel areas
Illumination
4.64Definitions
4.65Illumination levels
Table 4-1: Illumination levels for task categories
4.66Means of illumination
4.67Brightness, reflectance and glare
4.68Illumination measurement
4.69Emergency lighting
Indoor Air Quality
4.70Application
4.71Submitting plans
4.72Design and operation
4.73Building modifications
4.74Distribution
4.75Balancing
4.76Ventilation openings
4.77Discharged air
4.78Preventive maintenance
4.79Investigation
4.80Temperature and humidity
Environmental Tobacco Smoke and E-Cigarette Vapour
4.80.1Definitions
4.81Controlling exposure
4.82Exceptions
4.83Repealed
Occupational Environment Requirements
4.84Eating areas
4.85Washroom facilities
4.86Change areas
4.87Unsafe water
4.88-
4.106
Repealed
Schedule 4-A
Part 5 — Chemical Agents and Biological Agents
5.1Definitions
5.1.1Designation as hazardous substances
5.2General information requirement
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
5.3Application
5.4Prohibition
5.5WHMIS program
5.6Worker education
5.7Worker training
5.8Supplier label
5.9Workplace label for employer-produced products
5.10Workplace label for decanted products
5.11Piping systems and vessels
5.12Placard identifiers
5.13Laboratory label
5.14Supplier SDS
5.15Employer SDS
5.16Availability of an SDS
5.16.1Availability of toxicological data
5.17Deletions from an SDS
5.18Confidential business information and claims for exemption under the HMIRA
5.19Repealed
Containers and Storage
5.20Condition of containers
5.21Material integrity
5.22Covers
5.23Permitted quantities
5.24Incompatible substances
5.25Storage practices
5.26Storage area
Flammable and Combustible Substances
5.27Ignition sources
5.28Grounding or bonding
5.29Electrostatic charge
5.30Dispensing
5.31Flammable gas or vapour
5.32Manual cleaning
5.33Permitted quantities
5.34Combustible materials
5.35Cabinet vent
Substances Under Pressure
5.36Containers
5.37Pressure testing
5.38Handling and securing cylinders
5.39Cylinder markings
5.40Cylinder valves
5.41Fittings
5.42Repealed
5.43Empty cylinders
5.44Acetylene cylinders
5.45Restriction on use of copper
5.46Restriction on use of oxygen
5.47Cleanliness
Controlling Exposure
5.48Exposure limits
5.49Excursion limits
5.50Extended work periods
5.51Additive effects
5.52Skin designation
5.53Workplace monitoring
5.54Exposure control plan
5.55Type of controls
5.56Oxygen deficiency
5.57Designated substances
5.58Protective policy
5.59Investigating symptoms
Ventilation
5.60Application
5.61Engineering principles
5.62Submitting plans
5.63Building modifications
5.64Controlling air contaminants
5.65Worker location
5.66Ventilation openings
5.67Effectiveness
5.68Failure warning
5.69Makeup air
5.70Discharged air
Table 5-1: Recirculation of discharged air
5.71Flammable air contaminants
Internal Combustion Engines
5.72Venting outdoors
5.73Indoor operation
5.74Emission controls
5.75Mobile equipment emission controls
Hazardous Wastes and Emissions
5.76Label
5.77Placard
5.78SDS
5.79Sale or disposal
5.80Sharp-edged waste
5.81Combustible dust
Personal Hygiene
5.82Employer's responsibility
5.83Worker's responsibility
5.84Prohibition
Emergency Washing Facilities
5.85Where required
5.86Water supply
5.87Access
5.88Risk assessment
5.89Equipment required
5.90Transient worksites
5.91Remote worksites
5.92Signs
5.93Testing
5.94Training
5.95Protection from freezing
Table 5-2: Risk assessment
Table 5-3: Provision and location of emergency washing equipment
5.96Valve operation
Emergency Procedures
5.97Emergency plan
5.98Inventory
5.99Risk assessment
5.100Procedures for evacuation
5.101Procedures for spill cleanup and re-entry
5.102Training and drills
Table 5-4: Repealed
Part 6 — Substance Specific Requirements
Asbestos
6.1Definitions
6.2Application
General Requirements
6.3Exposure control plan
6.4Inventory
6.5Identification
6.6Assessment and classification
6.7Control of asbestos fibre
6.8Procedures
6.9Prohibitions
6.10Substitution
6.11Instruction and training
6.12Monitoring
Designated Work Areas and Containments
6.13Designated area
6.14Permanent enclosure design
6.15Glove bags
6.16High risk work
Ventilation
6.17Containment ventilation
6.18Local exhaust ventilation
6.19Filter testing
Other Means of Controlling Exposure to Asbestos
6.20Protecting work surfaces
6.21Preventing spread
6.22Wetting material
6.23Repairing damaged material
6.24Friction materials
Waste Handling and Disposal
6.25Sealed containers
6.26Cleaning containers and equipment
6.27Waste removal
6.28Waste disposal
Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment
6.29Respiratory protection
6.30Protective clothing
6.31Information to laundry workers
Documentation
6.32Retention of records
Biological Agents
6.33Definitions
6.34Exposure control plan
6.35Repealed
6.36Controls
6.37Labels and identification
6.38Repealed
6.39Vaccination
6.40Medical evaluation
6.41Repealed
Cytotoxic Drugs
6.42Definition
6.43Exposure control plan
6.44Information
6.45Labels
6.46Signs
6.47List
6.48Procedures
6.49Reproductive toxins
6.50Instruction
6.51Supervision
6.52Records
6.53Drug preparation and administration
6.54Disconnects
6.55Personal protective equipment
6.56Personal hygiene
6.57Waste disposal
6.58Spills
Lead
6.58.1Definitions
6.59Application
6.59.1Risk assessment
6.60Exposure control plan
6.60.1Elimination or control of exposure
6.61Air monitoring for lead
6.61.1Exceptions to air monitoring requirement
6.62Warning signs
6.63Personal hygiene
6.64Housekeeping
6.65Prohibited cleaning methods
6.66Instruction and training
6.67Health protection
6.68Records
6.69Primary lead smelters
Pesticides
6.70Definitions
6.71Application
General Requirements
6.72Pesticide labels
6.73Labels and signs for treated materials
6.74Pesticide use
6.75SDS
6.76Informing workers
Mixing, Loading and Applying Pesticides
6.77Qualifications
6.78Procedures
6.79Health protection
6.80Rescue
Equipment
6.81General requirements
6.82Fixed stations
6.83Mobile equipment
Pesticide Application
6.84Safe application practice
6.85Posting warning signs
6.86Design of warning signs
6.87Warning signs for non-fumigants
6.88Warning signs for fumigants
6.89Restricted entry intervals
6.90Authorization to enter
6.91Exemptions
6.92Cleanup of residues
6.93Pesticide drift
6.94Records
Personal Hygiene
6.95Wash and shower facilities
6.96Worker cleanup
6.97Personal protective clothing and equipment
Avicides, Predicides, Rodenticides and Insecticidal Baits
6.98Exemption
6.99Preventive measures
Storage
6.100Location
6.101Storage facilities
6.102Retail displays
Antisapstain Applications
6.103Substitution
6.104Ventilation
6.105Cleaning equipment
6.106Excess chemical
6.107Protective clothing
6.108Records
6.109Exemption
Respirable Crystalline Silica and Rock Dust
6.110Definitions
6.111Application
6.112Risk assessment
6.112.1Exposure control plan
6.112.2Elimination or control of exposure
6.112.3Air monitoring for RCS dust
6.112.4Exceptions to monitoring requirement
6.112.5Blasting enclosures
6.112.6Housekeeping
6.112.7Instruction and training
6.113Rock drills
6.114Crushing plants
6.115Asphalt mixing plants
6.115.1Application of RCS dust provisions
Toxic Process Gases
6.116Definitions
6.117Application
6.118Risk assessment
6.119Exposure control plan
6.120Procedures
6.121Education and training
6.122Enclosure
6.123Testing
6.124Ventilation
6.125Emergency ventilation
6.126Shut-down device
6.127Personal protective equipment
6.128Monitors and alarms
6.129Pressure relief alarm systems
6.130Identification of controls
6.131Piping systems
6.132Maintenance
Part 7 — Noise, Vibration, Radiation and Temperature
Division 1 — Noise Exposure
7.1Definition
7.2Noise exposure limits
7.3Noise measurement required
7.4Exemption
7.5Noise control and hearing conservation program
7.6Engineered noise control
7.7Hearing protection and warning signs
7.8Hearing tests
7.9Records to be kept
Division 2 — Vibration Exposure
7.10Definitions
7.11Vibration exposure limits
7.12Evaluation of vibration
7.13Vibration exposure control obligations
7.14Information about vibration hazards
7.15Labels
7.16Exposure to cold and hand-arm vibration
Division 3 — Radiation Exposure
7.17Definitions
7.18Application
7.19Exposure limits
7.20Exposure control plan
7.21Reproductive hazards
7.22Monitoring exposure
7.23Standards for use of equipment
7.24Radiation surveys
7.25Records
Division 4 — Thermal Exposure
7.26Definitions
Heat Exposure
7.27Application
7.28Exposure limits
7.29Heat stress assessment and exposure control plan
7.30Heat stress controls
7.31Provision of water
7.32Removal from and treatment for heat exposure
Cold Exposure
7.33Application
7.34Cold stress assessment and exposure control plan
7.35Cold stress controls
7.36Heated shelters
7.37Clothing and personal protective equipment
7.38Removal and treatment
Part 8 — Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment
8.1Definitions
General Requirements
8.2Responsibility to provide
8.3Selection, use and maintenance
8.4Workplace evaluation
8.5Program
8.6Annual review
8.7Instruction
8.8Supervisor's responsibilities
8.9Worker's responsibilities
8.10Personal clothing and accessories
Safety Headgear
8.11General requirement
8.12Use with all-terrain vehicles, snowmobiles and motorcycles
8.13Use with bicycles and skates
Eye and Face Protection
8.14Eye protection
8.15Glass lenses
8.16Side protection
8.17Face protection
8.18Repealed
Limb and Body Protection
8.19General requirement
8.20Cleaning or replacement
8.21Leg protection
Footwear
8.22General requirement
8.23Slippery surfaces
High Visibility and Distinguishing Apparel
8.24High visibility apparel
8.25Distinguishing apparel
Buoyancy Equipment
8.26When required
8.27Compliance with standards
8.28Working alone
8.29Record of inspection and maintenance
8.30Retroreflective material
Flame Resistant Clothing
8.31When required
Respirators
8.32When respirator required
8.33Selection
8.34Maximum use concentration
Table 8-1: Respirator protection factors
8.35IDLH or oxygen deficient atmosphere
8.36Emergency escape respirators
8.37Respirable air quality
8.38Corrective eyewear
8.39Face seal
8.40Fit tests
8.41User seal check
8.42Medical assessment
8.43Optional use
8.44Records
8.45Maintenance and inspections
Schedule 8-A
Part 9 — Confined Spaces
9.1Definitions
General Requirements
9.2Initial determination
9.3Prohibited entry
9.4Control of hazards
9.5Confined space entry program
Responsibilities
9.6Administration
9.7Supervision
9.8Instruction
Hazard Assessment and Work Procedures
9.9Hazard assessment
9.10Procedures
9.11Qualifications
Identification and Entry Permits
9.12Identification
9.13When permits required
9.14Contents of permit
9.15Updating the information
9.16Record of permit
Lockout and Control of Harmful Substances
9.17Lockout
9.18Control of harmful substance in adjacent piping
9.18.1Repealed
9.19Isolation points
9.20Blanks and blinds
9.21Double block and bleed
9.22Alternative measures of control or isolation of adjacent piping
9.23Discharge area
Verification and Testing
9.24Verifying all precautions
9.25Testing the atmosphere
9.26Procedures and equipment
Cleaning, Purging, Venting and Inerting
9.27Cleaning, purging and venting
9.28Risk control
9.29Inerting
Ventilation
9.30Continuous ventilation
9.31Low hazard atmospheres
9.32Mechanical ventilation
9.33Natural ventilation
Standby Persons
9.34Low hazard atmosphere
9.35Moderate hazard atmosphere
9.36High hazard atmosphere, engulfment or entrapment
Rescue
9.37Provision of rescue services
9.38Equipment and training
9.39Notification
9.40Summoning rescue
9.41Rescue procedures
Lifelines, Harnesses and Lifting Equipment
9.42When required
9.43Standards
9.44Line entanglement
9.45Additional workers
Personal Protective Equipment and Other Precautions
9.46Repealed
9.47Emergency escape respirator
9.48Compressed gas cylinders
9.49Torches and hoses
9.50Electrical equipment
9.51Non-sparking tools
Part 10 — De-energization and Lockout
10.1Definitions
10.2General requirement
10.3When lockout required
10.4Lockout procedures
10.5Access to energy isolating devices
10.6Checking locked out equipment
10.7Worker responsibilities
10.8Removal of locks
10.9Group lockout procedure
10.10Alternative procedures
10.11Locks not required
10.12Work on energized equipment
Part 11 — Fall Protection
11.1Definitions
11.2Obligation to use fall protection
11.3Fall protection plan
11.4Selection of harness or belt
11.5Equipment standards
11.6Anchors
11.7Temporary horizontal lifelines
11.8Certification by engineer
11.9Inspection and maintenance
11.10Removal from service
11.11-
11.40
Repealed
Part 12 — Tools, Machinery and Equipment
12.1Definitions
General Requirements
12.2Safeguarding requirement
12.3Standards
12.4Effectiveness of safeguards
12.5Fixed guards
12.6Lubrication
12.7Repealed
12.8Repealed
12.9Repealed
12.10Identifying unsafe equipment
12.11Operating controls
12.12Machinery location
12.13Marking physical hazards
12.14Identification of piping
12.15Restraining devices
Guarding Mechanical Power Transmission Parts
12.16Rotating hazards
12.17Gears and sprockets
12.18Reciprocating machinery
12.19Drive belts
12.20Reaching up
12.21Flywheels and pulleys
Conveyors
12.22Standards
12.23Belt-type conveyors
12.24Screw-type conveyors
12.25Feed points
12.26Repealed
12.27Falling materials
12.28Emergency stopping devices
Power Presses, Brake Presses and Shears
12.29Standards
12.30Point of operation safeguarding
12.31Exception for custom work
12.32Supervisory control
12.33Repealed
Feed-rolls and Metal-forming Rolls
12.34Feed-rolls
12.35Guard design
12.36Metal-forming rolls
Machine Tools
12.37Splash guards and shields
12.38Lathe chucks
12.39Restriction on hand polishing
12.40Stock projection
12.41Shapers/planers
12.42Carriage travel
12.43Vertical boring mills
Abrasive Equipment
12.44Standards
12.45Protective hood
12.46Speed of abrasive wheels
12.47Grinding prohibitions
12.48Work rests
12.49Dust control
12.50Repealed
Powder Actuated Tools
12.51Standards
12.52Tool selection
12.53Tool design
12.54Markings
12.55Storage
12.56Tool use
12.57Limitations on use
Woodworking Tools and Equipment
12.58Hand feeding
12.59Removing guards
12.60Kickback fingers, splitters and spreaders
12.61Radial arm saw travel limits
12.62Jointers
12.63Sanding machines
12.64Tenoning machines
12.65Hand-held circular saws
12.66Cutting heads
12.67Band saws
Mobile Chippers
12.68Hand-fed chippers
12.69Self-feeding chippers
12.70Driven-feed chippers
12.71Vertically fed chippers
Chain Saws
12.72Standards
12.73Stopping chain movement
Automotive Lifts and Other Vehicle Supports
12.74Standards
12.75Assembly and installation
12.76Operation
12.77Records
12.78Inspection and testing
12.79Rated capacity
12.80Controls
12.80.1Vehicle restraint
12.80.2Swing-arm restraint
Miscellaneous Equipment
12.81Tumblers
12.82Pneumatic nailing and stapling tools
12.83Industrial robots
12.83.1Chassis dynamometers — motor vehicle testing
Drilling Rock or Similar Materials
12.84General requirement
12.85Drilling equipment
12.86Control location
12.87Boom hazard
12.88Drill jumbos
12.89Drilling procedures
12.90Rod handling
12.91Self-propelled drills
12.92Cleaning drilled holes
Breaking and Melting Metal
12.93Breaking metal
12.94Inspection of linings
12.95Preventing eruptions
12.96Inspection of materials
Abrasive Blasting and High Pressure Washing
12.97Definitions
12.98Risk assessment
12.99Work procedures outside a cabinet
12.100Substitution
12.101Reuse prohibition
12.102Cleanup
12.103Engineering controls
12.104Exhaust ventilation
12.105Restricted work zones
12.106Operating controls
12.107Repealed
12.108Jetting gun
12.109Holding work
12.110Hose restraint
12.111Personal protective equipment
Welding, Cutting and Allied Processes
12.112Standards
12.113Repealed
12.114Ventilation
12.115Coatings on metals
12.116Flammable and explosive substances
12.117Silver solder
12.118Correct equipment
12.119Equipment inspection
12.120Flashback prevention
12.121Receptacles for stubs
12.122Radiation protection
12.123Protective clothing and equipment
12.124Respiratory protection
12.125Marking hot work
12.126Fire extinguishers
Painting, Coating and Work with Plastics and Resins
12.127Application
12.128Substitution
12.129Restrictions
12.130Warning signs
12.131Enclosure
12.132Air flow
12.133Control of ignition sources
12.134Arrester filters
12.135Respiratory protection
12.136Disposal of isocyanate containers
12.137Repealed
12.138Airless spray equipment
12.139Design for high pressure
12.140Heating plastics
12.141Resin foams
Laundry and Dry Cleaning Activities
12.142Definitions
Dry Cleaning
12.143Open cleaning prohibited
12.144Systems and equipment
12.145Equipment labels
12.146Solvent handling
12.147Bulk storage
12.148Machine ventilation
12.149General ventilation
12.150Inspection and repair
12.151Open flame heaters
12.152Combustion air supply
12.153Vents
12.154Servicing and maintenance
12.155Emergency ventilation
12.156Spotting chemicals
12.157Supplier responsibility
12.158Operator responsibility
Laundry Equipment
12.159Flatwork ironers
12.160Roller-type ironers
12.161Press-type ironers
12.162Interlocks
12.163Centrifugal extractors
12.164Laundry chutes
12.165Laundry carts
12.166Spillage
Rail Car Movement
12.167Application
12.168General requirements
12.169Clearance
12.170Riding restriction
12.171Brakes
12.172Tracks
Pressure Vessels
12.173Pressure relief device — when required
12.174Pressure relief device — installation
Roll-on/Roll-off Containers
12.175Definitions
12.176Container safety standard
12.177Protection against specified hazards
12.178Visual inspection before loading container onto vehicle
12.179Withdrawal from service
12.180Inspection following repair
12.181Periodic inspection
12.182Records of inspection
12.183Withdrawal from service following inspection
Part 13 — Ladders, Scaffolds and Temporary Work Platforms
Division 1 — General
13.1Definitions
13.2Standards
13.3Inspections
Division 2 — Ladders
13.4Manufactured ladders
13.5Position and stability
13.6Use restrictions
Division 3 — Work Platforms
13.7Access
13.8General requirements
13.9Lines supporting work platforms
13.10Hooks and clamps
13.11Engineering required
13.12Removal from service
Division 4 — Scaffolds
13.13Responsibilities
13.14Scaffold platforms
13.15Manufactured components
13.16Lumber for structural components
13.17Scaffold stability
13.18Connections
13.19Electrical hazards
Division 5 — Movable Work Platforms
13.20Marking of the equipment
13.21Manuals
13.22Maintenance of records
13.23Testing
13.24Work platforms on wheels
13.25Warning devices on elevating work platforms
13.26Controls on elevating work platforms
13.27Cranes and hoists used to suspend work platforms
13.28Two-blocking
13.29Hoisting and lowering work platforms
13.30Lift truck mounted work platforms
13.31Powered platforms
13.32Work in high risk situations
13.33Fall protection
Part 14 — Cranes and Hoists
14.1Definitions
14.1.1Application
General Requirements
14.2Standards
14.3Identification
14.4Repealed
14.5Rated capacity indication
14.6Repealed
14.7Boom angle indicator
14.8Boom extension and load radius indicators
14.9Logging exemption
14.10Reeved-in devices
14.11Support structure
14.12Manual and instructions
14.13Inspection, maintenance and repair
14.14Inspection and maintenance records
14.15Modifications
14.16Certification required
14.16.1Certification following misadventure
14.17Access and egress
14.18Audible warning
14.19Drop stops
14.20Rail end stops
14.21Fenders
14.22Securing pins
14.23Boom stops
14.24Molten metal
14.25Repealed
14.26Sheave guards
14.27Ungrounded supply
14.28Controls
14.29Operator protection
14.30Cab windows
14.31Operator's seat
14.32Storage
14.33Fire extinguisher
Equipment Operation
14.34Operator qualifications
14.34.1Operator certification
14.35Pre-use inspection
14.36Load weight
14.37Calibration
14.37.1Operator's duties
14.38Safe lifting
14.39Contact with loads and structures
14.40Swing and shear hazards
14.41Position of equipment
14.42Tandem lift
14.42.1Critical lift
14.43Travelling with a load
14.44Loads over work areas
14.45Unattended loads
14.46Vertical load line
14.47Signals
14.48Alternative to hand signals
14.49Dedicated radio system
14.49.1Communication between equipment operators
14.50Unhooking loads
14.51Riding hook or load
14.52Induced voltage
14.52.1Work near high voltage
14.53Repealed
Bridge, Gantry and Overhead Travelling Cranes
14.54Operational and running tests
14.54.1Detailed inspection
14.55Uptravel limit
14.56Electrical conductors
14.57Power shutoff
14.58Direction markings
Pneumatically Powered Hoists and Winches
14.59Pneumatically powered hoists
14.60Repealed
Manually Powered Hoists
14.61Brakes
14.62Crank handles
Mobile Cranes, Boom Trucks and Sign Trucks
14.63Repealed
14.64Load weight indicators
14.65Repealed
14.66Level turntable
14.67Outriggers and stabilizers
14.68Tires
14.69Supporting surface
14.70Travelling with a load
14.71Annual inspection
14.72Boom inspection
14.73Sign trucks
Tower Cranes
14.73.1Definition
14.73.2Tower crane erection
14.74Tower crane support
14.75Before use
14.76Identification
14.77Structural inspection
14.78Structures kept clean
14.79Manual and records
14.80Counterweights and ballasts
14.81Limit devices
14.82Test blocks
14.83Operator's cab
14.84Monitoring jib swing
14.84.1Overlapping operating zones
14.85Clearance and freedom to slew
14.86Repealed
14.87Repealed
14.88Access
14.89-
14.90
Repealed
14.91Hoisting ropes
14.92Wind limitations
14.93Temperature limitations
14.94-
14.95
Repealed
Construction Material Hoists
14.96Certifications and instructions
14.97Rider restriction
14.98Notices
14.99-
14.115
Repealed
Chimney Hoists
14.116Permission to use
14.117Certification
14.118Support structures
14.119Load rating
14.120-
14.132
Repealed
Schedule 14-A
Part 15 — Rigging
15.1Definitions
General Requirements
15.2Qualified riggers
15.3Detaching loads
15.4Use of rigging
15.5Component identification
15.6Design factors
Table 15-1: Minimum design factors for rigging
15.7Wire rope on mobile cranes
15.8Natural fibre rope
15.9Wedge socket connections
15.10Open hook restriction
15.11Securing pins
15.12Replacing pins
15.13Repealed
15.14Securing ropes to drums
15.15Wraps required
15.16Reeving lines
15.17Sheaves
15.18Guylines
15.19Spooling rope
15.20Hand signals
Figure 15-1: Standard hand signals for controlling crane operations-crawler, locomotive and truck cranes
15.21Termination efficiencies
Figure 15-2: Termination efficiencies
15.22Wire rope clips
15.23Wire rope splices
Table 15-2: Installation and use of wire rope clips
15.24Restriction on fold back eyes
15.25Wire rope rejection criteria
15.26Nonrotating wire rope
15.27Contact with electric arc
15.28Welding
15.29Hook rejection criteria
Slings
15.30Standards
15.31Inspection before use
15.32Makeshift fitting prohibition
15.33WLL of slings
15.34Sling angles
Table 15-3: WLL reductions for slings at an angle
15.35Repealed
15.36Proof-testing slings
15.37Storage
15.38Knots
15.39Sharp edges
15.40Slinging loads
15.41Multiple piece lifts
Wire Rope Slings
15.42Sling identification
15.43Rejection criteria
15.44Prohibited slings
15.45Temperature restrictions
Alloy Steel Chain Slings
15.46Sling identification
15.47Chain for hoisting
15.48Chain removal criteria
15.49Chain wear
Table 15-4: Allowable chain wear
15.50Periodic inspection
15.51Temperature restriction
Synthetic Web Slings
15.52Sling identification
15.53Temperature restriction
15.54Synthetic web sling rejection criteria
Figure 15-3: Examples of synthetic web sling rejection criteria
Metal Mesh Slings
15.55Sling identification
15.56Rejection criteria
Below-the-hook Lifting Devices
15.57Standards
15.58WLL
15.59Identification
15.60Part of lifted load
Part 16 — Mobile Equipment
16.1Definitions
General Requirements
16.2Application
16.3Operation and maintenance
16.4Competency of operators
16.5Operator's responsibility
16.6Supervisor's responsibility
16.7Standards
16.8Warning signal device — backup alarm
16.8.1Warning signal device — extended component
16.9Lights
16.10Rear view mirrors
16.11Window standards
16.12Maintenance
16.13Braking requirements
16.14Supplementary steering
16.15Steering wheel knobs
16.16Safe starting
16.17Escape from a cab
16.18Controls
16.19Load handling attachments
16.20Load ratings
Guards
16.21Protective structures
16.22Rollover protective structures
16.23ROPS standards
16.24ROPS certification
16.25ROPS identification
16.26Effect of ROPS on visibility
16.27Shear hazards
16.28Guarding moving parts
Seat Requirements and Rider Restrictions
16.29Operator's seat
16.30Restricted access
16.31Rider restriction
Seat Belts
16.32Provision
16.33Use
Operating Requirements
16.34Start of shift inspection
16.35Securing tools and equipment
16.36Unattended equipment
16.37Securing elevated loads
16.38Assistance on grades
16.39Swinging equipment
16.40Clearance
16.41Boarding/leaving
16.42Obstructed view
16.43Pedestrian and equipment traffic
16.44Securing loads
16.45Restraint for cylindrical objects
16.46Lift truck loads
Tire Servicing
16.47Training
16.48Equipment and procedures
All-terrain Vehicles
16.49Prohibited use
16.50Modifications
16.51Operator's manual
16.52Use on sloping ground
16.53Operator training
16.54Personal protective equipment
16.55Loading and unloading
Part 17 — Transportation of Workers
General Requirements
17.01Definitions
17.1Application
17.1.1General responsibilities
17.1.2Provision for seating and seat belt assemblies
17.2Employer's responsibility
17.2.1Operator responsibility
17.2.2General operation requirements
17.2.3Provision for seat belts
17.3Repealed
17.4Riding restrictions
17.5Securing equipment
17.5.1Gross vehicle weight rating
17.6Hazardous materials
17.7Carrying animals
17.8Passenger compartments
17.9Boarding and leaving
Worker Transportation Vehicles Not Designed for Use on Highways
17.10Vehicle design
17.11Repealed
17.12Seating design
17.13Seating capacity
17.14Aisles
Marine Craft
17.15Repealed
17.16Repealed
17.17Safety standards
17.18Operation
17.19-
17.21
Repealed
17.22Communication
17.23Vessel preparation
17.24Maintenance and inspection
17.25Anti-skid covering
17.26Lighting
Aircraft
17.27Repealed
Part 18 — Traffic Control
General Requirements
18.1Definitions
18.2Responsibility
18.3Standards for traffic control
18.4Supervision
18.5Placement of traffic control signs and devices
Traffic Control Persons (TCPs)
18.6Use of a traffic control person
18.7Traffic control person to remain on duty
18.8Location of traffic control persons
Equipment for Traffic Control Persons
18.9Operations during daytime
18.10Operations during nighttime or poor visibility
18.11Equipment maintenance
Directions and Signals by Traffic Control Persons
18.12Precise motions
18.13Standard signals between traffic control persons
18.14Standard signals for traffic
Other Requirements
18.15Dust control
18.16Long periods of delay
18.17Towing and recovery operations
Figure 18-1: Arm signals between traffic control persons
Figure 18-2: Arm signals for traffic control
Part 19 — Electrical Safety
19.1Definitions
General Electrical Requirements
19.2Repealed
19.3Poles and structures
19.4Obstructions on poles
19.5Informing workers
19.6Service rooms
19.7Space around equipment
19.8Testing equipment
19.9Insulated elevating work platform
Working on Low Voltage Electrical Equipment
19.10Disconnection and lockout
19.11Warning signs
19.12Working close to energized equipment
19.13Identification of controls
19.14Grounding portable equipment
19.15Ground fault circuit interrupters
Working on High Voltage Electrical Equipment
19.16Isolation and lockout
19.17Warning signs
Working on De-energized High Voltage Power Systems
19.18Isolation and lockout
19.19Person in charge
19.20Switching sequences
19.21Isolating devices
19.22Grounding and blocking
19.23Multiple authorities
Minimum Separation Distance to be Maintained from Energized High Voltage Electrical Equipment and Conductors
19.24Informing workers about high voltage electrical equipment and conductors
19.24.1Minimum approach distance when working close to exposed electrical equipment and conductors
Table 19-1A
19.24.2Minimum clearance distance when passing under exposed electrical equipment and conductors
Table 19-1B
19.25Assurance in writing
19.26Assurance not practicable
19.27Specially trained
Table 19-2: Adjusted limits of approach
19.28Emergency work
19.29Authorization by owner
Tree Pruning and Falling near Energized Conductors
19.30Preliminary inspection
19.31Work in a hazardous area
19.32Qualifications
19.33Site crew requirements
19.34Limits of approach
Table 19-3: Limits of approach for utility arborists
19.34.1Crossing the neutral conductor
Table 19-4
19.35Tree pruning and falling equipment
Control Systems
19.36General requirements
19.37Programmable control systems
19.38Automatic control systems
19.39Remote control systems
19.40Wireless remote control
Electrofishing
19.41General requirements
19.42Repealed
19.43Manufacturer's instructions
Part 20 — Construction, Excavation and Demolition
20.1Definitions
General Requirements
20.1AQualified contractor
20.2Notice of project
20.2.1Notice of project — hazardous substances
20.3Coordination of multiple employer workplaces
Safe Work Areas and Safe Access
20.4Safe access
20.5Temporary floors
20.6Design loads
20.7Repealed
20.8Repealed
20.9Protection from falling materials
20.10Chutes
20.11Repealed
20.12Glass panels
20.13Thrust-out crane landing platforms
20.14Temporary support
20.14.1Fills
20.14.2Stockpiles
20.14.3Unstable face of a stockpile
Bridges and Similar Structures
20.15Drawings and special procedures
20.16Walkways
Concrete Falsework and Formwork
20.16.1Definitions
20.16.2Application
20.17Worksite-specific plans required for specified formwork
20.18Certification of worksite-specific plans by professional engineer
20.19Continuity of engineering
20.20Information for worksite-specific plans
20.21Application drawings and supplementary instructions for flyforms
20.22Flyform handling
20.23Supervision
20.24Equipment requirements
20.25Concrete placing hazards
20.26Inspections
Concrete Pumping
20.26.1Definition
20.26.2Application of regulation
20.26.3Standards
20.27Equipment identification
20.28Manufacturer's, supplier's or integrator's manual
20.29Inspection and maintenance records
20.30Pre-use inspection
20.30.1Design and construction
20.31Controls
20.32Hydraulic cylinders
20.33Marking weight
20.34Lifting a pump
20.35Securing a pump
20.36Repealed
20.37Agitator guarding
20.38Engine exhaust
20.39Housekeeping
20.40Outriggers
20.41Repealed
20.42Pipe diameter and thickness
20.43Pipe clamps
20.44Delivery pipe
20.45Restraining devices
20.46Concrete pump lines
20.47Equipment inspection
20.48Repair and modification
20.48.1Installation of mast
20.49Boom and mast weight
20.50-
20.52
Repealed
20.53Repealed
20.54Hopper signal device
Tilt-up Building Construction
20.55Specifications and plans
20.56Design requirements
20.57Panel handling
20.58Inspections
20.59Brace removal
Concrete Pre-stressing and Post-tensioning
20.60General requirements
20.61Signalling devices and restricted areas
20.62Strand measuring
20.63Guarding during pre-stressing operations
20.64Deflecting devices
20.65Detensioning and strand cutting procedures
20.66Strand vises and hydraulic devices
20.67Hydraulic equipment
20.68Platform width
20.69Blowouts
20.70Tendon handling
20.71Securing jacks
Open Web Joists and Trusses
20.72Erection instructions
Roof Work
20.73Repealed
20.74Crawl boards and ladders
20.75Steep roof requirements
20.76Chutes and hoists
20.77Mechanical equipment
Excavations
20.78Work standards
20.79Underground utility services
20.80Removing nearby hazards
20.81Sloping and shoring requirements
20.82Timber shoring and grades
20.83Safe shoring procedures
20.84Repealed
20.85Trench support structures
20.86Spoil piles
20.87Entry and exit
20.88Guarding
20.89Excavation crossings
20.90Excavated materials
20.91Use of skips or buckets
20.92Scaling and trimming
20.93Height limitations
20.94Positioning equipment
20.95Water accumulation
Table 20-1: Trench support structures
Figure 20-1: Sloping in lieu of shoring
Figure 20-2: Benching in lieu of shoring
Figure 20-3: Combined supporting and sloping
Scaling Operations
20.96Definitions
20.97Work from top down
20.98Rappelling and work positioning systems
20.99Rappelling ropes
20.100Anchors and other hardware
20.101Harnesses
Marine Construction, Pile Driving and Dredging
20.102Suspended work platforms
20.103Hoisting piles
20.104Operator protection
20.105Exhaust discharge
20.106Chocking the hammer
20.107Pile heads
20.108Cracked hammer
20.109Splicing
20.110Walkway on discharge line
Demolition
20.111Structural integrity
20.112Hazardous materials
20.113Disconnecting utility services
20.114Glass removal
20.115Repealed
20.116Protection from falling materials
20.117Throwing material
20.118Stabilizing walls
20.119Dismantling buildings
20.120Housekeeping
20.121Stairways
Work in Compressed Air
20.122Medical fitness
20.123Compliance with standards
Part 21 — Blasting Operations
21.1Definitions
General Requirements
21.2Employer's responsibility
21.3Dangerous incident reports
21.4Blasting log
21.5Authority to blast
21.6Repealed
21.7Training
Certification
21.8Qualifications
21.9Misrepresentation
21.10Examination
21.11Recording certificates
21.12Custody of certificates
21.13Suspension of duties
21.14Submitting reports
21.15Suspension of certificates
Storage
21.16Detonators
21.17Worksite storage
21.18Communication
21.19Magazine condition
21.20Cord
21.21Separate handling
Transportation
21.22Vehicle operation
21.23Flammable materials
21.24Transportation of explosives
21.25Mobile drill rigs
21.26Repealed
21.27Contact with metal
21.28Emergency procedures
21.29Safe operation
21.30Vehicle load limit
21.31Firefighting equipment
21.32Trailer transportation
21.33Railroad and highway crossings
21.34Prior servicing
21.35Overnight parking
Handling Explosives
21.36General
21.37Defective explosives
21.38Cold temperatures
21.39Abandoned explosives
21.40Ignition sources prohibited
21.41Containers
Drilling
21.42Predrilling requirements
21.43Drilling prohibitions
21.44Drill hole size
Loading
21.45Priming
21.46Carrying
21.47Cartridges
21.48Loading tools
21.49Electrical storms
21.50Guarding loaded holes
21.51Vehicles
21.52Springing holes
21.53Connecting detonating cord
21.54Shock tubes
21.55Pneumatic loading
Safety Fuse Initiation
21.56Safety fuse assemblies
21.57Lighting safety fuse
Electrical Initiation
21.58Stray currents
21.59Extraneous currents
21.60Static electricity
21.61Radio frequency precautions
21.62Mobile transmitters
21.63Testing electric blasting circuits
21.63.1Confirming electronic detonator integrity
21.64Capacity of blasting machines
21.65Firing from power lines
Firing
21.66Blaster's responsibility
21.67Firing lines
21.68Firing all holes
21.69Blasting signals
21.70Posting warning procedures
Returning to the Blast Site
21.71After the blast
21.72Electrical blasting
21.73Misfires
Misfire Procedures
21.74Blast site examination
21.75Unfired explosives
21.76Removing loose material
21.77Marking and detonating
21.78Safety fuse reblast
21.79No relighting
21.80Drilling for refiring
21.81Extracting explosives
Specialized Blasting Operations
21.82Underwater blasting
21.83Special effects blasting
21.84Seismic blasting
21.85Avalanche control
Part 22 — Underground Workings
22.1Definitions
General Requirements
22.2Application
22.3Work methods
22.4New or unusual situations
22.5Preconstruction meeting
22.6Notice of project
22.7Underground record
22.8Hours of work
22.9Additional first aid
22.10Retroreflective devices
22.11Self-rescuers
Supervision of Workers
22.12Appointment of underground working supervisor
22.12.1Role of underground working supervisor
22.13Underground worker health and safety representative
22.14Impaired persons
Working Requirements
22.15Responsibility for ventilation
22.16Prior approval
22.17Qualified person
22.18Mechanical ventilation
22.19Air flow
22.20Portal fan
22.21Auxiliary fan
22.22Modifications
22.23Malfunction
22.24Unventilated areas
22.25Duct air testing
22.26Welding fumes
22.27Heating underground air
22.28Heating equipment
22.29Other heating devices
22.30Atmospheric testing
22.31Testing during construction
22.32Additional tests
22.33Radioactivity survey
22.34Electrical installations
22.35Communications
22.36Illumination
22.37Cap lamps
22.38Maintenance
22.39Auxiliary lighting
22.40Battery charging stations
22.41Pipelines
22.42Water control
22.43Dams
22.44Transportation of workers
22.45Transportation of workers by rail
22.46Shaft conveyances
Emergency Requirements
22.47Procedures
22.48Coordination
22.49Evacuation procedure
22.50Refuge stations
22.51Rescue workers
22.52Self-contained breathing apparatus
22.53Dangerous conditions
22.54Fire prevention and control
22.55Flammable gas restriction
22.56Equipment fire extinguishers
22.57Accounting for workers
Entrance to Underground Working
22.58General requirement
22.59Structures at the entrance
22.60Projecting support system
22.61Spill control
Ground Control
22.62General requirement
22.63During excavation
22.64Shotcrete
22.65Operator protection
Drilling
22.66Probe holes
22.67Connecting to existing workings
22.68Blasting at adjacent sites
22.69Inspection before abandonment
Underground Use of Explosives
22.70Transport of explosives
22.71Mechanical haulage
22.72Transport by track haulage
22.73Underground storage of explosives
22.74Restriction on ignition sources
22.75Fume class
22.76Blasting line
22.77Remote initiation
22.78Water spray
22.79Return to blasting site
22.80Work restriction
Mechanical Excavation
22.81Dust control
22.82Work clearance
22.83Elevated work
Fixed and Mobile Equipment in Underground Working
22.84Logs
22.85Internal combustion engines
22.86Fire suppression
22.87Hoses carrying flammable liquid
22.88Operating requirements
Underground Haulage
22.89Traffic control
22.90Clearance for mechanical haulage
22.91Track haulage and mucking equipment
22.92Equipment hazard area
22.93Switching
22.94Derailed equipment
22.95Track haulage operations
22.96Rail tracks and switches
Trackless Loading and Hauling
22.97Automated and remote control systems
22.98Clearance lights
22.99Road maintenance
Waste Dumps and Spoil Areas
22.100General requirement
22.101Dumping procedures
22.102Reversing when dumping
22.103Dump worker
22.104Track waste dump
22.105Electrical trolley systems
Figure 22-1: Standard hand signals for controlling mobile equipment movement
Raises
22.106General requirement
22.107Guarding the bottom of the raise
22.108Explosives
22.109Suspended drill platforms
22.110Raise climbers
22.111Identification plate
22.112General brake requirements
22.113Electrically powered raise climbers
22.114Brake components
22.115Guarding
22.116Controls
22.117Electric equipment
22.118Work platforms
22.119Prohibition
22.120Safety factor
22.121Bolts
22.122Racks and pinions
22.123Repealed
22.124Communication
22.125Inspection before use
22.126Limits and travel stops
22.127Equipment maintenance
22.128Operator's duties
22.129Reporting defects
22.130Repair requirements
22.131Emergency procedures
22.132Maximum load
22.133Riding restriction
22.134After blast monitoring
22.135Transporting material
22.136Electrical shut off
22.137Cleaning
Hoists and Shafts
22.138General requirement
22.139Shaft openings
22.140Access ways
22.141Repealed
Large Diameter Holes
22.142General requirement
22.143Vertical holes
22.144Limiting descent
22.145Water in the hole
22.146Horizontal holes
Gassy Underground Workings
22.147Written notice
22.148Worker instruction
22.149Atmospheric testing
22.150Automatic alarm
22.151Ventilation
22.152Ventilation malfunction
22.153Air velocity
22.154No smoking
22.155Welding and burning
22.156Prohibited metals
22.157Flame arresters
22.158Mechanical excavators
22.159Fire resistant fluids
22.160Combustible dusts
Part 23 — Oil and Gas
23.1Definitions
General Requirements
23.2Application
23.3Repealed
23.4Coordination of multi-employer workplaces
23.5Safe work procedures
23.6Control of static electricity
23.7Fire hazards
23.8Control of ignition sources
23.9Flare pits and flare lines
23.10Fire extinguishers
Table 23-1: Minimum requirements for firefighting equipment
23.11Air operating systems
23.12Pipelines, fittings and valves
23.13Hose connections
23.14Pumps
23.15-
23.16
Repealed
23.17Pipe racks
23.18Handling pipe
23.19Kelly hose and safety lines
23.20Catheads
23.21Rigging up and tearing out
23.22Driver training
23.23Steep slopes
23.24Roads
23.25Transporting liquids
23.26Gauging
23.26.1Liquefied gas used for purging or gauging operations or well stimulation
Geophysical Operations
23.27Power line and upset hazards
23.28Seismic drills
23.29Communications on vehicles
23.30Repealed
Drilling and Servicing Rigs
23.31Size of work area
23.32Inspection and repair
23.33Rig moves
23.34List of weights
23.35Prohibited work areas
23.36SCBA
23.37Blowout preventers
23.38Spudding in
23.39.1Emergency escape systems
23.39.2Emergency escape system 1
23.39.3Emergency escape system 2
23.40Draw works controls
23.41Stabbing boards
23.42Derrick enclosures
23.43Ventilation openings
23.44Pits and tanks
23.45Ladder platforms
23.46Derrick floor access stairways
23.47Guardrails
23.48Hoisting lines
23.49Travelling blocks
23.50Hand guards
23.51Riding hoisting equipment
23.52Guards
23.53Crown blocks
23.54Securing fingers
23.55Counterweight safety lines
23.56Weight indicators
23.57Brakes
23.58Drill pipes, collars and tubing
23.59Mud cans
23.60Rotary tongs
23.61Rotary table
23.62Fuel storage
23.63Guylines
Drill Stem Testing, Swabbing, Cementing, Well Servicing and Stimulation
23.64General requirements
23.64.1Snubbing operations
23.65Swabbing at night
23.66Gauging
23.67Disposal of fluids
23.68Air intake and exhaust
23.69Flow piping systems — integrity assurance program
23.69.1Flow piping systems — selection, installation and operation
23.69.2Flow piping systems — restraint systems
23.69.3Flow piping systems — other requirements
23.70Piping, hoses and valves
23.71High risk fluids
23.72Pressure testing requirements
23.73Hot oiling
23.74Bonding and grounding
Production and Plant Operations
23.75Preventing ignition
23.76Blanking of lines
23.77Retaining walls and diked areas
23.78Truck loading and unloading
23.79Pressure relief
23.80Venting of trucks
23.81Wrenches
Cleaning and Repairing Tanks or Vessels
23.82Inerting
23.83Safety harnesses
23.84Welding precautions
23.85Openings
23.86Electrical equipment
23.87Repealed
Gas Sample Containers
23.88Standards
23.89Safe practices
Part 24 — Diving, Fishing and Other Marine Operations
24.1Definitions
Wharves, Docks and Mooring Floats
24.2Ladders
24.3Lifesaving equipment
24.4Curbs, bullrails, guardrails and barriers
24.5Markings
24.6Rescue boat
Diving Operations
General Requirements
24.7Application
24.8Repealed
24.9Notice of project
24.10Medical certification
24.11Diver's fitness
24.12Training
24.13Evidence of competency
24.14Diving logs
24.15Dive site equipment
24.16Lifelines
24.17Safe diving procedures
24.18Diving supervisor's worksite duties
24.19Crew briefing
24.20Diver's responsibilities
24.21Diving tables
24.22Decompression procedures
24.23Diver care and transportation
24.24Medical alert tag
24.25Hyperbaric chambers
24.26Breathing mediums
24.27Breathing apparatus
24.28Compressor intake
24.29Gauges and meters
24.30Warning devices
24.31Rescue boat
24.32Hoists
24.33Standby diver
24.34Incident investigation reports
Scuba Diving
24.35Communication
24.36Minimum crew
24.37Restrictions on scuba
24.38Equipment
24.39Testing cylinders
Surface Supply Diving
24.40Minimum crew
24.41Diver's tender
24.42Diver's equipment
24.43Compressors
24.44Volume tanks
24.45Breathing air filters
24.46Manifolds and fittings
24.47Breathing gas lines
Deep Diving
24.48General requirements
24.49Hyperbaric chamber
24.50Transportation to the underwater worksite
24.51Rest periods
Submersible Compression Chambers (SCC) and Lock-Out Submersibles (LOS)
24.52Standards
24.53General equipment requirements
24.54Design
24.55Lifting gear
24.56Secondary lifting equipment
24.57Diving system procedures
Atmospheric Diving Systems (ADS)
24.58Registration
24.59General equipment requirements
24.60Secondary means of surfacing
24.61Secondary lifting equipment
Altitude Diving
24.62General procedures
Specific Diving Hazards
24.63Hazardous mechanisms
24.64Intakes, pipes and tunnels
24.65Exceptional hazards
24.66Contaminated environments
Live Boating
24.67General requirements
24.68Procedures
Fishing Operations
General Requirements
24.69Application
24.70Compliance with standards
24.71Owner and master responsibilities
24.72Documentation
24.73Instruction
24.74Emergency procedures
24.75Crewmember responsibility
24.76Vessel preparation
24.77Reporting injuries
24.78Unsafe conditions
24.79Repealed
24.80Slipping and tripping hazards
24.81Guarding of equipment
24.82Inspection of rigging
24.83Access and egress
24.84Protection from falling
24.85Deck openings
24.86De-energization
24.87Equipment control devices
24.88Braking devices
24.89Illumination
24.90Ventilation
24.91Propane installations
24.92Galley requirements
24.93Requirements for sensors and alarms
24.94-
24.95
Repealed
24.96Protection against cold
24.96.1When crewmember must wear a personal flotation device (PFD) or lifejacket
24.96.2Crewmember working alone
24.96.3Record of inspection and maintenance
24.97Crewmember overboard
24.98Davits
24.99Communication
24.100Ozone generators
24.101Loading and offloading
24.102Work areas and operations
24.103Proper lifting
Requirements for Specific Fishing Operations
Gillnetting
Salmon
24.104Drums
24.105Pin rollers
Herring
24.106Work areas and safeguarding
24.107Fouled propellers
24.108Hauling net anchors
24.109Brailers
24.110Towing skiffs
Handlining
24.111Gloves
Longlining
24.112Setting procedures
24.113Knives
24.114Guarding
24.115Hoisting device
Seining
General Requirements
24.116Hairpins and ringstrippers
24.117Spooling gear
24.118Lifting the bag
24.119Drum operation
24.120Brailing
24.121Purse rings
24.122Pumps
24.123Drying up
24.124Power blocks
Seine Skiffs
24.125Communication
24.126Skiff design
24.127Equipment stowage
24.128Repealed
24.129Engine exhaust
24.130Capsize protection
Beachline Operations
24.131Instruction
24.132Tie-up sites
24.133Personal protective equipment
24.134Night operations
Trap Fishing
24.135Master's responsibility
24.136Securing traps
24.137Lifelines
Trawling
24.138Safe work procedures
24.139Securing areas and equipment
24.140Splitting straps
Trolling
24.141Trolling poles
24.142Gurdy brakes
24.143Cockpit covers
Part 25 — Camps
Part 26 — Forestry Operations and Similar Activities
26.1Definitions
General Requirements
26.1.1Prime contractor requirements for forestry operations
26.1.2Multiple-employer workplace
26.2Planning and conducting a forestry operation
26.3Training
26.3.1Forestry operation fire fighting
26.4Notice of project
26.5Initial safety meeting
26.6Repealed
26.7Highly visible clothing
26.7.1Climbing equipment
26.7.2Weather conditions
26.8Cutting cables
26.9Repealed
26.10Metal in saw logs
26.11Dangerous trees
26.12Repealed
Equipment Operation
26.12.1Equipment capabilities
26.12.2Radio controlled equipment
26.13Non-slip floors and controls
26.13.1Equipment operator protections
26.13.2Maintaining operator vision
26.13.3Mobile yarders
26.13.4Saw chain shot
26.14Repealed
26.14.1Hazard area of logging equipment
26.14.2Designated safe work area
26.14.3Traffic control
26.15Repealed
26.16Slope limitations
26.17Repealed
26.18Landslides
26.19-
26.20
Repealed
Manual Falling and Bucking
26.20.1Application
26.21Faller qualifications
26.22Forestry operation faller training
26.22.1Falling supervisors for forestry operations
26.23Procedures for falling and bucking
26.24Responsibility for falling and bucking
26.25Dangerous trees and logs
26.26Falling dangerous trees
26.27Location of fallers
26.28Summoning assistance
26.29Entry to falling area
Mechanical Falling
26.29.1Application
26.29.2Limits on use of mechanical harvester
26.29.3Incomplete falling cuts
26.29.4Hazard area
26.29.5No additional hazards
Traffic Control for Falling Operations
26.30Traffic control
Yarding
26.31Repealed
26.32-
26.33
Repealed
26.33.1Application
26.34Signalling
26.35-
26.37
Repealed
26.38Riding on rigging
26.39Safe location
26.39.1Removal of potential hazards to rigging
26.40Anchors
26.41Guylines
Figure 26-1: Positioning guylines for mobile yarders
26.42Rigging
26.43Supporting blocks
26.44Winches
26.45Prohibition of knots
26.46Skyline anchors
26.47Skyline extensions
26.48Skyline spars
26.49Skyline rigging
26.50Backspar guylines
26.51Lift trees
26.52Repealed
Skidding
26.53Ground skidding operations
26.54Repealed
26.55Mainline release
Forestry Work Areas
26.56Work area arrangement
26.57-
26.58
Repealed
26.59Suspended logs
26.60Repealed
26.61Vehicle movements
26.62Repealed
26.63Unauthorized persons
26.64Bunk and stake assemblies
Hauling
26.65Cab guard
26.66Bunks and stakes
26.67Loading logs
26.68Binders
26.69Binder removal
26.70-
26.71
Repealed
26.71.1Operating procedures
26.71.2Daily log
26.72Warning devices
26.73-
26.75
Repealed
26.76Securing trailers
26.77Assistance on steep grades
26.78Transporting workers
Roads and Road Maintenance
26.79Haul road standards
26.80Creating additional hazards
26.81Bull rails
26.82Roadside hazards
26.83Traffic control systems
26.83.1Radio traffic control
26.84Weigh scales
Water Operations
26.85Condition of boats
26.86Boat equipment
26.87Boat size
26.88Overloading
26.89Presence of operator
26.90Wind and sea conditions
26.91Hand signals
26.92Repealed
26.93General requirements for booming
26.94Rigging
26.95Winches
26.96Manual boom stripping
26.97Repealed
26.98Dumping log bundles
26.99Repealed
Table 26-1: Audible call signals
Table 26-2: Audible signals for vehicle operations
Table 26-3: Audible signals for high lead logging
Table 26-4: Audible signals for slackline logging
Table 26-5: Audible signals for mechanical slack pulling and drop line carriages on skyline yarders or running skyline yarders (as applicable)
Table 26-6: Requirements for radio controlled carriages
Table 26-7: Hand signals
Table 26-8: Voice commands for grapple yarders
Part 27 — Wood Products Manufacturing
27.1Application
General Requirements
27.2Protection from flying debris
27.3Kickback and kickout protection
27.4Pressure rolls
27.5Crossing green chains and decks
27.6Lumber package rollcase access
27.7Mechanical handlers
27.8Veneer clippers
27.9Kilns
27.10Personnel hoists
27.11Hidden hazards
27.12Communication
27.13Water operations
Saws and Knives
27.14Unattended machinery
27.15Sharpening saws and knives
27.16Babbitt melting
27.17Sharp-edged tools
27.18Circular saw guarding
27.19Band saw guarding
27.20Slasher and trim saws
27.21Circular cutoff saws
27.22Splitters
27.23Chop, trim and swing cutoff saws
27.24Circular saw guides
27.25Cutoff saw interlocks
27.26Saw operator location
27.27Repealed
27.28Saw maintenance
27.29Cracks in circular saws
Table 27-1: Circular saw crack limits
27.30Cracks in band saws
Table 27-2: Band saw crack limits
27.31Band saw wheel wear limits
Log Handling
27.32Log-haul walkways
27.33Log hauling equipment
27.34Rolling logs
27.35Barker feed restraints
27.36Bundle breaking
Headrigs
27.37Buffer stops
27.38Locking control levers
27.39Carriage track barriers
27.40Preventing contact
Chippers, Hogs and Planers
27.41Hog and chipper chutes
27.42Hogs, chippers and cutting heads
Materials Handling
27.43Height of chip and sawdust piles
27.44Wood products storage
Shake and Shingle Mills
27.45Shake splitters and cubers
27.46Block size and pile height
27.47Shingle saws
27.48Shake resaw arm guards
27.49Clipper saw guards
27.50Clipper saw brakes
27.51Treadle controls
27.52Set works and reciprocating parts
27.53Carriage speed
27.54Saw diameter
27.55Unattended machines
Part 28 — Agriculture
28.1Definitions
28.2Application
Division 1 — General Conditions
28.3Cold storage rooms
28.4Bridges and culverts
28.5Barriers for manure pits
28.6Instruction of seasonal, temporary and other workers
28.7Animal handling
28.8Indoor air quality exception
28.9Control of environmental tobacco smoke and e-cigarette vapour exception
28.10Drinking water
Division 2 — Hazardous Substances
28.11Personal hygiene
28.12Repealed
28.13Anhydrous ammonia
28.14Ventilation of buildings near manure tanks
Division 3 — Personal Protective Equipment
28.15Horseback riding exception
Division 4 — Equipment
28.16Warning signs for power take-off devices
28.17Signs and procedures for equipment guarding
28.18Hay balers
28.19Round balers
28.20Post-hole diggers
28.21Post drivers
28.22Chain saws exception
28.23Hand winch for auger conveyors
28.24Alternative means of evaluation for automotive lifts and vehicle supports
28.25Orchard ladders exception
28.26Orchard ladders design
28.27Orchard ladders instructions and use
28.28Previously installed fixed ladders exception
28.29Small cranes and hoists exception
28.30Altered application dates for cranes and hoists
28.31Alternative requirements for rigging identification
28.32Evaluation of a rigging device
28.33Older mobile equipment exception
28.34Means of escape exception
28.35Alternative evaluation of an attachment
28.36Alternative for design of riding station
28.37Safety device on older trucks exception
28.38Protective structures exception for mobile equipment
28.39ROPS on older equipment exception
28.40Protective structures exception for agricultural tractors
28.41Rollover protective structures for agricultural tractors
28.42Use of seat belts on agricultural tractors
28.43General requirements for mobile elevating work platforms
28.44Mobile elevating work platform design standards
28.45Identification on mobile elevating work platforms
28.46Fall protection exception
28.47Annual inspection and certification exception
28.48Operational devices exception
28.49Pulling loads
28.50Transportation of workers
Part 29 — Aircraft Operations
29.1Repealed
General Requirements
29.2Application
29.3Pre-job planning and training
29.4Repealed
29.5Communications
29.6-
29.8
Repealed
29.9Airlifted loads
29.10Traffic control
29.11Rotorwash
29.12Unstable materials
29.13-
29.15
Repealed
Forestry Operations
29.16Notification
29.17Site supervision
29.18-
29.19
Repealed
29.20Log loading areas
Pesticide Application
29.21-
29.22
Repealed
29.23Flagpersons
Part 30 — Laboratories
30.1Definition
30.1.1Application
General Requirements
30.2Equipment operation
30.3Repealed
30.4Plumbing
30.5Fire protection
30.6Guarding
30.7Equipment ventilation
30.7.1Definitions
30.8Fume hoods
30.9Airflow and containment monitoring
30.10Ducting
30.11Exhaust discharge
30.12Biological safety cabinets
30.13Centrifuges
30.14Procedures
30.15Permitted quantities
30.16Transport of containers
30.17Personal protection
30.18Spills and other emergencies
30.19Waste disposal
Specific Substances and Procedures
30.20Explosive and highly reactive materials
30.21Perchloric acid
30.22Picric acid
30.23Peroxide-forming compounds
30.24Cryogenic liquids
30.25Sharps
30.26Biological agents and human pathogens
30.27Animal handling
30.28Microtomes
30.29Electrophoresis
Part 31 — Firefighting
31.1Definitions
31.2Application
General Requirements
31.3Health and safety committee
31.4Instruction and direction
31.5Procedures
31.6Rest and rehabilitation
31.7Impounding equipment
31.8Equipment defects
31.9Test records
Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment
31.10General requirement
31.11Maintenance
31.12Firefighter responsibility
31.13Safety headgear
31.14Protective coats, pants and hoods
31.15Stationwear and personal garments
31.16Working gloves
31.17Fall protection
31.18Personal alert safety system
Respiratory Protection
31.19General
31.20Fitness to use SCBA
31.21Operation of SCBA
31.22Sealing and fit testing
31.23Entry into buildings
31.24Air quality and sampling
31.25Spare equipment
31.26Maintenance and records
Transportation
31.27Seating
31.28Communication
31.29Enclosed crew cabs
31.30Stowing equipment
31.31Safe movement of vehicles
31.32Vehicle exhaust in firehalls
Aerial Devices and Ground Ladders
31.33General
31.34Nondestructive testing
31.35Controls
31.36Operator location
31.37Ground ladders
Other Equipment
31.38Flashlights and hand lanterns
31.39Plaster hooks and pike poles
Part 32 — Evacuation and Rescue
32.1Repealed
32.2Training
32.3Equipment
32.4Ropes
32.5Inspection of equipment
32.6Maintenance records
32.7First aid
32.8Communications
32.9Work areas over water
Part 33
33.1-
33.52
Repealed
Part 34 — Rope Access
34.1Definitions
34.2Scope of application
34.3Rope access plan
34.4Training and certification
34.5Safe work practices
34.6Two-rope system
34.7Personal log
34.8Rescue
34.9Equipment
34.10Inspection and maintenance
34.11Anchors and anchorages
34.12Permanent anchors
34.13Temporary anchors
34.14Safety headgear
34.15Maximum arrest force, clearance
34.16Removal from service
Schedule 34-A
Schedules 1 to 7

Part 1 — Definitions

Definitions

1.1   (1) In this Occupational Health and Safety Regulation:

"administrative controls" means the provision, use and scheduling of work activities and resources in the workplace, including planning, organizing, staffing and coordinating, for the purpose of controlling risk;

"B.C. Electrical Code" has the same meaning as in the Electrical Safety Regulation;

"Board" means the Workers' Compensation Board;

"combustible liquid" means a liquid that has a flash point at or above 37.8 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit) and below 93.3 degrees Celsius (200 degrees Fahrenheit);

"contaminant" means a harmful or irritant material, or nuisance dust, foreign to the normal composition of a substance, or a material that varies the normal proportions of components in a mixture such as air;

"engineering controls" means the physical arrangement, design or alteration of workstations, equipment, materials, production facilities or other aspects of the physical work environment, for the purpose of controlling risk;

"flammable liquid" means a liquid that has a flash point below 37.8 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit);

"hazard" means a thing or condition that may expose a person to a risk of injury or occupational disease;

"hazard area" means an area in a workplace where a hazard exists, or is created, due to a condition in the area or the activities conducted in it;

"hazardous product" means any product, mixture, material or substance that is classified in accordance with the regulations made under section 15 (1) of the Hazardous Products Act (Canada) in a category or subcategory of a hazard class listed in Schedule 2 of that Act;

"HEPA" means, in reference to air filtration, a high efficiency particulate air filter meeting the specifications of a nuclear grade filter, providing a 99.97% filtration efficiency at a 0.3 micrometre particle size;

"IDLH atmosphere" means an atmosphere containing a substance at a concentration which is immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) because the concentration is greater than that from which one could escape without any escape-impairing symptoms or irreversible health effects, and includes an atmosphere with an unknown concentration with the potential to be immediately dangerous to life or health;

"incident" includes an accident or other occurrence which resulted in or had the potential for causing an injury or occupational disease;

"mg/m3" means milligrams of a substance per cubic metre of air;

"oxygen deficient" means, in relation to air, a condition in which there is less than 19.5% oxygen by volume, or the partial pressure of oxygen is less than 16.3 kPa (122 mm Hg);

"ppm" means parts of a vapour or a gas per million parts of contaminated air by volume at a temperature of 25 degrees Celsius and an atmospheric pressure of 760 millimetres of mercury;

"practicable" means that which is reasonably capable of being done;

"professional engineer" means a person who is registered or licensed to practise engineering under the provisions of the Engineers and Geoscientists Act;

"professional geoscientist" means a professional geoscientist or licensee under the Engineers and Geoscientists Act;

"qualified" means being knowledgeable of the work, the hazards involved and the means to control the hazards, by reason of education, training, experience or a combination thereof;

"qualified registered professional" means

(a) a professional engineer or professional geoscientist, and

(b) in relation to a forestry operation, a person referred to in paragraph (a) or a registered professional forester, registered forest technologist or holder of a special permit under the Foresters Act;

"rated capacity" or "rated load" means the load that machinery or a piece of equipment is, in accordance with its design, rated to bear under section 4.8;

"resource road" means a road or portion of a road on Crown land, and includes a bridge, culvert, ford or other structure or work associated with the road, but does not include a highway within the meaning of the Transportation Act;

"risk" means a chance of injury or occupational disease;

"safety data sheet" or "SDS" means a document that contains, under the headings that, by virtue of the regulations made under section 15 (1) of the Hazardous Products Act (Canada), are required to appear in the document, information about a hazardous product, including information related to the hazards associated with any use, handling or storage of the hazardous product in the workplace;

"sensitizer" means a substance that has been shown to elicit an allergenic type of response in humans after an initial exposure, resulting in development of symptoms upon subsequent exposure at much lower concentrations;

"supervisor" means a person who instructs, directs and controls workers in the performance of their duties;

"utility service" means a petroleum pipeline, sanitary sewer line, enclosed storm sewer, water line, steam line or electrical cable;

"WHMIS" means the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System referred to in section 5.3;

"working load limit" or "WLL" means the maximum load which a product is authorized by the manufacturer to support in a particular service.

(2) Subject to subsection (3), in this Regulation, "workplace" does not include a resource road.

(3) A portion of a resource road is a workplace during any period within which the portion is being built, maintained, repaired, rehabilitated, stabilized, upgraded, removed or deactivated.

(4) Although a resource road does not constitute a workplace for the purposes of this Regulation, other than in one of the limited circumstances referred to in subsection (3), a reference to a workplace in this Regulation continues to include a thing or place that constitutes a workplace even though that thing, or an activity or the result of an activity initiated or carried out at that place, is in whole or in part on a resource road.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 1; 253/2001, s. 1; 312/2003, App. C, s. 1; 315/2003, App. A, s. 1; 20/2008, App. A, s. 59; 258/2008, App. A, s. 1; 312/2010, App. A, s. 1 and App. D, s. 1; 305/2012, s. 1; 30/2015, s. 1; 9/2017, App. A and App. D, s. 1.]

Part 2 — Application

Scope of application

2.1   This Occupational Health and Safety Regulation applies to all employers, workers and all other persons working in or contributing to the production of any industry within the scope of the OHS provisions of the Workers Compensation Act.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 2; 279/2019, App. D, s. 1.]

General duty

2.2   Despite the absence of a specific requirement, all work must be carried out without undue risk of injury or occupational disease to any person.

Conflict with a code or standard

2.3   If there is any conflict between the requirements of this Regulation and any code or standard with which compliance is required by this Regulation, the provisions of this Regulation prevail.

Compliance

2.4   Every person to whom an order or directive is issued by the Board must comply promptly or by the time set out in the order or directive.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 4.]

Inspection reports

2.5   (1) An inspection report must remain posted for at least 7 days, or until compliance has been achieved, whichever is the longer period.

(2) When a joint committee or a worker health and safety representative is required at a workplace, the employer must produce for the committee or representative the inspection report, or a copy of it, at or before the next meeting of the committee or with the representative.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 5.]

Notification of compliance

2.6   When an employer is required to provide notification of compliance in response to an inspection report the employer must ensure that

(a) a copy of the notification is posted next to the originating inspection report until compliance has been achieved.

(b) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 6.]

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 6.]

Notice to workers

2.7   Every employer must post in a conspicuous place at each workplace any placard issued by the Board titled "Notice to Workers".

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 7.]

Contravention

2.8   (1) A contravention of this Regulation will be deemed to be a contravention by the employer and will make that employer liable for any penalty prescribed by the Workers Compensation Act.

(2) A contravention of this Regulation by a supervisor or a worker will be deemed to be a contravention by the supervisor and will make that supervisor liable for any penalty prescribed by the Workers Compensation Act.

(3) A contravention of this Regulation by a worker will make that worker liable for any penalty prescribed by the Workers Compensation Act.

(4) A contravention of this Regulation by a person working in or contributing to the production of an industry within the scope of the Workers Compensation Act will make that person liable for any penalty prescribed by the Act.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 9.]

Part 3 — Rights and Responsibilities

Occupational Health and Safety Programs

When program required

3.1   (1) An occupational health and safety program as outlined in section 3.3 must be initiated and maintained

(a) by each employer that has

(i) a workforce of 20 or more workers, and

(ii) at least one workplace that is determined under section 3.16 (2) (b) to create a moderate or high risk of injury, or

(b) by each employer that has a workforce of 50 or more workers.

(1.1) If subsection (1) (a) or (b) applies to the employer, the occupational health and safety program applies to the whole of the employer's operations.

(2) Despite subsection (1) an occupational health and safety program may be required in any workplace when, in the opinion of an officer, such a program is necessary.

[am. B.C. Regs. 348/2003, s. 10; 19/2006, s. 1; 320/2007, App. A, s. 1.]

Small operations

3.2   In any operation where the workforce is less than that referred to in section 3.1 (1) the employer must

(a) initiate and maintain a less formal program based on regular monthly meetings with workers for discussion of health and safety matters,

(b) ensure that meetings are directed to matters concerning the correction of unsafe conditions and practices and the maintenance of cooperative interest in the health and safety of the workforce, and

(c) maintain a record of the meetings and the matters discussed.

Contents of program

3.3   The occupational health and safety program must be designed to prevent injuries and occupational diseases, and without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the program must include

(a) a statement of the employer's aims and the responsibilities of the employer, supervisors and workers,

(b) provision for the regular inspection of premises, equipment, work methods and work practices, at appropriate intervals, to ensure that prompt action is undertaken to correct any hazardous conditions found,

(c) appropriate written instructions, available for reference by all workers, to supplement this Occupational Health and Safety Regulation,

(d) provision for holding periodic management meetings for the purpose of reviewing health and safety activities and incident trends, and for the determination of necessary courses of action,

(e) provision for the prompt investigation of incidents to determine the action necessary to prevent their recurrence,

(f) the maintenance of records and statistics, including reports of inspections and incident investigations, with provision for making this information available to the joint committee or worker health and safety representative, as applicable and, upon request, to an officer, the union representing the workers at the workplace or, if there is no union, the workers at the workplace, and

(g) provision by the employer for the instruction and supervision of workers in the safe performance of their work.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 12.]

Repealed

3.4   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 195/2015, s. 1.]

Workplace Inspections

General requirement

3.5   Every employer must ensure that regular inspections are made of all workplaces, including buildings, structures, grounds, excavations, tools, equipment, machinery and work methods and practices, at intervals that will prevent the development of unsafe working conditions.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 16.]

Repealed

3.6   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 1.]

Special inspections

3.7   A special inspection must be made when required by malfunction or accident.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 16.]

Committee participation

3.8   An inspection required by section 3.5 and a major inspection required by section 3.7 must, where feasible, include the participation of members of the joint committee or the worker health and safety representative, as applicable, but

(a) if there is no committee or worker health and safety representative the employer must designate an employer representative and the union must designate a worker representative, or

(b) if there is no union the employer must invite the workers to designate one of their number.

[en. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 17, am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 18.]

Correction of Unsafe Conditions

Remedy without delay

3.9   Unsafe or harmful conditions found in the course of an inspection must be remedied without delay.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 18.]

Reporting unsafe conditions

3.10   Whenever a person observes what appears to be an unsafe or harmful condition or act the person must report it as soon as possible to a supervisor or to the employer, and the person receiving the report must investigate the reported unsafe condition or act and must ensure that any necessary corrective action is taken without delay.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 18.]

Emergency circumstances

3.11   If emergency action is required to correct a condition which constitutes an immediate threat to workers only those qualified and properly instructed workers necessary to correct the unsafe condition may be exposed to the hazard, and every possible effort must be made to control the hazard while this is being done.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 18.]

Refusal of Unsafe Work

Procedure for refusal

3.12   (1) A person must not carry out or cause to be carried out any work process or operate or cause to be operated any tool, appliance or equipment if that person has reasonable cause to believe that to do so would create an undue hazard to the health and safety of any person.

(2) A worker who refuses to carry out a work process or operate a tool, appliance or equipment pursuant to subsection (1) must immediately report the circumstances of the unsafe condition to his or her supervisor or employer.

(3) A supervisor or employer receiving a report made under subsection (2) must immediately investigate the matter and

(a) ensure that any unsafe condition is remedied without delay, or

(b) if in his or her opinion the report is not valid, must so inform the person who made the report.

(4) If the procedure under subsection (3) does not resolve the matter and the worker continues to refuse to carry out the work process or operate the tool, appliance or equipment, the supervisor or employer must investigate the matter in the presence of the worker who made the report and in the presence of

(a) a worker member of the joint committee,

(b) a worker who is selected by a trade union representing the worker, or

(c) if there is no joint committee or the worker is not represented by a trade union, any other reasonably available worker selected by the worker.

(5) If the investigation under subsection (4) does not resolve the matter and the worker continues to refuse to carry out the work process or operate the tool, appliance or equipment, both the supervisor, or the employer, and the worker must immediately notify an officer, who must investigate the matter without undue delay and issue whatever orders are deemed necessary.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 19.]

No discriminatory action

3.13   (1) A worker must not be subject to prohibited action as defined in section 47 of the Workers Compensation Act because the worker has acted in compliance with section 3.12 or with an order made by an officer.

(2) Temporary assignment to alternative work at no loss in pay to the worker until the matter in section 3.12 is resolved is deemed not to constitute prohibited action.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 20; 279/2019, App. D, s. 2.]

Occupational First Aid

Definitions

3.14   In this section and in sections 3.15 to 3.21:

"first aid" means

(a) in cases in which a person will need medical treatment, treatment for the purpose of preserving life and minimizing the consequences of injury until medical treatment is obtained, and

(b) treatment of minor injuries that would otherwise receive no medical treatment or that do not need medical treatment;

"first aid attendant" means a person who holds a valid first aid certificate issued by the Board or by a person recognized by the Board and who is designated as a first aid attendant by the employer;

"injured worker" means a worker who suffers an injury during work;

"injury" includes an occupational disease or illness;

"medical certificate" means a report in a form acceptable to the Board from a physician registered under the Medical Practitioners Act as to a person's fitness to perform the functions of a first aid attendant.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 2.]

First aid attendant qualifications

3.15   The employer must ensure that a person who is designated as a first aid attendant

(a) is at least 16 years old,

(b) has successfully completed the first aid training course or first aid examination developed or approved by the Board,

(c) has a first aid certificate in good standing at the required level issued by the Board or a person recognized by the Board, and

(d) meets any other requirements determined by the Board for designation as a first aid attendant.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 2.]

Basic requirements

3.16   (1) The employer must provide for each workplace such equipment, supplies, facilities, first aid attendants and services as are adequate and appropriate for

(a) promptly rendering first aid to workers if they suffer an injury at work, and

(b) transporting injured workers to medical treatment.

(1.1) The type and quantity of equipment, supplies, facilities, first aid attendants and services referred to in subsection (1) must be no less than is required by Schedule 3-A.

(1.2) The quality, maintenance and use of equipment, facilities and methods of transportation referred to in this section must be acceptable to the Board.

(2) For the purpose of complying with subsection (1), the employer must conduct an assessment of the circumstances of the workplace, including

(a) the number of workers who may require first aid at any time,

(b) the nature and extent of the risks and hazards in the workplace, including whether or not the workplace as a whole creates a low, moderate or high risk of injury,

(c) the types of injuries likely to occur,

(d) any barriers to first aid being provided to an injured worker, and

(e) the time that may be required to obtain transportation and to transport an injured worker to medical treatment.

(3) The employer must review the assessment under subsection (2)

(a) within 12 months after the previous assessment or review, and

(b) whenever a significant change affecting the assessment occurs in the employer's operations.

(4) First aid equipment, supplies and facilities must be kept clean, dry and ready for use, and be readily accessible at any time a worker works in the workplace.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 2; am. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. A, ss. 2 and 3.]

First aid procedures

3.17   (1) The employer must keep up-to-date written procedures for providing first aid at the worksite including

(a) the equipment, supplies, facilities, first aid attendants and services available,

(b) the location of, and how to call for, first aid,

(c) how the first aid attendant is to respond to a call for first aid,

(d) the authority of the first aid attendant over the treatment of injured workers and the responsibility of the employer to report injuries to the Board,

(e) who is to call for transportation for the injured worker, and the method of transportation and calling, and

(f) prearranged routes in and out of the workplace and to medical treatment.

(2) The employer must post the procedures conspicuously in suitable locations throughout the workplace or, if posting is not practicable, the employer must adopt other measures to ensure that the information is effectively communicated to workers.

(3) The first aid attendant and all other persons authorized to call for transportation for injured workers must be trained in the procedures.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 2.]

Air transportation

3.17.1   If air transportation is the primary or only method for transporting an injured worker, all of the following requirements must be met:

(a) before the start of operations in a workplace, arrangements must be made with an air service to ensure that an appropriate aircraft is reasonably available to the workplace during those operations;

(b) the arrangements in paragraph (a) must include procedures for

(i) the employer to determine the availability of appropriate aircraft before the start of each work day, and

(ii) the air service to notify the employer if an appropriate aircraft ceases to be available;

(c) a system must be provided that enables the pilot of the aircraft and the first aid attendant attending to an injured worker to communicate at all times when the aircraft is in transit to the location of the injured worker and during transport of the injured worker to medical treatment.

[en. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. A, s. 4.]

Communication and availability

3.18   (1) The employer must provide an effective means for

(a) communication between the first aid attendant and the workers served, and

(b) the first aid attendant to call for assistance.

(2) The employer must not assign, and the first aid attendant must not undertake, employment activities that will interfere with the attendant's ability to receive and respond to a request for first aid.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 2.]

First aid records

3.19   (1) The employer must maintain at the workplace, in a form acceptable to the Board, a record of all injuries and exposures to contaminants covered by this Regulation that are reported or treated.

(2) First aid records must be kept for at least 3 years.

(3) First aid records are, to be kept confidential and may not be disclosed except as permitted by this Regulation or otherwise permitted by law.

(4) First aid records must be available for inspection by an officer of the Board.

(5) Workers may request or authorize access to their first aid records for any treatment or report about themselves.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 2.]

Multiple employer workplaces

3.20   If workers of 2 or more employers are working at a workplace at the same time, the prime contractor must

(a) conduct an assessment of the circumstances of the workplace under section 3.16 (2) in relation to all the workers in the workplace, and

(b) do everything that is reasonably practicable to establish and maintain the first aid equipment, supplies, facilities, first aid attendants and services required under section 3.16.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 2; am. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. A, s. 5.]

First aid attendant responsibilities

3.21   (1) The first aid attendant must

(a) promptly provide injured workers with a level of care within the scope of the attendant's training and this Part,

(b) objectively record observed or reported signs and symptoms of injuries and exposures to contaminants covered by this Regulation, and

(c) refer for medical treatment workers with injuries considered by the first aid attendant as being serious or beyond the scope of the attendant's training.

(2) A first aid attendant must be physically and mentally capable of safely and effectively performing the required duties, and the Board may at any time require the attendant to provide a medical certificate.

(3) The first aid attendant is responsible, and has full authority, for all first aid treatment of an injured worker until responsibility for treatment is accepted

(a) at a place of medical treatment,

(b) by an ambulance service acceptable to the Board, or

(c) by a person with higher or equivalent first aid certification.

(4) The first aid attendant does not have authority to overrule a worker's decision to seek medical treatment or the worker's choice of medical treatment.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 2.]

Young or New Workers

Definitions

3.22   In sections 3.23 to 3.25:

"new worker" means any worker who is

(a) new to the workplace,

(b) returning to a workplace where the hazards in that workplace have changed during the worker's absence,

(c) affected by a change in the hazards of a workplace, or

(d) relocated to a new workplace if the hazards in that workplace are different from the hazards in the worker's previous workplace;

"young worker" means any worker who is under 25 years of age.

[en. B.C. Reg. 105/2007.]

Young or new worker orientation and training

3.23   (1) An employer must ensure that before a young or new worker begins work in a workplace, the young or new worker is given health and safety orientation and training specific to that young or new worker's workplace.

(2) The following topics must be included in the young or new worker's orientation and training:

(a) the name and contact information for the young or new worker's supervisor;

(b) the employer's and young or new worker's rights and responsibilities under the Workers Compensation Act and this Regulation including the reporting of unsafe conditions and the right to refuse to perform unsafe work;

(c) workplace health and safety rules;

(d) hazards to which the young or new worker may be exposed, including risks from robbery, assault or confrontation;

(e) working alone or in isolation;

(f) violence in the workplace;

(g) personal protective equipment;

(h) location of first aid facilities and means of summoning first aid and reporting illnesses and injuries;

(i) emergency procedures;

(j) instruction and demonstration of the young or new worker's work task or work process;

(k) the employer's health and safety program, if required under section 3.1 of this Regulation;

(l) WHMIS information requirements set out in Part 5, as applicable to the young or new worker's workplace;

(m) contact information for the occupational health and safety committee or the worker health and safety representative, as applicable to the workplace.

[en. B.C. Reg. 105/2007.]

Additional orientation and training

3.24   An employer must provide a young or new worker with additional orientation and training if

(a) workplace observation reveals that the young or new worker is not able to perform work tasks or work processes safely, or

(b) requested by the young or new worker.

[en. B.C. Reg. 105/2007.]

Documentation

3.25   An employer must keep records of all orientation and training provided under sections 3.23 and 3.24.

[en. B.C. Reg. 105/2007.]

Joint Health and Safety Committees

Evaluation of joint committees

3.26   (1) In this section, a reference to a joint committee does not include a joint committee established and maintained under section 32 of the Workers Compensation Act, if

(a) an order under section 32 (1) of the Workers Compensation Act respecting the joint committee provides for a variation as set out in subsection (2) (b) of that section of that Act, and

(b) the variation is in regards to evaluating the joint committee.

(2) An employer must ensure that, with respect to each of the employer's joint committees, a written evaluation is conducted annually by

(a) the co-chairs of the joint committee or, with respect to each co-chair, the member or members of the joint committee designated by the co-chair, or

(b) the employer or a person retained by the employer.

(3) The evaluation must contain, but is not limited to, the following information:

(a) whether or not, throughout the period of time that is the subject of the evaluation,

(i) the joint committee met the membership requirements under section 33 of the Workers Compensation Act,

(ii) worker representatives on the joint committee were selected in accordance with section 34 of the Workers Compensation Act,

(iii) employer representatives on the joint committee were selected in accordance with section 35 of the Workers Compensation Act,

(iv) the joint committee fulfilled each of its duties and functions under section 36 of the Workers Compensation Act,

(v) the joint committee met regularly as required under section 37 (2) of the Workers Compensation Act,

(vi) the employer met the requirements under section 39 of the Workers Compensation Act in respect of the written recommendations sent to the employer by the joint committee with a written request for a response from the employer, if any,

(vii) each member of the joint committee received the time off from work the member was entitled to receive under section 40 of the Workers Compensation Act,

(viii) each member of the joint committee attended the occupational health and safety training courses the member was entitled to attend under section 41 of the Workers Compensation Act,

(ix) the employer provided to the joint committee the equipment, premises, clerical personnel and information the employer was required to provide under section 42 of the Workers Compensation Act,

(x) the joint committee prepared reports of its meetings and provided copies to the employer as required under section 43 (1) of the Workers Compensation Act,

(xi) the employer met the requirements of posting and keeping posted committee information as set out in section 44 of the Workers Compensation Act, and

(xii) each member of the joint committee received the instruction and training the employer was required to ensure was provided to the member under section 3.27 of this regulation;

(b) an assessment of the effectiveness of the joint committee's rules of procedure as established under section 37 (1) of the Workers Compensation Act;

(c) an assessment of the overall effectiveness of the joint committee.

(4) If the employer or a person retained by the employer conducts the evaluation, the employer or person retained by the employer, as the case may be, must, as part of the evaluation, obtain and consider the input of the co-chairs of the joint committee or, with respect to each co-chair, the member or members of the joint committee designated by the co-chair, on the matters listed in subsection (3).

(5) The employer and the joint committee must each provide to the other a copy of the evaluation if the other does not have a copy.

(6) The joint committee must

(a) discuss the evaluation at the joint committee meeting immediately following

(i) receipt of the evaluation, if the employer or a person retained by the employer conducted the evaluation, or

(ii) the completion of the evaluation, if members of the joint committee conducted the evaluation, and

(b) ensure that the evaluation and a summary of the discussion referred to in paragraph (a) are included in the report of that meeting.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2016, App. A; am. B.C. Reg. 279/2019, App. D, s. 10.]

Minimum training requirements for new joint committee members or worker health and safety representatives

3.27   (1) In this section, a reference to a joint committee does not include a joint committee established and maintained under section 32 of the Workers Compensation Act, if

(a) an order under section 32 (1) of the Workers Compensation Act respecting the joint committee provides for a variation as set out in subsection (2) (b) of that section of that Act, and

(b) the variation is in regards to providing instruction and training to the members of the joint committee.

(2) The employer must ensure that each member of the employer's joint committees who was selected on or after April 3, 2017 to be a member receives, as soon as practicable but no more than 6 months after becoming a member, a total of at least 8 hours of instruction and training, as set out in subsection (4).

(3) The employer must ensure that the worker health and safety representative at each of the employer's workplaces who was selected on or after April 3, 2017 to be a representative receives, as soon as practicable but no more than 6 months after becoming a representative, a total of at least 4 hours of instruction and training, as set out in subsection (5).

(4) The instruction and training referred to in subsection (2) must include the following topics:

(a) the duties and functions of a joint committee under section 36 of the Workers Compensation Act;

(b) the rules of procedure of the joint committee as established under or set out in section 37 of the Workers Compensation Act;

(c) the requirements respecting investigations under sections 69 to 72 of the Workers Compensation Act;

(d) the requirements respecting inspections under sections 3.5, 3.7 and 3.8 of this regulation and how to make regular inspections under section 3.5 of this regulation;

(e) the requirements respecting refusal of unsafe work under section 3.12 of this regulation;

(f) the requirements respecting the evaluation of joint committees under section 3.26 of this regulation.

(5) The instruction and training referred to in subsection (3) must include the topics described in subsection (4) (a), (c), (d) and (e).

(6) Subsection (2) does not apply in respect of a person who is a member of a joint committee if

(a) 2 years or less before becoming a member of the joint committee, the person was a member of that joint committee or a different joint committee, and

(b) the person, as a member of the joint committee or a different joint committee as set out in paragraph (a), received at least 8 hours of instruction and training on the topics described in subsection (4).

(7) Subsection (3) does not apply in respect of a person who is a worker health and safety representative at a workplace if

(a) 2 years or less before becoming a worker health and safety representative at the workplace, the person was

(i) a member of a joint committee, or

(ii) a worker health and safety representative at that workplace or a different workplace, and

(b) the person, as a member of a joint committee, or as a worker health and safety representative at the workplace or a different workplace, as set out in paragraph (a), received at least 4 hours of instruction and training on the topics described in subsection (5).

(8) The employer must ensure that a person who receives instruction and training as set out in subsection (2) or (3) receives a copy of the person's training record as soon as practicable after the training is completed.

(9) The employer must, with respect to each person who receives instruction and training as set out in subsection (2) or (3), keep the person's training record until 2 years from the date the person ceases to be a member of the employer's joint committee or a worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

(10) For greater certainty, the instruction and training required under subsection (2) or (3) of this section is not educational leave as set out in section 41 of the Workers Compensation Act.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2016, App. B; am. B.C. Reg. 279/2019, App. D, s. 10.]

Participation in Investigations

Participation by employer or representative of employer and worker representative

3.28   For the purposes of section 70 (2) (c) of the Workers Compensation Act, the following activities are prescribed:

(a) assisting the persons carrying out the investigation with gathering information relating to the investigation;

(b) assisting the persons carrying out the investigation with analyzing the information gathered during the investigation;

(c) assisting the persons carrying out the investigation with identifying any corrective actions necessary to prevent recurrence of similar incidents.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2016, App. C; am. B.C. Reg. 279/2019, App. D, s. 10.]

Schedule 3-A

[en. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. A, s. 6.]

Minimum Levels of First Aid

1   In this Schedule:

"ambulance service" means an ambulance service acceptable to the Board;

"hospital" means a hospital within the meaning of the Hospital Act or a diagnostic and treatment centre where the hospital or centre has

(a) an emergency department or resuscitation area, and

(b) a physician on duty or immediately available on call.

2   (1) Tables 1 to 6 have different levels of first aid service that are based on how long it takes to transport an injured person to a hospital and the number of workers per shift.

(2) Exceptions to note: In circumstances in which Tables 1 to 6 would otherwise require a Level 2 first aid certificate under column 3 [noted with an asterisk (*)], a Level 3 first aid certificate is required and an Emergency Transportation Vehicle ("ETV") must be provided, if

(a) there is on the access route to the workplace an obstruction, barrier, rough terrain or other similar circumstances likely to delay the arrival of an ambulance service for more than 20 minutes after it was dispatched, or

(b) there are areas in the workplace which an ambulance service cannot safely access, and for which workers at the workplace are required by this Regulation to be trained, equipped and capable of effecting rescue.

Table 1: This table applies to a workplace that an employer determines under section 3.16 (2) (b) of the Regulation creates a low risk of injury and that is more than 20 minutes surface travel time away from a hospital.

ItemColumn 1
Number of workers
per shift
Column 2
Supplies, equipment,
and facility
Column 3
Level of first aid
certificate for attendant
Column 4
Transportation
11• Personal first aid kit  
22-5• Basic first aid kit  
36-30• Level 1 first aid kitLevel 1 certificate 
431-50• Level 1 first aid kit
• ETV equipment
Level 1 certificate with Transportation Endorsement 
551-75• Level 3 first aid kit
• Dressing station
• ETV equipment
Level 3 certificate 
676 or more• Level 3 first aid kit
• First aid room
• ETV equipment
Level 3 certificateETV

Table 2: This table applies to a workplace that an employer determines under section 3.16 (2) (b) of the Regulation creates a low risk of injury and that is 20 minutes or less surface travel time away from a hospital.

ItemColumn 1
Number of workers
per shift
Column 2
Supplies, equipment,
and facility
Column 3
Level of first aid
certificate for attendant
Column 4
Transportation
11   
22-10• Basic first aid kit  
311-50• Level 1 first aid kitLevel 1 certificate 
451-100• Level 2 first aid kit
• Dressing station
* Level 2 certificate 
5101 or more• Level 2 first aid kit
• First aid room
* Level 2 certificate 

Table 3: This table applies to a workplace that an employer determines under section 3.16 (2) (b) of the Regulation creates a moderate risk of injury and that is more than 20 minutes surface travel time away from a hospital.

ItemColumn 1
Number of workers
per shift
Column 2
Supplies, equipment,
and facility
Column 3
Level of first aid
certificate for attendant
Column 4
Transportation
11• Personal first aid kit  
22-5• Level 1 first aid kitLevel 1 certificate 
36-15• Level 1 first aid kit
• ETV equipment
Level 1 certificate with Transportation Endorsement 
416-50• Level 3 first aid kit
• Dressing station
• ETV equipment
Level 3 certificateETV
551-100• Level 3 first aid kit
• First aid room
• ETV equipment
Level 3 certificateETV
6101-300• Level 3 first aid kit
• First aid room
• Industrial ambulance equipment
Level 3 certificateIndustrial ambulance
7301 or more• Level 3 first aid kit
• First aid room
• Industrial ambulance equipment
2 attendants, each with Level 3 certificatesIndustrial ambulance

Table 4: This table applies to a workplace that an employer determines under section 3.16 (2) (b) of the Regulation creates a moderate risk of injury and that is 20 minutes or less surface travel time away from a hospital.

ItemColumn 1
Number of workers
per shift
Column 2
Supplies, equipment,
and facility
Column 3
Level of first aid
certificate for attendant
Column 4
Transportation
11• Personal first aid kit  
22-5• Basic first aid kit  
36-25• Level 1 first aid kitLevel 1 certificate 
426-75• Level 2 first aid kit
• Dressing station
* Level 2 certificate 
576 or more• Level 2 first aid kit
• First aid room
* Level 2 certificate 

Table 5: This table applies to a workplace that an employer determines under section 3.16 (2) (b) of the Regulation creates a high risk of injury and that is more than 20 minutes surface travel time away from a hospital.

ItemColumn 1
Number of workers
per shift
Column 2
Supplies, equipment,
and facility
Column 3
Level of first aid
certificate for attendant
Column 4
Transportation
11• Personal first aid kit  
22-5• Level 1 first aid kitLevel 1 certificate 
36-10• Level 1 first aid kit
• ETV equipment
Level 1 certificate with Transportation EndorsementETV
411-30• Level 3 first aid kit
• Dressing station
• ETV equipment
Level 3 certificateETV
531-50• Level 3 first aid kit
• First aid room
• ETV equipment
Level 3 certificateETV
651-200• Level 3 first aid kit
• First aid room
• Industrial ambulance equipment
Level 3 certificateIndustrial ambulance
7201 or more• Level 3 first aid kit
• First aid room
• Industrial ambulance equipment
2 attendants, each with Level 3 certificatesIndustrial ambulance

Table 6: This table applies to a workplace that an employer determines under section 3.16 (2) (b) of the Regulation creates a high risk of injury and that is 20 minutes or less surface travel time away from a hospital.

ItemColumn 1
Number of workers
per shift
Column 2
Supplies, equipment,
and facility
Column 3
Level of first aid
certificate for attendant
Column 4
Transportation
11• Personal first aid kit  
22-15• Level 1 first aid kitLevel 1 certificate 
316-30• Level 2 first aid kit
• Dressing station
* Level 2 certificate 
431-300• Level 2 first aid kit
• First aid room
* Level 2 certificate 
5301 or more• Level 2 first aid kit
• First aid room
* 2 attendants, each with Level 2 certificates 

Part 4 — General Conditions

Buildings, Structures and Equipment

Safe workplace

4.1   A workplace must be planned, constructed, used and maintained to protect from danger any person working at the workplace.

[en. B.C. Reg. 258/2008, App. A, s. 2.]

Avalanche risk assessment and safety plan

4.1.1   (1) In this section and section 4.1.2:

"avalanche" means snow avalanche;

"avalanche risk assessment" means the assessment referred to in subsection (2) (a);

"avalanche safety plan" means the plan referred to in subsection (2) (b);

"avalanche safety program" means the program referred to in subsection (6).

(2) Subject to section 4.1.2, if a person working at a workplace may be exposed to a risk associated with an avalanche, the employer must ensure that no work is carried out at the workplace until

(a) a written avalanche risk assessment is completed, and

(b) if the avalanche risk assessment indicates that a person working at the workplace will be exposed to a risk associated with an avalanche, a written avalanche safety plan is developed and implemented.

(3) The avalanche risk assessment must be conducted by a qualified person.

(4) In conducting the avalanche risk assessment, the qualified person must consider all of the hazards and risks associated with an avalanche, including, without limitation, the following:

(a) the topography and vegetation in the area of the workplace;

(b) the snow conditions in the area of the workplace;

(c) the history of avalanches in the area of the workplace;

(d) the nature and duration of work activities to be carried out at the workplace;

(e) the extent, if any, to which the nature and duration of work activities to be carried out at the workplace may affect the topography, vegetation or snow conditions in the area of the workplace;

(f) the nature of the workplace and the buildings and structures at the workplace.

(5) The avalanche safety plan must be developed by a qualified person and, subject to subsection (6), must include measures to eliminate the risks associated with an avalanche.

(6) If eliminating the risks associated with an avalanche is not practicable, the avalanche safety plan must include measures and procedures to minimize those risks, including an avalanche safety program that provides for

(a) the regular monitoring of weather, snow and avalanche conditions in the area of the workplace, at intervals the qualified person considers will be effective,

(b) the implementation of closures or other measures, as specified in the avalanche safety program, and

(c) safe work procedures to be followed by persons working at the workplace.

(7) The employer must make a copy of the avalanche safety program readily available to each person who administers or implements the avalanche safety program for the workplace.

(8) Whenever there is a significant change in the hazards or risks associated with an avalanche in the area of the workplace, the employer must do the following, unless the change is already addressed by the avalanche safety plan:

(a) ensure that a qualified person reviews the avalanche risk assessment and the avalanche safety plan;

(b) make changes to the avalanche risk assessment and the avalanche safety plan, as considered necessary by the qualified person, to reflect the current hazards and risks associated with an avalanche in the area of the workplace.

(9) If the avalanche safety plan includes procedures applicable to a person's work at the workplace,

(a) the employer must provide information and training to the person respecting the procedures, and

(b) the person must comply with the procedures.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. A, s. 1.]

Avalanche risk assessment and safety plan exception

4.1.2   (1) Section 4.1.1 does not apply to work carried out to evaluate whether a person working at the workplace may be exposed to a risk associated with an avalanche.

(2) Section 4.1.1 does not apply if compliance with that section is not practicable when carrying out the following types of work at a workplace where a person may be exposed to a risk associated with an avalanche:

(a) work that

(i) is carried out intermittently,

(ii) involves moving through the workplace without stopping for a significant length of time in a particular area of the workplace, and

(iii) has minimal potential to trigger an avalanche;

(b) work related to an emergency;

(c) work carried out to complete an avalanche risk assessment;

(d) work carried out to develop an avalanche safety plan.

(3) Before a person carries out work to which subsection (2) applies, the employer must ensure that

(a) written safe work procedures are in place to minimize the risks associated with an avalanche, and

(b) the person

(i) understands the risks associated with an avalanche, and

(ii) is trained in the procedures referred to in paragraph (a) of this subsection.

(4) The safe work procedures required under subsection (3) must be developed by a qualified person and must set out the following:

(a) the qualifications and training a person must have in order to be eligible to carry out work to which subsection (2) applies;

(b) the procedures the person referred to in paragraph (a) of this subsection must follow to identify and address risks associated with an avalanche;

(c) the requirements the person referred to in paragraph (a) of this subsection must comply with when using equipment.

(5) A person carrying out work to which subsection (2) applies must comply with the safe work procedures required under subsection (3).

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. A, s. 1.]

Safe buildings and structures

4.2   The employer must ensure that each building and temporary or permanent structure in a workplace is capable of withstanding any stresses likely to be imposed on it.

Safe machinery and equipment

4.3   (1) The employer must ensure that each tool, machine and piece of equipment in the workplace is

(a) capable of safely performing the functions for which it is used, and

(b) selected, used and operated in accordance with

(i) the manufacturer's instructions, if available,

(ii) safe work practices, and

(iii) the requirements of this Regulation.

(2) Unless otherwise specified by this Regulation, the installation, inspection, testing, repair and maintenance of a tool, machine or piece of equipment must be carried out

(a) in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and any standard the tool, machine or piece of equipment is required to meet, or

(b) as specified by a professional engineer.

(3) A tool, machine or piece of equipment determined to be unsafe for use must be identified in a manner which will ensure it is not inadvertently returned to service until it is made safe for use.

(4) Unless otherwise specified by this Regulation, any modification of a tool, machine or piece of equipment must be carried out in accordance with

(a) the manufacturer's instructions, if available,

(b) safe work practices, and

(c) the requirements of this Regulation.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 2; am. B.C. Reg. 243/2006, s. 1.]

Conformity to standards

4.4   (1) If this Regulation requires that a tool, machine or piece of equipment manufactured before April 15, 1998 must meet a code or standard, the tool, machine or piece of equipment must conform to the edition of the code or standard referred to in this Regulation or the edition of the code or standard published at the time the tool, machine or piece of equipment was manufactured, subject only to the modification or upgrading specified to be necessary in this Regulation or in a directive issued by the Board.

(2) When this Regulation requires a person to comply with

(a) a publication, code or standard of the Board or another agency, the person may, as an alternative, comply with another publication, code or standard acceptable to the Board, or

(b) practices, procedures or rules of the Board or another agency, the person may, as an alternative, comply with another practice, procedure or rule acceptable to the Board.

[en. B.C. Reg. 253/2001, s. 2; am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 1.]

Manuals and information

4.5   If this Regulation requires an operation or maintenance manual for a tool, machine or piece of equipment, the employer must ensure that before the tool, machine or piece of equipment is used in the workplace

(a) the manual has been obtained, and

(b) the supplier has provided sufficient information to identify the standard or standards to which the tool, machine or equipment has been manufactured.

(c) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. J, s. 1 (c).]

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. J, s. 1.]

Reassembly

4.6   If machinery, equipment or a structure is dismantled in whole or in part, and subsequently re-assembled, it must be checked by a qualified person and determined to be safe before operation or use.

Information on rated capacity

4.7   If a machine or piece of equipment has a rated capacity which varies with the reach or configuration of the machine or equipment, or has other operating limitations,

(a) appropriate instructions, load charts and warning notices must be affixed to the machine or equipment so as to be visible to the operator when the operator is at the controls, or

(b) the information, in written form, must be available to the operator.

Rated capacity

4.8   (1) Unless provided elsewhere in this Regulation, the rated capacity or rated load of a machine or piece of equipment is that specified by the manufacturer of the machine or piece of equipment based on its design.

(2) The rated capacity or rated load must be certified by a professional engineer if

(a) the manufacturer's specification or other acceptable warranty cannot be produced,

(b) the equipment or machine has been modified in a manner which will change its rated capacity or rated load,

(c) wear, corrosion, damage or signs of fatigue are found which may reduce the rated capacity or rated load,

(d) the equipment or machine is used in a manner or for a purpose other than that for which it was originally designed, if the use will change the safe working load, or

(e) in the opinion of the Board, the provision of such certification is deemed necessary.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. C, s. 2.]

Inspection and maintenance records

4.9   (1) If this Regulation requires a machine or piece of equipment to have an inspection and maintenance record, then an effective written or other permanent recording system or log must be immediately available to the equipment operator and to any other person involved with inspection and maintenance of the equipment.

(2) The recording system must

(a) identify the make, model and serial number of the equipment, and the name and address of the current owner,

(b) contain an entry on each shift, signed by the operator of the machine or equipment, reporting the result of each start of shift inspection and safety check, and any observed defect, operating difficulty or need for maintenance occurring on the shift, and

(c) contain an entry signed by the person responsible for any test, inspection, modification, repair or maintenance performed on the equipment, summarizing the work done, indicating the status of the equipment or machine for further use, and if appropriate, noting where a detailed record of the test, inspection, modification, repair or maintenance can be obtained.

(3) If this Regulation requires a machine or piece of equipment to have inspection and maintenance records, then detailed reports of inspection, maintenance, repairs and modifications must be kept for the duration of the service life of the machine or equipment and must be reasonably available to the workplace and made available, upon request, to the operator and to anyone else involved in the operation, inspection, testing or maintenance of the equipment.

Authorization

4.10   (1) A machine or piece of equipment may only be operated by authorized persons.

(2) A person must not be authorized to operate a machine or piece of equipment until the person has been adequately instructed and trained, and has demonstrated an ability to safely operate it.

Startup

4.11   Before any equipment, machinery or work process is put into operation the persons responsible for doing so must ensure that

(a) safeguards and air contaminant controls required by this Regulation are in place and functioning, and

(b) no person will be exposed to undue risk by putting the equipment, machinery or work process into operation.

Circumvention of safeguards

4.12   A person must not intentionally remove, impair, or render ineffective any safeguard provided for the protection of workers, except as permitted by this Regulation.

Emergency Preparedness and Response

Risk assessment

4.13   (1) The employer must conduct a risk assessment in any workplace in which a need to rescue or evacuate workers may arise.

(2) If the risk assessment required by subsection (1) shows a need for evacuation or rescue, appropriate written procedures must be developed and implemented, and a worker assigned to coordinate their implementation.

(3) Written rescue and evacuation procedures are required for but not limited to

(a) work at high angles,

(b) work in confined spaces or where there is a risk of entrapment,

(c) work with hazardous substances,

(d) underground work,

(e) work on or over water, and

(f) workplaces where there are persons who require physical assistance to be moved.

Emergency procedures

4.14   (1) Emergency means of escape must be provided from any work area in which the malfunctioning of equipment or a work process could create an immediate danger to workers and the regular means of exit could become dangerous or unusable.

(2) Emergency exit routes must be designed and marked to provide quick and unimpeded exit.

(3) At least once each year emergency drills must be held to ensure awareness and effectiveness of emergency exit routes and procedures, and a record of the drills must be kept.

Repealed

4.15   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. E, s. 1.]

Training

4.16   (1) All workers must be given adequate instruction in the fire prevention and emergency evacuation procedures applicable to their workplace.

(2) Workers assigned to firefighting duties in their workplace must be given adequate training, by a qualified instructor, in fire suppression methods, fire prevention, emergency procedures, organization and chain of command, firefighting crew safety and communications applicable to their workplace.

(3) Retraining for firefighting duties must be provided periodically, but not less than once a year.

(4) A worker not covered by Part 31 [Firefighting], who is assigned to firefighting duties, must be physically capable of performing the assigned duties safely and effectively before being permitted to do them.

Notification of fire departments

4.17   (1) An employer having at a workplace hazardous products covered by WHMIS, explosives, pesticides, radioactive material, consumer products or hazardous wastes in quantities which may endanger firefighters, must ensure the local fire department is notified of the nature and location of the hazardous materials or substances and methods to be used in their safe handling.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a workplace

(a) where materials are kept on site for less than 15 days if the employer ensures an alternative effective means for notification of fire departments is in place in the event of fire or other emergency, or

(b) which is not within the service area of a fire department.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 2.]

Notification of utility service providers

4.18   If work activities conducted by or on behalf of an employer cause a utility service to be hit or damaged, the employer must notify the owner of the utility service without delay.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. D, s. 2.]

Impairment

Physical or mental impairment

4.19   (1) A worker with a physical or mental impairment which may affect the worker's ability to safely perform assigned work must inform his or her supervisor or employer of the impairment, and must not knowingly do work where the impairment may create an undue risk to the worker or anyone else.

(2) A worker must not be assigned to activities where a reported or observed impairment may create an undue risk to the worker or anyone else.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 21.]

Impairment by alcohol, drug or other substance

4.20   (1) A person must not enter or remain at any workplace while the person's ability to work is affected by alcohol, a drug or other substance so as to endanger the person or anyone else.

(2) The employer must not knowingly permit a person to remain at any workplace while the person's ability to work is affected by alcohol, a drug or other substance so as to endanger the person or anyone else.

(3) A person must not remain at a workplace if the person's behaviour is affected by alcohol, a drug or other substance so as to create an undue risk to workers, except where such a workplace has as one of its purposes the treatment or confinement of such persons.

Working Alone or in Isolation

Definition

4.20.1   In sections 4.20.2 to 4.23, "to work alone or in isolation" means to work in circumstances where assistance would not be readily available to the worker

(a) in case of an emergency, or

(b) in case the worker is injured or in ill health.

[en. B.C. Reg. 318/2007, s. 1.]

Hazard identification, elimination and control

4.20.2   (1) Before a worker is assigned to work alone or in isolation, the employer must identify any hazards to that worker.

(2) Before a worker starts a work assignment with a hazard identified under subsection (1), the employer must take measures

(a) to eliminate the hazard, and

(b) if it is not practicable to eliminate the hazard, to minimize the risk from the hazard.

(3) For purposes of subsection (2) (b), the employer must minimize the risk from the hazard to the lowest level practicable using engineering controls, administrative controls or a combination of engineering and administrative controls.

[en. B.C. Reg. 318/2007, s. 1.]

Procedures for checking well-being of worker

4.21   (1) The employer must develop and implement a written procedure for checking the well-being of a worker assigned to work alone or in isolation.

(2) The procedure for checking a worker's well-being must include the time interval between checks and the procedure to follow in case the worker cannot be contacted, including provisions for emergency rescue.

(3) A person must be designated to establish contact with the worker at predetermined intervals and the results must be recorded by the person.

(4) In addition to checks at regular intervals, a check at the end of the work shift must be done.

(5) The procedure for checking a worker's well-being, including time intervals between the checks, must be developed in consultation with the joint committee or worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

(6) Time intervals for checking a worker's well-being must be developed in consultation with the worker assigned to work alone or in isolation.

[am. B.C. Reg. 318/2007, s. 2.]

Training

4.22   A worker described in section 4.21 (1) and any person assigned to check on the worker must be trained in the written procedure for checking the worker's well-being.

[am. B.C. Reg. 318/2007, s. 3.]

Late night retail safety procedures and requirements

4.22.1   (1) In this section:

"late night hours" means any time between 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.;

"late night retail premises" means

(a) a gas station or other retail fueling outlet, or

(b) a convenience store or any other retail store where goods are sold directly to consumers

that is open to the public for late night hours;

"violence prevention program" means a program implemented under subsection (2) (b) (iii).

(2) If a worker is assigned to work alone or in isolation in late night retail premises and there is any risk of harm from a violent act to the worker, then, in addition to any other obligations the employer has under sections 4.20.2 to 4.23 and 4.28 to 4.30,

(a) the employer must develop and implement a written procedure to ensure the worker's safety in handling money, and

(b) when that worker is assigned to work late night hours, the employer must also do one or more of the following:

(i) ensure that the worker is physically separated from the public by a locked door or barrier that prevents physical contact with or access to the worker;

(ii) assign one or more workers to work with the worker during that worker's assignment;

(iii) implement a violence prevention program in accordance with subsections (2.1) to (2.3).

(2.1) A violence prevention program must include procedures, policies and work environment arrangements necessary to ensure that all of the following requirements are met:

(a) there is a time lock safe on the premises that cannot be opened during late night hours;

(b) cash and lottery tickets that are not reasonably required in order to operate during late night hours are stored in the time lock safe referred to in paragraph (a);

(c) there is good visibility both into and out of the premises;

(d) there is limited access to the inside of the premises;

(e) the premises is monitored by video surveillance;

(f) there are signs on the premises, visible to the public, indicating that

(i) the safe on the premises is a time lock safe that cannot be opened during late night hours,

(ii) there is a limited amount of accessible cash and lottery tickets on the premises, and

(iii) the premises is monitored by video surveillance;

(g) a worker described in subsection (2)

(i) is at least 19 years of age, and

(ii) is provided with a personal emergency transmitter that is monitored by

(A) the employer, or

(B) a security company or other person designated by the employer.

(2.2) By the end of the first year of the implementation of a violence prevention program and by the end of every second year after that first year, the employer must receive a security audit report, in writing, from an independent qualified person confirming that the program meets all of the requirements under subsection (2.1).

(2.3) The written security audit report referred to in subsection (2.2) must be

(a) retained by the employer, and

(b) posted by the employer in the workplace

for a period beginning on or immediately after the date the report is received and ending no earlier than the date on which the next report is posted.

(3) The employer must train a worker described in subsection (2) in

(a) the written procedure referred to in subsection (2) (a), and

(b) if the employer implements a violence prevention program, the procedures, policies and work environment arrangements referred to in subsection (2.1).

(4) A worker described in subsection (2) must

(a) follow the written procedure referred to in subsection (2) (a), and

(b) if the employer implements a violence prevention program,

(i) follow the procedures, policies and work environment arrangements referred to in subsection (2.1), and

(ii) wear, during late night hours, the personal emergency transmitter referred to in subsection (2.1) (g) (ii).

[en. B.C. Reg. 318/2007, s. 4; am. B.C. Regs. 312/2010, App. B; 230/2011, s. 1.]

Mandatory prepayment for fuel

4.22.2   An employer must require that customers prepay for fuel sold in gas stations and other retail fueling outlets.

[en. B.C. Reg. 318/2007, s. 4.]

Annual review of procedures

4.23   The procedures referred to in sections 4.21 and 4.22.1 (2) (a) and, if a violence prevention program is implemented, the procedures, policies and work environment arrangements referred to in section 4.22.1 (2.1), must be reviewed at least annually, or more frequently if there is

(a) a change in work environment arrangements that could adversely affect

(i) the effectiveness of the violence prevention program, or

(ii) a worker's well-being or safety, or

(b) a report that the procedures, policies or work environment arrangements, as applicable, are not working effectively.

[en. B.C. Reg. 230/2011, s. 2.]

Workplace Conduct

Definition

4.24   In sections 4.25 and 4.26, "improper activity or behaviour" includes

(a) the attempted or actual exercise by a worker towards another worker of any physical force so as to cause injury, and includes any threatening statement or behaviour which gives the worker reasonable cause to believe he or she is at risk of injury, and

(b) horseplay, practical jokes, unnecessary running or jumping or similar conduct.

Prohibition

4.25   A person must not engage in any improper activity or behaviour at a workplace that might create or constitute a hazard to themselves or to any other person.

Investigation

4.26   Improper activity or behaviour must be reported and investigated as required by Part 3 (Rights and Responsibilities).

Violence in the Workplace

Definition

4.27   In sections 4.28 to 4.31, "violence" means the attempted or actual exercise by a person, other than a worker, of any physical force so as to cause injury to a worker, and includes any threatening statement or behaviour which gives a worker reasonable cause to believe that he or she is at risk of injury.

Risk assessment

4.28   (1) A risk assessment must be performed in any workplace in which a risk of injury to workers from violence arising out of their employment may be present.

(2) The risk assessment must include the consideration of

(a) previous experience in that workplace,

(b) occupational experience in similar workplaces, and

(c) the location and circumstances in which work will take place.

Procedures and policies

4.29   If a risk of injury to workers from violence is identified by an assessment performed under section 4.28 the employer must

(a) establish procedures, policies and work environment arrangements to eliminate the risk to workers from violence, and

(b) if elimination of the risk to workers is not possible, establish procedures, policies and work environment arrangements to minimize the risk to workers.

(c) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. D, s. 1 (c).]

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 22; 312/2003, App. D, s. 1.]

Instruction of workers

4.30   (1) An employer must inform workers who may be exposed to the risk of violence of the nature and extent of the risk.

(2) The duty to inform workers in subsection (1) includes a duty to provide information related to the risk of violence from persons who have a history of violent behaviour and whom workers are likely to encounter in the course of their work.

(3) The employer must instruct workers who may be exposed to the risk of violence in

(a) the means for recognition of the potential for violence,

(b) the procedures, policies and work environment arrangements which have been developed to minimize or effectively control the risk to workers from violence,

(c) the appropriate response to incidents of violence, including how to obtain assistance, and

(d) procedures for reporting, investigating and documenting incidents of violence.

Advice to consult physician

4.31   (1)-(2) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. D, s. 2 (a).]

(3) The employer must ensure that a worker reporting an injury or adverse symptom as a result of an incident of violence is advised to consult a physician of the worker's choice for treatment or referral.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. D, s. 2.]

Work Area Requirements

Access to work areas

4.32   There must be a safe way of entering and leaving each place where work is performed and a worker must not use another way, if the other way is hazardous.

Arrangement of work areas

4.33   (1) A work area must be arranged to allow the safe movement of people, equipment and materials.

(2) If, to ensure safety, an aisle or passageway is designated for pedestrian traffic, the route must be clearly indicated by markings or other effective means and, where practicable, floor or grade markings must be used.

Restricted entry

4.34   Hazardous areas not intended to be accessible to workers must be secured by locked doors or equivalent means of security, and must not be entered unless safe work procedures are developed and followed.

Door installations

4.35   (1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 2 (a).]

(2) If a door installed in a workplace swings towards a stair, the full arc of its swing must be over a landing.

(3) A double-acting swing door must permit a person approaching the door to see any person approaching from the opposite side so as not to endanger their safety.

(4) A glass or transparent door must have hardware, bars or markings so that its presence and position are readily apparent.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 2.]

Glass

4.36   (1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 3.]

(2) A panel, window or sidelight made of glass or similar transparent material, which could be mistaken for a doorway, must have bars or markings so that its presence and position are readily apparent.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 3.]

Restricted visibility

4.37   A worker must not be permitted to enter or work in an area if visibility in the area is restricted by the presence of smoke, steam or other substance in the atmosphere, unless appropriate safe work procedures are followed.

Extreme temperatures

4.38   (1) An open flame or other high temperature or extreme low temperature source or surface, which could cause a burn or other injury, must be positioned or shielded to prevent contact by workers.

(2) If an extreme temperature source is necessarily exposed due to the work process, safe work procedures must be established, and workers must be instructed in those procedures and must wear appropriate clothing and personal protective equipment.

Slipping and tripping hazards

4.39   (1) Floors, platforms, ramps, stairs and walkways available for use by workers must be maintained in a state of good repair and kept free of slipping and tripping hazards.

(2) If such areas are taken out of service the employer must take reasonable means for preventing entry or use.

Wet floors

4.40   If a work process results in a liquid accumulating on the floor or grade surface in a work area and the liquid creates a slipping or other hazard, floor drains or other suitable means must be used to control the hazard.

Waste material

4.41   Refuse, spills and waste material must not be allowed to accumulate so as to constitute a hazard.

Cleaning with compressed air

4.42   (1) Compressed air or steam must not be used for blowing dust, chips, or other substances from equipment, materials and structures if any person could be exposed to the jet, or to the material it expels or propels and an injury or health hazard due to fire, explosion or other cause is likely to result.

(2) Subject to subsection (4) compressed air may not be used for blowing harmful or hazardous dusts or other harmful substances from clothing being worn by workers.

(3) If clothing is to be cleaned before leaving the work area, suitable cleaning equipment must be used.

(4) Compressed air may be used in specially designated areas for blowing dusts or other substances from clothing being worn by workers, provided that

(a) the substances have an exposure limit greater than 1.0 mg/m3, as established by section 5.48,

(b) appropriate respirators and eye protection are worn, and

(c) the compressed air supply pressure is limited to a pressure of 70 kPa gauge (10 psig), or safety nozzles which have the same pressure limiting effect are used.

[am. B.C. Regs. 315/2003, App. A, s. 2; 312/2010, App. G, s. 1.]

Storing and Handling Materials

Stacking materials

4.43   (1) Material and equipment must be placed, stacked or stored in a stable and secure manner.

(2) Stacked material or containers must be stabilized as necessary by interlocking, strapping or other effective means of restraint to protect the safety of workers.

Storage racks

4.43.1   (1) In this section, "storage rack" means a combination of steel frames, beams and associated accessories used, once assembled into a structure, to support materials and products, including, for example, a pallet rack or cantilever rack, but excludes shelving and display fixtures used for retail purposes.

(2) This section applies in respect of a storage rack that is

(a) 2.4 m (8 ft) or taller in height, as measured from the floor to the top of the highest shelf level of the storage rack, or

(b) under 2.4 m (8 ft) in height, if the materials and products are loaded on or unloaded off the storage rack by other than manual means.

(3) The employer must ensure that a storage rack in the workplace is

(a) capable of safely supporting the items stored on it,

(b) designed and constructed in accordance with good engineering practice, and

(c) used in accordance with the specifications and instructions of the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

(4) The employer must ensure that a qualified person installs and uninstalls the storage rack, in whole or in part, in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

(5) The employer must ensure that the instructions of the manufacturer or a professional engineer for safely loading, unloading and maintaining the storage rack are readily available in the workplace to workers.

(6) The employer must ensure that the rated capacity of the storage rack is clearly posted near the storage rack and readily visible to workers.

(7) The employer must ensure that any structural modification, including reconfiguration, of the storage rack is carried out in accordance with the specifications of the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

(8) The employer must ensure that a qualified person

(a) inspects the storage rack

(i) for wear, corrosion, damage, missing or incompatible parts, and signs of fatigue, and

(ii) at regular intervals that will prevent the development of unsafe working conditions,

(b) makes a record of the results of each inspection, and

(c) provides the record to the employer.

(9) The employer must ensure that, with respect to the storage rack,

(a) regular maintenance is done, and

(b) wear, corrosion, damage, missing or incompatible parts, and signs of fatigue are repaired or replaced in accordance with the specifications and instructions of the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

[en. B.C. Reg. 143/2017.]

Entrapment

4.44   A worker must not enter or remain in any place where there is a danger of entrapment or engulfment in loose materials or from other circumstances unless

(a) safe access and a safe work area is provided by catwalks, walkways, barriers or other means, or

(b) measures are taken, where practicable, to control the risk of entrapment or engulfment and, if the risk is not eliminated, the worker uses a lifeline and harness of a type that will keep the worker in a position so as to be able to be rescued and is continuously tended by a standby person who is equipped for and capable of effecting immediate rescue.

Falling materials

4.45   An area in which material may be dropped, dumped or spilled must be guarded to prevent inadvertent entry by workers, or protected by adequate covers and guarding.

Ergonomics (MSI) Requirements

The purpose of sections 4.46 to 4.53 is to eliminate or, if that is not practicable, minimize the risk of musculoskeletal injury to workers.

Definition

4.46   In sections 4.47 to 4.53 (the Ergonomics (MSI) Requirements), "musculoskeletal injury" or "MSI" means an injury or disorder of the muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, nerves, blood vessels or related soft tissue including a sprain, strain and inflammation, that may be caused or aggravated by work.

Risk identification

4.47   The employer must identify factors in the workplace that may expose workers to a risk of musculoskeletal injury (MSI).

Risk assessment

4.48   When factors that may expose workers to a risk of MSI have been identified, the employer must ensure that the risk to workers is assessed.

Risk factors

4.49   The following factors must be considered, where applicable, in the identification and assessment of the risk of MSI:

(a) the physical demands of work activities, including

(i) force required,

(ii) repetition,

(iii) duration,

(iv) work postures, and

(v) local contact stresses;

(b) aspects of the layout and condition of the workplace or workstation, including

(i) working reaches,

(ii) working heights,

(iii) seating, and

(iv) floor surfaces;

(c) the characteristics of objects handled, including

(i) size and shape,

(ii) load condition and weight distribution, and

(iii) container, tool and equipment handles;

(d) the environmental conditions, including cold temperature;

(e) the following characteristics of the organization of work:

(i) work-recovery cycles;

(ii) task variability;

(iii) work rate.

Risk control

4.50   (1) The employer must eliminate or, if that is not practicable, minimize the risk of MSI to workers.

(2) Personal protective equipment may only be used as a substitute for engineering or administrative controls if it is used in circumstances in which those controls are not practicable.

(3) The employer must, without delay, implement interim control measures when the introduction of permanent control measures will be delayed.

Education and training

4.51   (1) The employer must ensure that a worker who may be exposed to a risk of MSI is educated in risk identification related to the work, including the recognition of early signs and symptoms of MSIs and their potential health effects.

(2) The employer must ensure that a worker to be assigned to work which requires specific measures to control the risk of MSI is trained in the use of those measures, including, where applicable, work procedures, mechanical aids and personal protective equipment.

Evaluation

4.52   (1) The employer must monitor the effectiveness of the measures taken to comply with the Ergonomics (MSI) Requirements and ensure they are reviewed at least annually.

(2) When the monitoring required by subsection (1) identifies deficiencies, they must be corrected without undue delay.

Consultation

4.53   (1) The employer must consult with the joint committee or the worker health and safety representative, as applicable, with respect to the following when they are required by the Ergonomics (MSI) Requirements:

(a) risk identification, assessment and control;

(b) the content and provision of worker education and training;

(c) the evaluation of the compliance measures taken.

(2) The employer must, when performing a risk assessment, consult with

(a) workers with signs or symptoms of MSI, and

(b) a representative sample of the workers who are required to carry out the work being assessed.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 23.]

Work Area Guards and Handrails

Definitions

4.54   In sections 4.54 to 4.63:

"guard" means a protective barrier around an opening in a floor or along the open sides of stairs or a ramp, landing, balcony, mezzanine, raised walkway or any other area to prevent a fall to a lower level, or inadvertent entry into a dangerous area;

"guardrail" means a guard consisting of a top rail 102 cm to 112 cm (40 in. to 44 in.) above the work surface, and a midrail located approximately midway between the underside of the top rail and the top of the toeboard, if one is provided, or the work surface if no toeboard is provided.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. E, s. 1.]

Guardrail locations

4.55   An area accessible to workers must have guards or guardrails installed in any of the following circumstances:

(a) if a raised floor, open-sided floor, mezzanine, gallery, balcony, work platform, ramp, walkway, or runway is 122 cm (4 ft.) or more above the adjacent floor or grade level;

(b) on both sides of any walkway over or adjacent to any substance which is a hazard if a worker fell in, or on it, or which is over machinery or work areas;

(c) around the perimeter of any open container or containment area such as an open vat, bin, tank or pit which is 122 cm (4 ft.) or more in depth and which has sides that do not extend at least as high as required for a guardrail above the adjacent grade or work surface;

(d) if a stairway ends in direct proximity to dangerous traffic or other hazard to prevent inadvertent entry into the dangerous area.

Exceptions

4.56   Section 4.55 does not apply

(a) to the front edge of a loading dock or to the viewing edge of a performance stage, and to parts of the scenic units which will be visible to the audience during a rehearsal or performance, provided effective measures are taken to ensure that workers are protected from injury,

(b) during the construction, demolition, renovation or modification of a work area provided that

(i) access is restricted only to the workers involved in the activity, and

(ii) the requirements of Part 11 [Fall Protection] are followed, or

(c) to a movable work platform or scaffold, as those terms are defined in section 13.1, if the movable work platform or scaffold meets the requirements set out in section 13.2 (1) (a) and (b) and (2) that apply in respect of guardrails on the movable work platform or scaffold.

[am. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. B, s. 1.]

Elevated workers

4.57   If a worker is employed on stilts or work platforms, or is otherwise elevated above the floor, and the effective height of guardrails, walls, or barricades is thus reduced to less than the height specified in section 4.54, additional guardrails must be installed or a personal fall protection system must be used in accordance with the relevant requirements contained in Part 11 [Fall Protection].

Specifications for guards and guardrails

4.58   (1) Guards in a building must be appropriate for the use and occupancy of the area.

(2) Guards in areas not part of a building must meet the applicable criteria of subsections (3) to (5), or other standard acceptable to the Board.

(3) Unless otherwise permitted by subsections (4) and (4.1), guardrails must be installed to withstand a load applied horizontally and normal to the span of the rail, of 550 N (125 lb.) applied at any point along the rail, and a vertical, downward load of 1.5 kN per m (100 lb. per ft.) along the top rail, but the horizontal and vertical loads need not be considered to act simultaneously.

(4) Guardrails temporarily installed during the construction, demolition, maintenance or renovation of a work area must be able to withstand a load of 550 N (125 lb.) applied perpendicular to the span in a horizontal or vertically downward direction at any point on the top rail, or be built to the criteria of subsection (5).

(4.1) If part or all of the top rail or a midrail of a guardrail that is temporarily installed during the construction, demolition, maintenance or renovation of a work area is made of fibre rope, wire rope, chain or other non-rigid material, that part of the guardrail must meet the requirements of WorkSafeBC Standard — Guardrails using rope or other non-rigid material, as set out in Schedule 4-A to this Part.

(5) Unless designed by a professional engineer, temporary wooden guardrails on floors and platforms must meet the following criteria:

(a) posts must be spaced not more than 2.4 m (8 ft.) apart, except a scaffold may have posts spaced not more than 3 m (10 ft.) apart;

(b) wooden top rails must be at least 38 mm x 89 mm (2 in. x 4 in. nominal) lumber for a span of up to 2.4 m between supports, and at least 38 mm x 140 mm (2 in. x 6 in. nominal) lumber for a span of 2.4 m to 3 m between supports;

(c) wooden midrails must be 19 mm x 140 mm (1 in. x 6 in. nominal) or 38 mm x 89 mm (2 in. x 4 in. nominal) lumber;

(d) wooden rails must be secured to the tops or inner sides of their vertical supports;

(e) wooden guardrail posts must be at least 38 mm x 89 mm (2 in. x 4 in. nominal) lumber, and must be installed with the narrow dimension facing the open edge;

(f) plastic or wire mesh fencing of adequate strength may be used in place of the midrail, but posts and top rails must comply with the requirements of this section and such fencing must be secured in place.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. E, s. 2; 312/2010, App. E, s. 2.]

Temporary removal of guardrails

4.58.1   (1) If a guardrail must be removed to accommodate work,

(a) only that portion of the guardrail necessary to allow the work to be done may be removed, and

(b) workers exposed to a fall hazard must be protected by another fall protection system when the guardrail is absent.

(2) The guardrail must be replaced

(a) when the unguarded area is left unattended, and

(b) after the work is completed if the circumstances still require guardrails.

[en. B.C. Reg. 420/2004, s. 1.]

Floor and roof openings

4.59   (1) A pit or other opening in a floor, walkway, roof or other area accessible to workers, which is a danger to workers, must be securely covered with a cover of adequate size and strength or guarded by fixed or movable guardrails, which must be identified as such and kept in place except when necessarily removed to work in the opening or pit.

(2) If compliance with subsection (1) is not practicable for a vehicle service pit, the area around the perimeter of the pit must be marked in a high visibility colour extending back at least 1 m (3.3 ft.) from the edge of the pit, and the marking coating or material must provide a skid resistant surface.

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply to a trap door in a performance stage or scenic unit that will be visible to the audience during a rehearsal or performance, provided that effective measures are taken to protect performers and other workers from injury.

(4) If a worker must enter an area not normally accessible and that has openings that are a danger, such openings must be guarded or personal fall protection must be used while the worker is in the area.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. D, s. 3.]

Toeboards

4.60   (1) Floor openings, elevated walkways and platforms must have toeboards if there is a danger from tools, materials, equipment and debris falling off the edge of the work surface, or there is a danger of slipping off the work surface due to the environment or work practices being used.

(2) The top of a toeboard must be at least 10 cm (4 in.) above the floor or platform, and the space between the bottom of the toeboard and the floor or platform must not exceed 13 mm (1/2 in.).

(3) If material is stacked or stored on a platform or walkway, or near a floor opening, toeboards must be increased in height or solid or mesh panels of appropriate height must be installed to prevent the material from falling.

(4) Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to a walkway or a platform that is on a performance stage or scenic unit and will be visible to the audience during a rehearsal or performance, provided that effective measures are taken to protect performers and other workers from injury.

Walkways

4.61   Elevated walkways must be at least 50 cm (20 in.) wide, and safe access to walkways must be provided by means of stairs, ramps or fixed ladders.

Handrails on stairways

4.62   (1) Stairs with more than 4 risers must have continuous handrails on

(a) any open side of the stairway,

(b) one side of enclosed stairways 112 cm (44 in.) or less in width, and

(c) both sides of enclosed stairways over 112 cm (44 in.) wide.

(2) The top of a handrail must be 76 cm to 92 cm (30 in. to 36 in.) above the stair tread, measured vertically from the nose of the tread, and the height must not vary on any flight or succession of flights of stairs.

(3) A handrail on an open side of a stairway must have a midrail located approximately midway between the top of the handrail and the nose of the stair tread.

(4) A handrail must be able to withstand a load of 1.3 kN (300 lbs) applied vertically or horizontally at any point along the handrail.

Vehicle travel areas

4.63   A curb must be installed, where practicable, whenever there is a danger of a vehicle or other equipment running off the edge of an elevated area.

Illumination

Definitions

4.64   In sections 4.64 to 4.69:

"brightness ratio" means for any 2 surfaces in the field of vision, the ratio of the luminance of one surface to the luminance of the other surface, expressed as a percentage;

"contrast" means the ratio of the luminance or light coming from an object and the luminance of its immediate background;

"general lighting" means an array of light fixtures that provides a fairly uniform illumination level for a large area, sometimes over the whole workplace, exclusive of any provision for special local lighting;

"glare" means brightness within the field of vision that causes eye fatigue or loss in visual performance;

"illumination level" means the amount of light falling on a surface;

"local lighting" means a light fixture or array of fixtures that provides illumination over a small area such as a service counter in a warehouse, without providing any significant general lighting in the surrounding area;

"luminance" means the amount of light reflected by a surface at a given angle;

"reflectance" means the ratio of the light reflected from a surface to that falling on the surface, expressed as a percentage.

Illumination levels

4.65   (1) Except as otherwise provided in this section and section 4.69, an employer must provide and maintain minimum illumination levels to ensure safe working conditions, safe passage and the identification of hazards or obstructions as follows:

(a) 22 lux (2 fc) in areas of low activity, such as parking lots, building exteriors, outside areas and basement areas housing machinery, but which are not regular task areas;

(b) 54 lux (5 fc) in areas of high activity, such as frequently used walkways and building access and egress points.

(1.1) Cap lamps or other local sources of illumination acceptable to the Board must be used if the light intensity in a work area is less than 22 lux (2 fc) and it is impracticable to provide illumination by any other means.

(2) For tasks which require the ability to distinguish detail an employer must provide and maintain illumination as required by Table 4-1.

(3) For work processes which require lower illumination levels than those specified in subsections (1) and (2), such as photographic darkrooms, fish hatching rooms and poultry catching operations, the employer may use other effective means to ensure the safety of workers.

[am. B.C. Reg. 20/2008, App. A, s. 60.]

Table 4-1: Illumination levels for task categories

Task categoryExamples1Minimum2 illumination level
in lux
1. Simple orientation for short temporary visitsInactive storage, waiting areas, VDT screens, log loading and unloading.50
2. Working spaces where visual tasks are only occasionally performedStairways, freight elevators, truck loading, active bulk storage.100
3. Visual tasks of high contrast or large sizeBakery mixing rooms, hospital central (clean) linen rooms, locker rooms, reading good quality text, casual reading, simple assembly, hand or simple spray painting, rough lumber grading, rough woodworking and benchwork.200
4. Visual tasks of medium contrast or small sizeHair styling shops, kitchens, vehicle repair garages, sawmill filing room (work areas), reading poor quality text, prolonged or critical reading, medium bench or machine work, mail sorting, fine hand painting and finishing, fine woodworking and finishing.500
5. Visual tasks of low contrast or very small sizeDifficult assembly tasks, difficult inspections, weaving, clothing alteration, finished lumber grading.1 000
6. Visual tasks of low contrast and very small size over a prolonged periodVery difficult assembly tasks, sewing, fine bench or machine work, extra-fine hand painting and finishing.2 000
7. Very prolonged and exacting visual tasksExacting assembly or inspection, extra fine bench or machine work, precision manual arc-welding.5 000
8. Very special visual tasks of extremely low contrast and small sizeVery detailed cloth product inspection and examination.10 000
Note 1: Further guidance in determining task categories that apply to specific work areas and activities is contained in the IES Handbook. This publication also provides information on acceptable measures to control brightness, reflectance and glare.
Note 2: The lux is the metric unit of light measurement, and replaces the footcandle (fc), which was the traditional imperial unit of measurement. One lux equals about one tenth of a footcandle. For example, the minimum illumination in footcandles for task category number 4, which is common in the office environment, is about 50 footcandles.

Means of illumination

4.66   The lighting required by section 4.65 must be provided by general or local lighting, or an effective combination of the two.

Brightness, reflectance and glare

4.67   As far as practicable, the workplace must be designed and maintained in such a manner to adequately control

(a) brightness ratios,

(b) reflectance values, and

(c) glare.

Illumination measurement

4.68   (1) The measurement of illumination must be done in accordance with the procedures in the Lighting Handbook — Reference and Application, 8th Edition, 1993 (IES Handbook) published by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America.

(2) A photometer used to measure illumination levels must be colour and cosine corrected.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

Emergency lighting

4.69   (1) If failure of a lighting system would create conditions dangerous to the health and safety of workers, an emergency lighting system must be provided for the workplace and the exit routes.

(2) An emergency lighting system must provide dependable illumination while the primary lighting system is off to enable all emergency measures to be carried out, including

(a) emergency shutdown procedures, and

(b) evacuation of workers from the premises.

(3) An emergency lighting system in a fixed facility must meet the requirements of section 3.2.7 (Lighting and Emergency Power Systems) of the BC Building Code with regard to

(a) illumination level,

(b) use of recessed fixtures,

(c) duration of emergency lighting,

(d) the use of self-contained emergency lighting units, and

(e) emergency electrical power supply.

(4) The emergency lighting system must be inspected, tested and maintained to meet the requirements of section 6.5 (Emergency Power Systems and Unit Equipment for Emergency Lighting) of the BC Fire Code.

[am. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. B, s. 1.]

Indoor Air Quality

Application

4.70   Sections 4.71 to 4.80 apply to indoor or enclosed areas when occupied by workers, except

(a) a controlled atmosphere enclosure,

(b) a confined space, and

(c) when clearly impracticable, such as during some construction or renovation projects.

Submitting plans

4.71   An employer or the employer's agent must submit to the Board drawings and specifications for an existing or proposed ventilation system when requested by the Board.

Design and operation

4.72   (1) An employer must ensure that a ventilation system for the supply and distribution of air and removal of indoor air contaminants is designed, constructed and operated in accordance with

(a) established engineering principles, and

(b) ASHRAE Standard 62-1989, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality.

(2) An adequate supply of outdoor air must be provided to the workplace in accordance with Table 2 of ASHRAE Standard 62-1989.

(3) For a building ventilation system installed prior to 1989, an adequate supply of outdoor air must be provided in accordance with the ASHRAE standard in place at the time the ventilation system was designed.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

Building modifications

4.73   The owner of a building must permit an employer to install a ventilation system when required by this Part, provided that all such work is subject to the approval of the owner, acting reasonably.

Distribution

4.74   Outdoor air must be effectively distributed throughout the workplace.

Balancing

4.75   The ventilation system must be balanced to

(a) ensure that each space within the building receives an adequate allotment of outdoor air, and

(b) accommodate the actual or the normally anticipated occupancy of each space.

Ventilation openings

4.76   (1) A ventilation system must not be obstructed by material or equipment placed in front of the ventilation air intakes or discharge points.

(2) Outdoor air intakes must be located so that outdoor air entering the ventilation system does not contain any contaminant in a concentration greater than normal outdoor ambient air in that locality.

Discharged air

4.77   A ventilation system that discharges air from the work area must be designed to minimize the likelihood of exposing any worker at a workplace, including an adjacent workplace

(a) to an air contaminant in a concentration which exceeds either 10% of its applicable exposure limit in Part 5 (Chemical Agents and Biological Agents), or an acceptable ambient air quality standard established by an authority having jurisdiction over environmental air standards, whichever is greater, and

(b) where practicable, to an objectionable odour.

Preventive maintenance

4.78   (1) To maintain acceptable air quality, the employer or, if the employer is not responsible for maintenance of the ventilation system, the owner of the ventilation system, must establish an effective preventive maintenance program for the ventilation system.

(2) Preventive maintenance must include

(a) regular inspections

(i) of all critical components of the ventilation system, such as dampers, fans, belts, baffles, ductwork, diffusers and control systems, and

(ii) for conditions which would promote the growth of micro-organisms, such as water leaks or stagnant water pools,

(b) correction of any deficiencies found during the inspections carried out under paragraph (a),

(c) repair or replacement of malfunctioning and consumable components, such as filters and belts, and the cleaning of air distribution systems, ducts and dampers when necessary to correct an indoor air quality deficiency,

(d) adequate treatment of open water systems associated with ventilation equipment such as cooling towers and humidifiers, to control biological growth, and

(e) maintenance of combustion sources, such as furnaces, space heaters and water heaters to assure proper burning and exhausting of waste gases so that recirculation of gases to the workplace will not occur.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 24.]

Investigation

4.79   (1) The employer must ensure that the indoor air quality is investigated when

(a) complaints are reported,

(b) occupancy in the space changes substantially, or

(c) renovations involving significant changes to the ventilation system occur.

(2) An air quality investigation must include

(a) assessment of the ventilation rate, unless the indoor carbon dioxide level is less than 650 ppm above ambient outdoor levels,

(b) inspection of the ventilation system as required in section 4.78 (2),

(c) sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints, and

(d) a record of the complaint, the findings of the investigation, and any actions taken.

Temperature and humidity

4.80   The employer must ensure that temperature and humidity levels within the indoor work environment are maintained within acceptable comfort ranges, as far as is practicable.

Environmental Tobacco Smoke and E-Cigarette Vapour

Definitions

4.80.1   In sections 4.81 and 4.82, "activated e-cigarette", "e-cigarette" and "tobacco" have the same meaning as in the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Act.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. C, s. 2.]

Controlling exposure

4.81   Subject to section 2.41 of the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Act and section 4.23 (2) (c) of the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Regulation, an employer must control the exposure of workers to environmental tobacco smoke and e­cigarette vapour at a workplace by doing all of the following:

(a) prohibiting the following activities in the workplace:

(i) smoking tobacco;

(ii) holding lighted tobacco;

(iii) using an e-cigarette;

(iv) holding an activated e-cigarette;

(b) subject to section 4.22 (3) of the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Regulation, restricting the activities referred to in paragraph (a) of this section to a safe outdoor location that is a minimum of 6 m from a doorway, window or air intake of an indoor workplace;

(c) except as permitted under section 4.82 of this regulation, prohibiting working in an indoor area where the activities referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are allowed under section 4.23 (2) (a) or (b) of the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Regulation.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. C, s. 3.]

Exceptions

4.82   (1) An employer must ensure that a worker does not work in an indoor area where the activities referred to in section 4.81 (a) are permitted under section 4.23 (2) (a) or (b) of the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Regulation unless

(a) the worker must enter the area to respond to an emergency endangering life, health or property,

(b) the worker must enter the area to investigate for illegal activity, or

(c) the tobacco smoke or e-cigarette vapour has been effectively removed.

(2) If necessary to prevent tobacco smoke or e-cigarette vapour from entering a workplace, a room where the activities referred to in section 4.81 (a) are permitted under section 4.23 (2) (a) of the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Regulation must be provided with a separate, non-recirculating exhaust ventilation system that

(a) is designed in accordance with expected occupancy rates,

(b) maintains adequate air flows from areas in which smoking tobacco or using activated e-cigarettes is prohibited to areas in which smoking tobacco or using activated e-cigarettes is permitted,

(c) discharges directly to the outdoors, and

(d) meets all other requirements, specified in the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers Standard 62-1989, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, for a lounge in which smoking tobacco or using activated e-cigarettes is permitted.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. C, s. 3.]

Repealed

4.83   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 258/2008, App. B, s. 2.]

Occupational Environment Requirements

Eating areas

4.84   (1) Workers must not keep or consume food in an area of a workplace where it could become unwholesome because of workplace contaminants.

(2) The employer must ensure that an area suitable for the storage and consumption of food is provided for workers if

(a) there is a risk that food stored or consumed at a workplace may become unwholesome because of workplace contaminants, or

(b) food storage or consumption is restricted or prohibited at the workplace.

[en. B.C. Reg. 421/2004.]

Washroom facilities

4.85   (1) Except as provided by subsection (2), the employer must ensure that a sufficient number of plumbed washroom facilities are readily available for workers.

(2) If plumbed washroom facilities cannot be provided because of the nature of the workplace or the nature of the work in which the worker is involved, the employer must

(a) provide access to portable washroom and hand-washing facilities, or

(b) make such other reasonable arrangements to accommodate workers as the circumstances allow, if access to portable washroom and hand-washing facilities cannot be provided.

(3) If washroom facilities are provided they must be

(a) maintained in proper working order,

(b) kept clean and sanitary, and

(c) provided with the supplies necessary for their use.

[en. B.C. Reg. 421/2004.]

Change areas

4.86   If the employer requires the worker to change into protective work clothing at the workplace, the employer must ensure that adequate change areas are provided.

[en. B.C. Reg. 421/2004.]

Unsafe water

4.87   The employer must display at every plumbed non-potable water source from which a person might reasonably believe he or she can safely drink, a notice that the water is unfit for human consumption.

[en. B.C. Reg. 421/2004.]

Repealed

4.88-
4.106
 
Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 421/2004.]

Schedule 4-A

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. E, s. 3.]

(section 4.58 [specifications for guards and guardrails])

WorkSafeBC Standard — Guardrails Using Rope or Other Non-rigid Material

Scope

1   This standard sets out the minimum requirements for the design and use of a guardrail system temporarily installed in a workplace and made using a rope rail for part or all of the top rail or midrail of the guardrail system.

Definitions

2   In this standard:

"fall protection system" has the same meaning as in section 11.1 of this Regulation;

"guardrail" has the same meaning as in section 4.54 of this Regulation;

"rope rail" means a rail made of fibre rope, wire rope, chain or other non-rigid material.

Performance and material requirements

3   (1) A rope rail must be able to withstand a load of 550 N (125 lb.) applied in any direction at any point on the rope rail.

(2) A guardrail system using a rope rail must be installed with sufficient setback from the outer face of the parapet, the floor opening or the open edge of the floor or work surface, as the case may be, or from any other hazard, such that when the rope rail is subjected to a horizontal load of 550 N (125 lb.) applied at any point, the rope rail will not deflect

(a) past the outer face of the parapet,

(b) past the edge of the floor opening,

(c) past the open edge of the floor or work surface, or

(d) into the hazard.

(3) A rope rail must be made of a material that will remain stable and functional, having regard to the following:

(a) climatic conditions;

(b) exposure to

(i) high temperature sources, or

(ii) by-products of high temperature processes such as welding or cutting;

(c) chemical exposures that may occur due to

(i) the location of the workplace where the guardrail system is to be installed, or

(ii) the work that will be taking place around or near the guardrail system.

(4) A rope rail must not be made of natural fibre rope or other material relying on natural fibre for tensile strength.

Engineering requirements

4   (1) A rope rail must be installed and used in accordance with written instructions from a professional engineer.

(2) The written instructions required by subsection (1) must include the following:

(a) the seal and signature of the professional engineer providing the written instructions;

(b) the address of and location in the workplace where the guardrail system is to be used;

(c) the name of each employer, prime contractor or owner for whom the written instructions were prepared;

(d) a description of the guardrail system or an illustration for its configuration;

(e) details for the connection of the rope rail to supports and anchors;

(f) details on the size and grade of rope and all required rigging hardware to be used;

(g) details for corner posts and points where rope terminations occur;

(h) the maximum span permitted between supports;

(i) the tension required in the rope and the means to achieve it;

(j) the means for testing rope tension during inspections of the system.

(3) The written instructions for a guardrail system intended for use at a number of workplaces of similar design and construction must include the following:

(a) the seal and signature of the professional engineer providing the written instructions;

(b) a description of the type of structure where the guardrail system may be used;

(c) the name of each employer, prime contractor or owner for whom the written instructions were prepared;

(d) a description of the guardrail system or an illustration for its configuration;

(e) details for the connection of the rope rail to supports and anchors;

(f) details on the size and grade of rope and all required rigging hardware to be used;

(g) details for corner posts and points where rope terminations occur;

(h) the maximum span permitted between supports;

(i) the tension required in the rope and the means to achieve it;

(j) the means for testing rope tension during inspections of the system.

(4) The written instructions must be available at the workplace when the guardrail system is being installed and while the rope rail is in place.

Installation and use requirements

5   (1) A worker involved in the installation, maintenance or removal of a guardrail system described in section 1 [scope] must use a fall protection system if required by Part 11 [Fall Protection] of this regulation.

(2) A rope rail meeting this standard is intended for use only as a guardrail and must not be used as a horizontal lifeline unless a professional engineer specifically authorizes such use and provides written instructions for such use.

(3) If the lack of visibility of a rope rail is a hazard, high visibility coloured markers or flagging must be installed on the top rail of the guardrail system at intervals not exceeding 2 m (6.5 ft.).

(4) Once installation of a guardrail system described in section 1 [scope] is complete and before the system is relied on as the fall protection system for the work area, the employer must ensure the following:

(a) the rope rail and the guardrail system is inspected by a qualified person;

(b) the qualified person is satisfied that the installation conforms to the written instructions of the professional engineer required by section 4 of this Schedule;

(c) the qualified person provides the employer with a written record of the inspection that states that the guardrail system is properly installed;

(d) a copy of the record referred to in paragraph (c) is available at the workplace where the guardrail system is installed.

(5) In addition to the inspection required by subsection (4), the employer must ensure that the rope rail and the guardrail system is inspected by a qualified person at the start of each work shift to verify that

(a) the rope rail meets the tension requirements of section 3 (1) and (2) of this Schedule, and

(b) the guardrail system conforms to the written instructions referred to in subsection (4) (b) of this section.

(6) If, on inspection under subsection (5) or at any other time, the qualified person or any other person finds that

(a) the rope rail does not meet the tension requirements referred to in subsection (5), or

(b) the guardrail system does not conform to the written instructions referred to in subsection (4) (b),

no work is to take place in the affected area until the deficiency is corrected or the workers in the area are protected by an alternative fall protection system meeting the requirements of Part 11 [Fall Protection] of this Regulation.

Part 5 — Chemical Agents and Biological Agents

Definitions

5.1   In this Part:

"8-hour TWA limit" means the time weighted average (TWA) concentration of a substance in air which may not be exceeded over a normal 8 hour work period;

"ACGIH" means

(a) the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists publication entitled Threshold Limit Values and Biological Exposure Indices, dated 2002, as amended from time to time, or

(b) the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists publication entitled Documentation of the Threshold Limit Values and Biological Exposure Indices, as amended from time to time;

"adverse health effect" means an acute or chronic injury, acute or chronic disease, or death;

"approved storage area" means a storage area which meets the requirements of article 4.2.7.5 of the BC Fire Code;

"approved storage cabinet" means a flammable liquids storage cabinet which bears a UL or ULC approval label for this purpose or which otherwise meets the requirements of subsection 4.2.10 of the BC Fire Code;

"approved storage room" means a room for container storage which meets the requirements of section 4.2.9 of the BC Fire Code;

"as low as reasonably achievable" or "ALARA" means, in reference to a substance, that measures must be taken to keep a worker's exposure to a level as low as is reasonably achievable;

"bulk shipment" means a shipment of a hazardous product that is contained in any of the following, without intermediate containment or intermediate packaging:

(a) a vessel that has a water capacity equal to or greater than 450 litres;

(b) a freight container, road vehicle, railway vehicle or portable tank;

(c) the hold of a ship;

(d) a pipeline;

"carcinogen" means a substance or a mixture of substances which is identified as a carcinogen in section 5.57 (1), or

(a) causes an increased incidence of benign or malignant neoplasms, or

(b) substantially decreases the latency period between exposure and onset of neoplasms in humans, or

(c) results in the induction of tumors at a site other than the site of administration in one or more experimental mammalian species as a result of any oral, respiratory, or dermal exposure, or any other exposure, or

(d) is metabolized into one or more potential occupational carcinogens by mammals;

"CAS registry number" means the identification number assigned to a chemical by the Chemical Abstracts Service, a division of the American Chemical Society;

"ceiling limit" means the concentration of a substance in air which may not be exceeded at any time during the work period;

"compressed gas" means a substance that meets the criteria for Physical Hazard Class — Gases Under Pressure, Part 7, Subpart 5 of the HPR;

"container" includes a bag, barrel, bottle, box, can, cylinder, drum or similar package or receptacle, but does not include a storage tank;

"continuous flow emergency shower facility" means a facility capable of delivering water with a spray pattern designed to effectively flush affected areas of the skin;

"continuous flow eyewash facility" means a plumbed or portable facility capable of delivering a minimum of 1.5 litres of water per minute (0.33 imp gal per min) with a water pressure not exceeding 175 kPa (25 psi) and with a spray pattern designed to effectively flush both eyes;

"drench hose" means a flexible hose connected to a water supply and capable of delivering a minimum of 11.4 litres of water per minute (2.5 imp gal per min), for use to flush the eyes and/or skin;

"flammable gas" means a substance that meets the criteria for Physical Hazard Class — Flammable Gases, Part 7, Subpart 2 of the HPR;

"fugitive emission" means a gas, liquid, solid, vapour, fume, mist, fog or dust that escapes from process equipment, emission control equipment or from a product where workers may be readily exposed;

"hazard information" means information on the proper and safe use, storage and handling of a hazardous product and includes information related to its health and physical hazards;

"Hazardous Materials Information Review Act" or "HMIRA" means the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (Canada);

"Hazardous Products Act" or "HPA" means the Hazardous Products Act (Canada);

"Hazardous Products Regulations" or "HPR" means the Hazardous Products Regulations (Canada);

"hazardous waste" means a hazardous product that is acquired or generated for recycling or recovery or is intended for disposal;

"hazardous waste profile sheet" means a written description of the hazardous waste which identifies its hazardous characteristics, hazardous ingredients, and prescribes safe work procedures for handling, storing, using and disposing of the waste;

"IARC" means the International Agency for Research on Cancer publication Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans, as amended from time to time;

"label" means a group of written, printed or graphic information elements that relate to a hazardous product, which group is designed to be affixed to, printed on or attached to the hazardous product or the container in which the hazardous product is packaged;

"laboratory sample" means a sample of a hazardous product that is packaged in a container that contains less than 10 kg of the hazardous product and is intended solely to be tested in a laboratory, but does not include a sample that is to be used

(a) by the laboratory for testing other products, mixtures, materials or substances, or

(b) for educational or demonstration purposes;

"manufactured article" means an article that is formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture, the intended use of which, when in that form, is dependent in whole or in part on its shape or design and that, under normal conditions of use, will not release or otherwise cause an individual to be exposed to a hazardous product;

"personal eyewash unit" means an eyewash that supplements an emergency eyewash facility by delivering immediate flushing for less than 15 minutes;

"portable tank" means a closed container that is designed to be movable while containing liquid, which is equipped with skids, mountings or accessories to facilitate handling of the tank by mechanical means and is not permanently attached to a transporting vehicle, as defined in the BC Fire Code;

"product identifier" means, in respect of a hazardous product, the brand name, chemical name, common name, generic name or trade name;

"readily available" means, when used in connection with an SDS, present in an appropriate place and in the form of either

(a) a physical copy that can be handled, or

(b) an electronic copy,

that is accessible to a worker at all times;

"short-term exposure limit" or "STEL" means the time weighted average (TWA) concentration of a substance in air which may not be exceeded over any 15 minute period, limited to no more than 4 such periods in an 8 hour work shift with at least one hour between any 2 successive 15 minute excursion periods;

"significant new data" means new data regarding the hazard presented by a hazardous product that change its classification in a category or subcategory of a hazard class, or result in its classification in another hazard class, or change the ways to protect against the hazard presented by the hazardous product;

"storage tank" means a closed container that has a capacity of more than 250 litres (55 imp gal) and is designed to be installed in a fixed location, as defined in the BC Fire Code;

"supplementary eyewash facility" means a personal eyewash unit or a drench hose;

"supplier label" means a label provided by a supplier that contains the information elements required by the Hazardous Products Act;

"tempered" means maintained at temperatures from 15°C to 30°C (60°F to 85°F);

"temporary" means non-routine work, and does not refer to routine work of short duration;

"workplace label" means a label that discloses

(a) a product identifier that is identical to that found on the SDS of the corresponding hazardous product,

(b) information for the safe handling of the hazardous product that is conveyed in a manner appropriate to the workplace, and

(c) that an SDS, if supplied or produced, is available.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 32; 315/2003, App. A, s. 3; 319/2007, App. A, s. 2; 258/2008, App. C, s. 1; 30/2015, s. 3.]

Designation as hazardous substances

5.1.1   For the purposes of sections 5.2 and 6.33 to 6.40 and Part 30, the following biological agents are designated as hazardous substances:

(a) a liquid or solid material that is contaminated with a prion, virus, bacterium, fungus or other biological agent that has a classification given by the Public Health Agency of Canada as a Risk Group 2, 3 or 4 human pathogen that causes an adverse health effect;

(b) a biological toxin that causes an adverse health effect.

[en. B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 3; am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. N, s. 1.]

General information requirement

5.2   If a worker is or may be exposed to a chemical agent, or biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1, which could cause an adverse health effect, the employer must ensure that

(a) the identity of the chemical agent or biological agent, its possible effects on worker health and safety and any precautions required to protect the health and safety of the worker are clearly indicated by labels, SDSs, or other similar means,

(b) the information required by paragraph (a) is clearly communicated to the worker,

(c) written procedures are prepared and implemented to eliminate or minimize a risk of exposure to a chemical agent or biological agent by any route that could cause an adverse health effect, and to address emergency and cleanup procedures in the event of a spill or release of a chemical agent or biological agent, and

(d) the supervisor and the worker are trained in and follow the measures required in this Part and Part 6 of this Regulation for the safe handling, use, storage and disposal of the chemical agent or biological agent, including emergency and spill cleanup procedures.

[am. B.C. Regs. 319/2007, App. A, s. 4; 30/2015, s. 4.]

Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)

Application

5.3   (1) Subject to subsections (2) to (4), sections 5.4 to 5.18 (the WHMIS Requirements) apply to employers and workers with respect to hazardous products used, stored or handled at a workplace.

(2) The provisions concerning a supplier label and SDS do not apply if the hazardous product is

(a) an explosive as defined in section 2 of the Explosives Act (Canada),

(b) a drug, food or cosmetic device within the meaning of the Food and Drugs Act (Canada),

(c) a pest control product as defined in section 2 (1) of the Pest Control Products Act (Canada),

(d) a nuclear substance as defined in section 2 of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (Canada), that is radioactive, or

(e) a consumer product as defined in section 2 of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act.

(3) The provisions do not apply if the hazardous product is

(a) wood or a product made of wood,

(b) tobacco or a tobacco product as defined in section 2 of the Tobacco Act (Canada),

(c) a manufactured article, or

(d) being transported or handled pursuant to the requirements of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 (Canada) or the Transport of Dangerous Goods Act.

(4) The provisions do not apply to a hazardous waste, except that the employer must ensure the safe storage and handling of a hazardous waste generated at the workplace through the combination of worker training and the information required by this Regulation.

[am. B.C. Regs. 199/2014, App. C, s. 1; 30/2015, s. 5.]

Prohibition

5.4   (1) Subject to subsection (2), an employer must ensure that a hazardous product is not used, stored or handled in a workplace unless all the applicable WHMIS Requirements concerning labels, product identifiers, SDSs and worker education and training are complied with.

(2) An employer may store a hazardous product in a workplace while actively seeking information required by subsection (1).

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 6.]

WHMIS program

5.5   If hazardous products are used in the workplace the employer, in consultation with the joint committee or health and safety representative, as applicable, must establish and maintain an effective WHMIS program, as part of the overall workplace health and safety program, which

(a) addresses applicable WHMIS Requirements including education and training,

(b) is reviewed at least annually, or more frequently if required by a change in work conditions or available hazard information, and

(c) provides for the periodic evaluation of the knowledge of workers using suitable means such as written tests and practical demonstrations.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 7.]

Worker education

5.6   (1) An employer must ensure that general WHMIS education, as it pertains to the workplace, is provided to workers on the

(a) elements of the WHMIS program,

(b) major hazards of the hazardous products in use in the workplace,

(c) rights and responsibilities of employers and workers, and

(d) content required on labels and SDSs, and the significance of this information.

(2) The employer must ensure that a worker who works with a hazardous product or may be exposed to a hazardous product in the course of his or her work activities is informed about all hazard information received from the supplier concerning that hazardous product as well as any further hazard information of which the employer is aware or reasonably ought to be aware concerning the use, storage and handling of that hazardous product.

(3) If a hazardous product is produced in a workplace, the employer must ensure that a worker who works with or in proximity to the hazardous product or may be exposed to the hazardous product in the course of his or her work activities has access to all hazard information of which the employer is aware or reasonably ought to be aware concerning the use, storage and handling of that hazardous product.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 8.]

Worker training

5.7   (1) An employer must ensure that a worker who works with a hazardous product or may be exposed to a hazardous product in the course of his or her work activities is trained in the following:

(a) the content required on a supplier label and workplace label, and the purpose and significance of the information contained on those labels;

(b) the content required on an SDS and the purpose and significance of the information contained on the SDS;

(c) procedures for the safe use, storage, handling and disposal of the hazardous product;

(d) procedures for the safe use, handling and disposal of the hazardous product contained or transferred in

(i) a pipe or a piping system including valves,

(ii) a process or reaction vessel, or

(iii) a tank car, tank truck, ore car, conveyor belt or similar conveyance;

(e) procedures to be followed where fugitive emissions are present if workers may be exposed to those fugitive emissions;

(f) procedures to be followed in case of an emergency involving the hazardous product.

(2) Instruction required by subsection (1) must be specific to the workplace and cover the safe work procedures and emergency response procedures to be used in the workplace.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 9.]

Supplier label

5.8   (1) Subject to any exemptions from labelling requirements in the Hazardous Products Regulations and this Part, an employer must ensure that a hazardous product or the container of a hazardous product received at a workplace is attached or printed with a supplier label.

(2) Subject to any exemptions from labelling requirements in the Hazardous Products Regulations and this Part, an employer must not remove, deface, modify or alter the supplier label, as long as any amount of a hazardous product remains in a workplace in the container in which it was received from the supplier.

(3) Subject to any exemptions from labelling requirements in the Hazardous Products Regulations and this Part, an employer must replace the label with either a supplier label or a workplace label if a supplier label applied to a hazardous product or a container of a hazardous product becomes illegible or is accidentally removed from the hazardous product or the container.

(4) If an employer imports and receives a hazardous product under the Hazardous Products Regulations at the workplace, without a supplier label or with a supplier label that does not comply with the Hazardous Products Regulations, the employer must affix a workplace label that meets the requirements of the Hazardous Products Regulations.

(5) The employer must update the labels or the information on containers as soon as significant new data is provided to the employer by the supplier.

(6) An employer who has received an unpackaged hazardous product or a hazardous product transported as a bulk shipment, to which, under the exemption in the Hazardous Products Regulations, a supplier label has not been affixed or attached, must apply a label having the information required of a supplier label to the container of the hazardous product or to the hazardous product in the workplace.

(7) Subsections (2) and (3) do not apply if a label is removed under normal conditions of use of a hazardous product that is in a container that has a capacity of 3 ml or less and the label interferes with the normal use of the product.

[en. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 10.]

Workplace label for employer-produced products

5.9   (1) If an employer produces a hazardous product at a workplace, the employer must ensure that a workplace label is applied to the hazardous product or the container of the hazardous product.

(2) For purposes of subsection (1), "produces" does not include the escape of a hazardous product from equipment or from another product.

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply if the hazardous product is in a container that is intended to contain the hazardous product for sale or disposition and the container is or is about to be appropriately labelled.

(4) The employer must update the workplace label for a hazardous product produced by the employer as soon as significant new data are available to the employer.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 11.]

Workplace label for decanted products

5.10   (1) If a hazardous product in a workplace is in a container other than the container in which it was received from a supplier, the employer must ensure that the container has a workplace label applied to it.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a portable container that is filled directly from a container that has a supplier label or workplace label applied to it

(a) if the hazardous product

(i) is under the control of and is used exclusively by the worker who filled the portable container,

(ii) is used only during the shift in which the portable container was filled, and

(iii) the content of the container is clearly identified, or

(b) if all of the hazardous product is required for immediate use.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 12.]

Piping systems and vessels

5.11   If a hazardous product in a workplace is contained or transferred in

(a) a pipe, or piping system including valves,

(b) a process or reaction vessel, or

(c) a tank car, tank truck, ore car, conveyor belt or similar conveyance,

the employer must ensure the safe use, storage and handling of the hazardous product through worker training and the use of labels, placards, or colour coding or any other mode of identification.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 13.]

Placard identifiers

5.12   If the hazardous product is not in a container or is in a container in a form intended for export, the employer may fulfill the labelling requirements under sections 5.8 to 5.10 by posting a placard which

(a) discloses the information required for a workplace label, and

(b) is of a size and in locations so that the information is conspicuous and clearly legible to workers.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 14.]

Laboratory label

5.13   (1) If a laboratory sample of a hazardous product is the subject of a labelling exemption under the Hazardous Products Regulations, a label provided by the supplier and affixed to, printed on or attached to the container of the product received at the workplace that discloses the following information in place of the information required under the Hazardous Products Regulations complies with the requirements of section 5.8 of this Part with respect to a supplier label:

(a) the chemical name or generic chemical name of any material or substance in the hazardous product that, individually, is classified, pursuant to the Hazardous Products Act and the Hazardous Products Regulations, in any category or subcategory of a health hazard class and is present above the relevant concentration limit, or is present at a concentration that results in the mixture being classified in a category or subcategory of any health hazard class, if known by the supplier;

(b) the statement "Hazardous Laboratory Sample. For hazard information or in an emergency, call / Échantillon pour laboratoire de produit dangereux. Pour obtenir des renseignements sur les dangers ou en cas d'urgence, composez" followed by an emergency telephone number for the purpose of obtaining information that must be provided on the SDS of the hazardous product.

(2) If a hazardous product is in a container other than the container in which it was received from a supplier, or is produced in the workplace, the employer is exempt from the requirement set out in section 5.10 if the hazardous product

(a) is a laboratory sample,

(b) is intended by the employer solely for use, analysis, testing or evaluation in a laboratory, and

(c) is clearly identified through a combination of

(i) a mode of identification visible to workers at the workplace, and

(ii) worker education and training required by this Part.

(3) The employer must ensure that the mode of identification and worker education and training referred to in subsection (2) (c) enable the worker to readily identify and obtain either the information required on an SDS, if one has been produced, or a label or document disclosing the information referred to in subsection (1) (a) and (b) with respect to the hazardous product or the laboratory sample.

[en. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 15.]

Supplier SDS

5.14   (1) Subject to subsection (6), an employer who acquires a hazardous product for use, handling or storage at a workplace must obtain a supplier SDS in respect of that hazardous product that complies with the requirements of the Hazardous Products Regulations.

(2) When a supplier SDS obtained under subsection (1) for a hazardous product is 3 years old, the employer must obtain from the supplier an up-to-date supplier SDS in respect of any of that hazardous product in the workplace at that time.

(3) Subsection (2) does not apply if

(a) the employer has obtained written confirmation from the supplier that

(i) the SDS has not changed, or

(ii) the up-to-date supplier SDS does not apply to the hazardous product, or

(b) it is not practicable for the employer to obtain the up-to-date SDS or written confirmation under paragraph (a).

(4) If the employer is unable to obtain an SDS as required by subsection (2), the employer must add to the existing supplier SDS any significant new data or new hazard information applicable to that hazardous product that the employer is aware of, or ought reasonably to be aware of, on the basis of the ingredients disclosed in that document.

(5) The employer may provide at a workplace an SDS in a format different from the format provided by the supplier or containing additional hazard information if the SDS provided by the employer

(a) subject to section 5.18, contains no less content than the supplier SDS, and

(b) the supplier SDS is available at the workplace and the employer-provided SDS indicates that fact.

(6) If a supplier is exempted by the Hazardous Products Regulations from the requirement to provide an SDS for a hazardous product, the employer is exempt from the requirement to obtain and provide an SDS for that hazardous product.

[en. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 16.]

Employer SDS

5.15   (1) If an employer produces a hazardous product in the workplace, the employer must prepare an SDS in respect of that product that discloses, subject to section 5.18, the information required under the Hazardous Products Regulations.

(2) For the purpose of subsection (1), "produces" does not include the escape of a hazardous product from equipment or from another product nor does it include intermediate products undergoing reaction within a reaction or process vessel.

(3) The employer must update the SDS referred to in subsection (1) as soon as practicable after significant new data or new hazard information becomes available to the employer.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 17.]

Availability of an SDS

5.16   (1) An employer must ensure that a copy of an SDS required by sections 5.14 or 5.15 is made readily available

(a) at the workplace to workers who may be exposed to the hazardous product, and

(b) to the joint committee or to the worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

(2) If an employer is required by subsection (1) to make an SDS readily available, the joint committee or worker health and safety representative, as applicable, must be consulted on the means on how best to achieve SDS accessibility in the workplace.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 33; 30/2015, s. 18.]

Availability of toxicological data

5.16.1   Subject to section 5.18, if an employer manufactures a hazardous product in a workplace, the employer must disclose as quickly as practicable the source of any toxicological data used in preparing the SDS required by section 5.15 (1), at the request of

(a) any concerned worker at the workplace, the joint committee or the worker health and safety representative,

(b) the representative of the workers at the workplace, in the absence of a joint committee or worker health and safety representative, or

(c) the Board.

[en. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 19.]

Deletions from an SDS

5.17   If an employer claims an exemption under section 5.18, the employer may delete the information that is the subject of the claim from the SDS required by sections 5.14 and 5.15 for the time period in section 5.18 (8), but may not delete hazard information.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 20.]

Confidential business information and claims for exemption under the HMIRA

5.18   (1) An employer who is required, under this Regulation, to disclose any of the following information on a label or SDS may, if the employer considers it to be confidential business information, claim an exemption from the requirement to disclose the information:

(a) in the case of a material or substance that is a hazardous product,

(i) the chemical name of the material or substance,

(ii) the CAS registry number, or any other unique identifier, of the material or substance, and

(iii) the chemical name of any impurity, stabilizing solvent or stabilizing additive that is present in the material or substance, that is classified in a category or subcategory of a health hazard class under the Hazardous Products Act and that contributes to the classification of the material or substance in the health hazard class under that Act;

(b) in the case of an ingredient that is in a mixture that is a hazardous product,

(i) the chemical name of the ingredient,

(ii) the CAS registry number, or any other unique identifier, of the ingredient, and

(iii) the concentration or concentration range of the ingredient;

(c) in the case of a material, substance or mixture that is a hazardous product, the name of any toxicological study that identifies the material or substance or any ingredient in the mixture;

(d) the product identifier of a hazardous product, being its chemical name, common name, generic name, trade name or brand name;

(e) information about a hazardous product, other than the product identifier, that constitutes a means of identification;

(f) information that could be used to identify a supplier of a hazardous product.

(2) A claim under subsection (1) must be made under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act and must be filed in accordance with the procedures established under that Act and the regulations made under it.

(3) An employer is deemed to comply with section 5.15 of this Regulation if the employer produces a hazardous product in the workplace and files a claim for exemption under section 11 (2) (a) or (b) (i) or (ii) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, and the employer prepares an SDS in respect of that hazardous product that discloses the following in place of the information elements listed in section 3 (1) (a), (b), (c) and (d) or 3 (2) (a), (b) and (c) of Schedule 1 of the Hazardous Products Regulations:

(a) in the case of a hazardous product that is a material or substance, the generic chemical name of the material or substance;

(b) in the case of a hazardous product that is a mixture, the generic chemical name of each material or substance in the mixture that, individually, is classified in any category or subcategory of a health hazard class and is present above the applicable concentration limit or is present at a concentration that results in the mixture being classified in a category or subcategory of any health hazard class.

(4) An employer is deemed to comply with section 5.15 of this Regulation if the employer produces a hazardous product in the workplace and files a claim for exemption under section 11 (2) (b) (iii) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, and the employer prepares an SDS in respect of that hazardous product that does not disclose the information element listed in section 3 (2) (d) of Schedule 1 of the Hazardous Products Regulations.

(5) An employer is deemed to comply with section 5.15 of this Regulation if the employer produces a hazardous product in the workplace and files a claim for exemption under section 11 (2) (d) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, and the employer prepares an SDS in respect of that hazardous product that discloses, in place of the product identifier, a code name or code number for the product.

(6) An employer who files a claim for exemption from a requirement to disclose information in respect of a hazardous product on an SDS or on a label must disclose on the SDS and, where applicable, on the label of the hazardous product or the container of the hazardous product,

(a) the date that the claim for exemption was filed, and

(b) the registry number assigned to the claim under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act.

(7) The requirements referred to in subsection (6) apply until

(a) in the case of an order that was issued by a screening officer under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the end of the period that begins on the final disposition of the proceedings under that Act in relation to the claim for exemption and does not exceed the period specified in the order, or

(b) in any other case, the end of the period not exceeding 30 days after the final disposition of the proceedings in relation to the claim for exemption.

(8) Information that an employer considers to be confidential business information is exempt from disclosure from the time a claim is filed under subsection (2) until the final disposition of the proceedings under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act in relation to the claim and for a period of 3 years after that if the claim is found to be valid.

(9) An employer who receives notice of a decision made under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act that the employer's claim or a portion of the employer's claim for exemption from a requirement to provide information in respect of a hazardous product on an SDS or a label is valid must, during the period beginning no later than the end of the applicable period specified in subsection (7) of this section and on compliance with any order issued under section 16 (1) or 17 (1) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, if applicable, and ending on the last day of the exemption period, in respect of the sale or importation of the hazardous product, disclose on the SDS and, if applicable, on the label of the hazardous product or container in which the hazardous product is packaged, the following information:

(a) a statement that an exemption has been granted;

(b) the date of the decision granting the exemption;

(c) the registry number assigned to the claim under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act.

(10) An employer who makes a claim under subsection (1) must abide by the decisions and orders issued under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act.

(11) An appeal from a decision or order referred to in subsection (10) may be made under and in accordance with the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act and any regulations made under that Act.

[en. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 21.]

Repealed

5.19   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 22.]

Containers and Storage

Condition of containers

5.20   The container of a hazardous substance must be designed, constructed and maintained in good condition to securely contain the substance.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 37.]

Material integrity

5.21   Any material used to contain, transfer or convey a hazardous substance must be reasonably resistant to the substance and to any other substance to which it may be exposed.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 37.]

Covers

5.22   If an open container of a hazardous substance could pose a hazard, the container must be kept sealed or covered when not in use.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 37.]

Permitted quantities

5.23   (1) The amount of a hazardous substance in a work area must not exceed the quantity reasonably needed for work in progress, normally in one work shift.

(2) Bulk or reserve quantities must be stored in a designated area separate from the work area.

Incompatible substances

5.24   Substances which are incompatible must not be stored in a manner that would allow them to mix in the event of container leakage, breakage or other such circumstance.

Storage practices

5.25   A hazardous substance must be stored in a designated area, in a manner which ensures that it will not readily fall, become dislodged, suffer damage, or be exposed to conditions of extreme temperature.

Storage area

5.26   The designated storage area for a hazardous substance must be

(a) designed and constructed to provide for the safe containment of the contents,

(b) clearly identified by signs, placards or similar means,

(c) designed and maintained to allow the safe movement of workers, equipment and material,

(d) provided with adequate ventilation and lighting, and

(e) in a location not normally occupied by workers, and not in a location such as a lunchroom, eating area, change room, clothing storage locker or passenger compartment of a vehicle.

Flammable and Combustible Substances

Ignition sources

5.27   (0.1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. D, s. 2 (a).]

(1) When a flammable gas or a flammable liquid is handled, used or stored, all sources of ignition must be eliminated or adequately controlled.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1) sources of ignition include open flame, spark-producing mechanical equipment, welding and cutting processes, smoking, static discharge and any electrical equipment or installation that is not permitted under the B.C. Electrical Code for use in hazardous locations.

(3) If the work involves more than one employer, the prime contractor or, if there is no prime contractor, the owner must ensure that sources of ignition resulting from the work of one employer are eliminated or adequately controlled in any work area where a flammable gas or a flammable liquid is handled, used or stored by any other employer.

[am. B.C. Regs. 199/2014, App. C, s. 2; 9/2017, App. D, s. 2; 14/2019, App. G, s. 1.]

Grounding or bonding

5.28   Metallic or conductive containers used to transfer flammable liquids must be electrically bonded to each other or electrically grounded while their contents are being transferred from one container to the other.

Electrostatic charge

5.29   If glass, plastic or other non-conductive container with a capacity of 23 litres (5 imp gal) or more is used to transfer a flammable liquid, the accumulation of electrostatic charge near the surface of the liquid must be eliminated or controlled by

(a) limiting the flow velocity of the liquid to less than 1 m/s (200 fpm),

(b) using a grounded lance or nozzle extending to the bottom of the container,

(c) limiting free fall,

(d) using anti-static additives, or

(e) other effective means.

Dispensing

5.30   If a flammable liquid is dispensed or transferred inside a flammable liquids storage room,

(a) the storage room must be mechanically ventilated at a rate of at least 18 m3/hr per square metre of floor area (1 cfm/sq ft), but not less than 250 m3/hr (150 cfm),

(b) exhaust air must be discharged to the outdoors, and makeup air provided,

(c) any makeup air duct passing through a fire separation must be equipped with an approved fire damper, and

(d) doors must be self-closing.

Flammable gas or vapour

5.31   If it is not practicable to maintain the airborne concentration of a flammable gas or vapour below the applicable exposure limit, for example, in a temporary situation or an emergency,

(a) only the minimum number of workers necessary for the work may be exposed,

(b) every worker exposed must be adequately trained and equipped to safely perform the required duties,

(c) the concentration of the flammable gas or vapour must not exceed 20% of the lower explosive limit (LEL), and

(d) in a life-threatening emergency only, exposure of emergency response workers is permitted above 20% of the LEL, provided that only those qualified and properly trained and equipped workers necessary to correct the unsafe condition are exposed to the hazard and every possible effort is made to control the hazard while this is being done.

Manual cleaning

5.32   A flammable liquid must not be used as a manual cleaning solvent unless

(a) a thorough review of alternative solvents by the employer indicates that a suitable non-flammable substitute is not available,

(b) appropriate written safe work procedures are implemented to effectively control flammability and health hazards,

(c) the quantity of liquid used is minimized,

(d) the worker is instructed and trained in the safe work procedures, and

(e) the work procedures have been submitted to the Board.

Permitted quantities

5.33   Except for the quantity reasonably needed for immediate use, or that is present for display or sale in public areas of a mercantile facility, the quantity of combustible and flammable liquids stored outside an approved storage cabinet, storage room or storage area in any fire compartment (2 hour fire separation) of a building must not exceed

(a) in closed containers, 600 litres (132 imp gal) of liquids having a flash point below 93.3°C (200°F) of which not more than 100 litres (22 imp gal) may be liquids having a flash point below 22.8°C (73°F) and a boiling point below 37.8°C (100°F), and

(b) in storage tanks or portable tanks, 5 000 litres (1 100 imp gal) of liquids having a flash point below 93.3°C (200°F) and a boiling point at or above 37.8°C (100°F).

Combustible materials

5.34   Except for packaging used to contain flammable or combustible liquids, combustible shelves, racks and other materials are not permitted inside a flammable or combustible liquids storage room or storage cabinet unless required as part of a fire separation.

Cabinet vent

5.35   If a flammable liquids storage cabinet is vented, the vent must be a steel pipe at least 5 cm (2 in) in diameter which is connected directly to the outdoors.

Substances Under Pressure

Containers

5.36   (1) A tank, cylinder, bottle or other vessel containing a substance under pressure, together with any associated pressure or flow regulator and piping or conveyance system, must be

(a) protected from sparks, flames, excessive heat, physical damage, electrical contact or corrosion, and

(b) equipped with suitable pressure relief mechanisms installed so that no worker will be endangered in the event of discharge.

(c) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 3 (c).]

(2) Hand-held aerosol spray cans are exempt from the requirements of subsection (1) (b).

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 3.]

Pressure testing

5.37   A compressed gas container which requires pressure testing must bear a valid and current indication that it has been pressure tested.

Handling and securing cylinders

5.38   (1) A compressed gas cylinder must not be hoisted by a sling or magnet, dropped, subjected to impact, handled by the regulator or used as a roller or work support.

(2) A compressed gas cylinder must be secured to prevent falling or rolling during storage, transportation and use, and where practicable, must be kept in the upright position.

Cylinder markings

5.39   A compressed gas cylinder must be marked to indicate its rated pressure and the type of gas it contains.

Cylinder valves

5.40   (1) The valve on a compressed gas cylinder must be kept closed when the cylinder is empty or not in use.

(2) A worker must not stand directly in front of a regulator attached to a compressed gas cylinder when the cylinder valve is being opened.

(3) Any valve, regulator or fitting connected to a compressed gas cylinder must be a standard fitting, designed and manufactured for the type of cylinder and compressed gas for which it will be used, and must include provisions for flashback arresters where necessary.

(4) Unless a compressed gas cylinder is equipped with an integral valve guard, the valve cover must be in position when the cylinder is not connected for use.

Fittings

5.41   Only standard fittings designed for the specific compressed gas service may be used with a compressed gas system.

Repealed

5.42   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 4.]

Empty cylinders

5.43   An empty compressed gas cylinder must be identified as being empty and must be stored separately from other compressed gas cylinders.

Acetylene cylinders

5.44   (1) A compressed gas cylinder containing acetylene must be used only in the upright position.

(2) If the cylinder has been stored or transported in a horizontal position, it must be placed in the upright position for at least 1 hour before it is used.

(3) A suitable device for closing the valve on an acetylene cylinder must be immediately available when the cylinder is connected for use.

Restriction on use of copper

5.45   A fitting or tube made of copper or any alloy containing more than 67% copper must not be used in a system carrying acetylene gas, except for copper torch tips and lengths of copper tubing 30 cm (1 ft) or less in length which are open to the atmosphere.

Restriction on use of oxygen

5.46   (1) Oxygen gas must not be used in any circumstance where it can contact a substance that oxidizes readily, such as a petroleum product, natural fibre or metal powder.

(2) Oxygen gas must not be used to

(a) operate a pneumatic tool,

(b) start an internal combustion engine,

(c) clean equipment or clothing,

(d) create pressure in a container, or

(e) ventilate a workplace.

Cleanliness

5.47   A worker must not permit oil or grease to contact an oxygen cylinder valve, regulator, or fitting.

Controlling Exposure

Exposure limits

5.48   Except as otherwise determined by the Board, the employer must ensure that no worker is exposed to a substance that exceeds the ceiling limit, short-term exposure limit, or 8-hour TWA limit prescribed by ACGIH.

[en. B.C. Reg. 315/2003, App. A, s. 4.]

Excursion limits

5.49   If a substance referred to under section 5.48 is provided only with an 8-hour TWA limit, the employer must, in addition to the requirement of section 5.48, ensure that a worker's exposure to the substance does not exceed

(a) three times the 8-hour TWA limit for more than a total of 30 minutes during the work period, and

(b) five times the 8-hour TWA limit at any time.

[en. B.C. Reg. 315/2003, App. A, s. 5; am. B.C. Reg. 243/2006, s. 2.]

Extended work periods

5.50   (1) If the work period is more than 8 hours in a 24 hour day, the 8-hour TWA limit must be reduced by multiplying the TWA limit by the following factors:

FactorLength of work period (in hours)
0.7more than 8, but not more than 10
0.5more than 10, but not more than 12
0.25more than 12, but not more than 16
0.1more than 16

(2) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. L, s. 1.]

[am. B.C. Regs. 315/2003, App. A, s. 6; 188/2011, App. L, s. 1.]

Additive effects

5.51   If there is exposure to a mixture of 2 or more substances with established exposure limits which exhibit similar toxicological effects, the effects of such exposure must be considered additive unless it is known otherwise, and the additive exposure must not exceed 100% when calculated as follows:

AE = %EL1 + %EL2 + ...%ELn

where

(a) AE is the calculated additive exposure to the mixture,

(b) % EL1 is the measured exposure to component 1 of the mixture expressed as a percentage of its exposure limit,

(c) %EL2 is the measured exposure to component 2 of the mixture expressed as a percentage of its exposure limit, and

(d) %ELn is the measured exposure to any additional components of the mixture expressed as a percentage of their respective exposure limits.

[en. B.C. Reg. 315/2003, App. A, s. 7.]

Skin designation

5.52   If skin absorption may contribute to the overall exposure, effective measures must be taken to limit exposure by this route.

Workplace monitoring

5.53   (1) If a worker is or may be exposed to a hazardous substance, the employer must ensure that

(a) a walkthrough survey is conducted to assess the potential for overexposure taking into account all routes of exposure, including inhalation, ingestion, and skin contact, and

(b) reassessment is conducted when there is a change in work conditions which may increase the exposure, such as a change in production rate, process or equipment.

(2) If the walkthrough survey required by subsection (1) reveals that a worker may be at risk of overexposure to an airborne contaminant, the employer must ensure that air sampling is conducted to assess the potential for overexposure.

(3) Additional workplace monitoring to reliably determine worker exposure is required if

(a) the assessment under subsection (2) reveals that a worker may be exposed to an air contaminant in excess of 50% of its exposure limit, or

(b) measurement is not possible at 50% of the applicable exposure limit.

(4) Workplace exposure monitoring and assessment must be conducted using occupational hygiene methods acceptable to the Board.

(5) The results of workplace exposure monitoring and assessment, or a summary of the results, must be provided to workers at their request without undue delay.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 38.]

Exposure control plan

5.54   (1) An exposure control plan must be implemented when

(a) exposure monitoring under section 5.53 (3) indicates that a worker is or may be exposed to an air contaminant in excess of 50% of its exposure limit,

(b) measurement is not possible at 50% of the applicable exposure limit, or

(c) otherwise required by this Regulation.

(2) The exposure control plan must incorporate the following elements:

(a) a statement of purpose and responsibilities;

(b) risk identification, assessment and control;

(c) education and training;

(d) written work procedures, when required;

(e) hygiene facilities and decontamination procedures, when required;

(f) health monitoring, when required;

(g) documentation, when required.

(3) The plan must be reviewed at least annually and updated as necessary by the employer, in consultation with the joint committee or the worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 39.]

Type of controls

5.55   (1) If there is a risk to a worker from exposure to a hazardous substance by any route of exposure, the employer must eliminate the exposure, or otherwise control it below harmful levels and below the applicable exposure limit established under section 5.48 by

(a) substitution,

(b) engineering control,

(c) administrative control, or

(d) personal protective equipment.

(2) When selecting a suitable substitute, the employer must ensure that the hazards of the substitute are known, and that the risk to workers is reduced by its use.

(3) The use of personal protective equipment as the primary means to control exposure is permitted only when

(a) substitution, or engineering or administrative controls are not practicable, or

(b) additional protection is required because engineering or administrative controls are insufficient to reduce exposure below the applicable exposure limits, or

(c) the exposure results from temporary or emergency conditions only.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 38; 315/2003, App. A, s. 8.]

Oxygen deficiency

5.56   The airborne concentration of any gas or vapour must be controlled so that a worker is not exposed to an oxygen deficient atmosphere, and there is no other hazard, such as fire or explosion.

Designated substances

5.57   (1) If a substance identified as any of the following is present in the workplace, the employer must replace it, if practicable, with a material which reduces the risk to workers:

(a) ACGIH A1 or A2, or IARC 1, 2A or 2B carcinogen;

(b) ACGIH reproductive toxin;

(c) ACGIH sensitizer;

(d) ACGIH L endnote.

(2) If it is not practicable to substitute a material which reduces the risk to workers, in accordance with subsection (1), the employer must implement an exposure control plan to maintain workers' exposure as low as reasonably achievable below the exposure limit established under section 5.48.

(3) The exposure control plan must meet the requirements of section 5.54.

[en. B.C. Reg. 315/2003, App. A, s. 9; am. B.C. Reg. 258/2008, App. C, s. 2.]

Protective policy

5.58   (1) At any worksite where a worker is exposed to a substance which is identified in section 5.57 (1) as an ACGIH reproductive toxin or an ACGIH sensitizer, the employer must develop policy and procedures appropriate to the risk, which may include protective reassignment.

(2) The policy and procedures required by subsection (1) must

(a) inform workers about the reproductive toxin and identify ways to minimize exposure to the toxin for a worker who has advised the employer of pregnancy or intent to conceive a child, and

(b) identify ways to eliminate or minimize exposure to a sensitizer for a worker who is or may be sensitized to that substance.

[am. B.C. Regs. 315/2003, App. A, s. 10; 258/2008, App. C, s. 3.]

Investigating symptoms

5.59   (1) If a worker exhibits signs or reports symptoms of overexposure to a hazardous substance present in the workplace, the employer must investigate and assess the potential for exposure.

(2) If the assessment demonstrates that the signs or symptoms can be caused by exposure to a hazardous substance that is present in the workplace, further investigation must be conducted, in consultation with the joint committee or the worker health and safety representative, as applicable, to address and resolve the worker's concern.

(3) Records of the investigation required under subsection (2) must be made available to workers, and maintained by the employer for a minimum of 10 years.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 40.]

Ventilation

Application

5.60   Sections 5.61 to 5.71 apply to ventilation used for the control of air contaminants in the workplace, except for heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings, which are subject to requirements on indoor air quality in Part 4 (General Conditions).

Engineering principles

5.61   A ventilation system for controlling airborne contaminants in the workplace must be designed, installed and maintained using established engineering principles.

Submitting plans

5.62   The employer or the employer's agent must submit to the Board drawings and specifications for an existing or proposed ventilation system if requested by the Board.

Building modifications

5.63   The owner of a building must permit an employer to install an exhaust ventilation and makeup air system to meet the requirements of this Part for controlling harmful air contaminants in the workplace, provided that all such work is subject to the approval of the owner acting reasonably.

Controlling air contaminants

5.64   (1) If ventilation is used as an engineering control, an air contaminant must be controlled at the source by an effective local exhaust ventilation system.

(2) If local exhaust ventilation is not practicable, general (dilution) ventilation, or a combination of general and local exhaust ventilation must be used.

Worker location

5.65   A local exhaust ventilation system must be designed so that under normal work procedures a worker's breathing zone is not located between the source of contamination and the exhaust uptake.

Ventilation openings

5.66   A ventilation system must not be obstructed by material or equipment placed in front of the ventilation openings.

Effectiveness

5.67   (1) An exhaust ventilation system used to control air contaminants in the workplace must remain in operation until the work process is completed and the air contaminants generated have been removed so as not to be a hazard to workers.

(2) An exhaust ventilation system used to control air contaminants in the workplace must be regularly inspected and monitored to ensure that it remains effective.

Failure warning

5.68   If failure of an exhaust ventilation system would result in a hazard that is not readily apparent to affected workers, the system must be equipped with a device or other means to warn those workers in the event of system failure.

Makeup air

5.69   (1) An adequate supply of makeup air must be provided as necessary to

(a) maintain the effectiveness of an exhaust ventilation system, or

(b) prevent an air contaminant being drawn into the work space from another work area.

(2) A makeup air supply must not expose a worker to uncomfortable temperatures or drafts.

Discharged air

5.70   (1) The use of a ventilation system designed to recirculate contaminants into the work area is restricted by the provisions of Table 5-1.

(2) A ventilation system that discharges air from the work area must be designed to minimize the likelihood of exposing any worker at a workplace, including an adjacent workplace,

(a) to an air contaminant in a concentration which exceeds either 10% of its applicable exposure limit in this Part or an acceptable ambient air quality standard established by an authority having jurisdiction over environmental air standards, whichever is greater, and

(b) if practicable, to an objectionable odour.

Table 5-1: Recirculation of discharged air

Recirculation permitted without written approvalA nuisance particulate with an 8-hour TWA limit of at least 10 mg/m3,
provided that its concentration in the discharged air is less than
10% of the TWA limit.
Asbestos fibre or other particulate, except a biological contaminant,
provided that it is exhausted from a portable vacuum cleaner
or bench-top containment unit, fitted with an effective HEPA filter.
A welding fume, (including its components identified under
section 5.57 (1)) exhausted from a portable welding fume extractor fitted
with an air cleaner, provided that its concentration in the
discharged air is less than 10% of the applicable exposure limit.
A biological contaminant discharged from a biological safety
cabinet that is installed and operated in accordance with the
requirements in Part 30 (Laboratories).
Non-allergenic softwood dust, provided that its concentration in the
discharged air is less than 10% of the 8-hour TWA limit.
Recirculation only with written approval by the BoardAllergenic wood dust.
Non-allergenic hardwood dust.
Any contaminant not otherwise listed in this Table.
No recirculation permittedA substance identified under section 5.57 (1), unless otherwise
identified in this Table.

[am. B.C. Reg. 315/2003, App. A, s. 11.]

Flammable air contaminants

5.71   (1) If an operation or work process produces a combustible or flammable air contaminant in concentrations that may present a risk of fire or explosion, the employer must provide a separate exhaust ventilation system for the operation or work process.

(2) If electrical equipment used in an exhaust ventilation system required by subsection (1) contacts the air stream, the employer must ensure that the electrical equipment is permitted under the B.C. Electrical Code

(a) for use in that location, and

(b) for the specific air contaminants that are or may be present.

(3) A dust collector having an internal volume greater than 0.6 m3 (20 ft3) and being used to control combustible dusts must be located and constructed so that no worker will be endangered in the event of an explosion inside the collector.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 6; 9/2017, App. D, s. 3.]

Internal Combustion Engines

Venting outdoors

5.72   Whenever possible, exhaust from any internal combustion engine operated indoors must be vented to the outdoors.

Indoor operation

5.73   If mobile equipment powered by an internal combustion engine is operated indoors or in an enclosed work area

(a) the engine must be adequately serviced and maintained to minimize the concentration of air contaminants in the exhaust, and

(b) the work area must be assessed to determine the potential for exposure of workers to harmful levels of exhaust components.

Emission controls

5.74   If a worker is or may be exposed to an exhaust gas component in concentrations exceeding the applicable exposure limits, exhaust gas scrubbers, catalytic converters, or other engineering controls must be installed.

Mobile equipment emission controls

5.75   Mobile equipment manufactured after January 1, 1999 that is regularly operated indoors must be

(a) equipped with an emission control system that includes a feedback control for air/fuel ratio, and a three-way catalytic converter if the mobile equipment is powered by gasoline, propane or natural gas, or other measures acceptable to the Board, or

(b) equipped with a scrubber or other emission control system that reduces particulate emissions by at least 70% when tested according to the procedures of the Mine Safety and Health Administration, US Department of Labour, or must meet another standard acceptable to the Board, if the mobile equipment is powered by diesel fuel.

[am. B.C. Reg. 381/2004, s. 1.]

Hazardous Wastes and Emissions

Label

5.76   If an employer produces, stores, handles or disposes of a hazardous waste at a workplace, the employer must, except as provided in section 5.79, ensure that a workplace label is applied to each container of hazardous waste, or the information mandated by the Hazardous Products Regulations is provided, if applicable.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 23.]

Placard

5.77   (1) An employer may identify a hazardous waste which is not in a container by posting a placard in a workplace which

(a) discloses the information required for a workplace label, and

(b) is of a size and in locations so that the information is conspicuous and clearly legible to workers.

(2) If a fugitive emission that contains a hazardous product is produced or disposed of, the employer must post a placard which complies with subsection (1), or ensure equivalent information is provided to workers through identification and training.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 24.]

SDS

5.78   If a hazardous waste or a fugitive emission that contains a hazardous product is produced, stored, handled or disposed of in the workplace, the employer must prepare an SDS for the hazardous waste or fugitive emission unless a hazardous waste profile sheet or its equivalent which addresses composition, hazards and safe measures for the waste or fugitive emission is readily available.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 25.]

Sale or disposal

5.79   An employer must not sell or dispose of a hazardous waste intended for use, handling, storage or disposal in a workplace unless

(a) the hazardous waste or container in which the waste is packaged has a label or placard which complies with sections 5.76 and 5.77, and

(b) at the time of sale or disposal the employer transmits to the receiver an SDS for the hazardous products in the hazardous waste or a hazardous waste profile sheet which addresses the composition, hazards and safe measures for the hazardous waste.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 26.]

Sharp-edged waste

5.80   Broken glass, metal or similar rigid, sharp-edged waste must be disposed of in separate, puncture proof waste containers and the contents of the containers must be clearly identified.

Combustible dust

5.81   If combustible dust collects in a building or structure or on machinery or equipment, it must be safely removed before accumulation of the dust could cause a fire or explosion.

Personal Hygiene

Employer's responsibility

5.82   (1) If a work process may result in harm to a worker from contamination of the worker's skin or clothing by a hazardous substance, the employer must

(a) supply appropriate protective clothing,

(b) launder or dispose of the protective clothing on a regular basis, according to the hazard,

(c) provide adequate wash facilities, and

(d) allow time for washing before each work break.

(2) If work processes involving substances such as lead, mercury, asbestos, silica or pesticides are high hazard, the employer must also ensure that workers are provided with

(a) clothing lockers in separate rooms for street clothing and work clothing,

(b) heated shower facilities between the rooms, and

(c) time for showering and clothing change before the end of the work shift.

(3) In a remote location where provision of change rooms and shower facilities is not practicable, separate clothing storage and adequate washing facilities must be provided.

Worker's responsibility

5.83   A worker engaged in a work process described in section 5.82 must

(a) wear the supplied protective clothing,

(b) wash effectively before each work break and the end of the work shift, and

(c) shower at the end of the work shift, if required by the hazard.

Prohibition

5.84   Eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics or storing food is prohibited in any work area where a work process described in section 5.82 takes place.

Emergency Washing Facilities

Where required

5.85   The employer must ensure that appropriate emergency washing facilities are provided within a work area where a worker's eyes or skin may be exposed to harmful or corrosive materials or other materials which may burn or irritate.

Water supply

5.86   (1) For a plumbed emergency eyewash facility, the employer must ensure that only a potable water supply is used.

(2) For a portable (non-plumbed) eyewash unit, the employer must ensure that only potable water or an isotonic saline flushing solution is used.

Access

5.87   The employer must ensure that access to emergency eyewash and shower facilities is not blocked by material or equipment.

Risk assessment

5.88   The employer must ensure that the selection of emergency washing facilities is based upon an assessment of the risks present in the workplace, according to Table 5-2.

Equipment required

5.89   (1) The employer must ensure, except where it is not practicable to provide a permanent water supply, such as at a remote or transient worksite, that emergency eyewash and shower facilities are provided and located as specified in Table 5-3.

(2) Requirements for tempered water in Table 5-3 do not apply if the advice of a medical professional indicates that tempered washing would increase the risk of injury in a particular application.

Transient worksites

5.90   (1) The employer must ensure that portable self-contained units are provided, where it is not practicable to provide a permanent water supply at transient worksites such as construction sites.

(2) The employer must ensure that portable self-contained units at these transient worksites are capable of delivering a minimum flush duration of 15 minutes (or more if required by the nature of the material) if there is a high or a moderate risk of injury to the eyes or skin.

Remote worksites

5.91   The employer must ensure that effective means to flush the eyes or skin, based upon an assessment of the risk, is reasonably available at a remote worksite if it is not practicable to provide a portable self-contained unit.

Signs

5.92   The employer must ensure that emergency eyewash and shower facilities are clearly identified by signs which indicate their location and provide clear directions for their use.

Testing

5.93   (1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 5 (b).]

(2) The employer must ensure that a plumbed emergency eyewash or shower facility is full flow tested at least once per month, for a sufficient length of time to completely flush the branch of the water line supplying the eyewash.

(3) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 5 (b).]

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 5.]

Training

5.94   The employer must ensure that workers who are required to use emergency eyewash and shower facilities are adequately trained in their location and proper use.

Protection from freezing

5.95   The employer must ensure that an emergency eyewash or shower facility and the piping from the supply are protected against freezing.

Table 5-2: Risk assessment

Risk LevelDescription of the workplaceExamples
High riskWorkplaces at which corrosive chemicals or other materials are used in a manner, concentration and quantity which present a risk of irreversible tissue damage to the eyes or skin, or of serious illness resulting from rapid absorption of a toxic substance through the eyes or skin, or where the work activity presents a risk of ignition of the clothing.Maintenance of ammonia refrigeration equipment or chlorine bleaching or disinfection equipment, handling corrosive materials such as corrosive cleaning products or chemical reagents where there is a high risk of skin or eye contact, filling chemical storage batteries. The following Health Hazard Classes and Categories in the HPR are included:
  (a) skin corrosion (1A), (1B), (1C);
  (b) serious eye damage (1).
Moderate riskWorkplaces at which chemicals or other materials are used in a manner, concentration and quantity which present a risk of irritation or other reversible harm to the eyes or skin, or of illness resulting from absorption of a toxic substance through the eyes or skin.Spraying automotive paints and finishes, operating solvent degreasing equipment, handling irritant materials such as cleaning products or chemical reagents where there is a moderate risk of skin or eye contact, handling dry-cleaning solvents and spotting agents. The following Health Hazard Classes and Categories in the HPR are included:
  (a) eye irritation (2A), (2B);
  (b) skin irritation (2).
Low riskWorkplaces at which chemicals or other materials are used in a manner and quantity which present a risk of mild eye or skin irritation.Using detergents, silicone-based mold-release agents, some hair-dressing solutions, rosin-cored solders, welding and grinding, working in dusty areas.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 27.]

Table 5-3: Provision and location of emergency washing equipment

 High riskModerate riskLow risk
Eye

Equipment


Tempered, continuous flow eyewash facility with a minimum duration of 15 minutes (or more if required by the nature of the material).


Tempered, continuous flow eyewash facility with a minimum duration of 15 minutes.


Effective means to flush the eyes.
LocationWithin 5 seconds walking distance of the hazard area, but no further than 6 m (20 ft). For high risk corrosive gases such as ammonia or chlorine, the facilities must not be located in the gas storage or use area, but rather, adjacent to it.Within 10 seconds walking distance of the hazard area, but no further than 30 m (100 ft).
May be located further than 30 m, provided that
  (a) a supplementary eyewash facility such as a personal eyewash unit or a non-tempered drench hose is located within 10 seconds walking distance of the hazard area but no further than 30 m, and
  (b) first aid services are maintained to start treatment of an affected worker within 5 minutes of the contact.
Within 10 seconds walking distance of the hazard area but no further than 30 m (100 ft).
Skin

Equipment


Tempered, continuous flow emergency shower facility with a minimum duration of 15 minutes (or more if required by the nature of the material).


Tempered, continuous flow emergency shower facility with a minimum duration of 15 minutes.


Emergency flushing equipment, such as a non-tempered drench hose.
LocationSame location criteria as for high risk eyewash facility except that the shower may be located further than 6 m if
  (a) a supplementary emergency washing facility such as a non-tempered drench hose is located within 5 seconds walking distance of the hazard area but no further than 6 m, and
  (b) a tempered shower facility is available within the building to start emergency washing within 5 minutes of the contact.
Same location criteria as for moderate risk eyewash facility except that the supplementary emergency washing facility for locations beyond 30 m must be a unit such as non-tempered drench hose.Same location criteria as for low risk eyewash facility.

Valve operation

5.96   The employer must ensure that a valve which activates an emergency eyewash or shower facility is designed so that, once activated, the flow of water or flushing solution will continue without requiring the use of the operator's hands.

Emergency Procedures

Emergency plan

5.97   (1) A workplace must have a written emergency plan, appropriate to the hazards of the workplace, that addresses the requirements of sections 5.98 to 5.102.

(2) The plan must address emergency conditions which may arise from within the workplace and from adjacent workplaces.

(3) The plan must be developed, implemented and annually reviewed in consultation with the joint committee or the worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 41.]

Inventory

5.98   (1) An inventory must be maintained which identifies all hazardous substances at the workplace in quantities that may endanger workers in an emergency including hazardous products covered by WHMIS, explosives, pesticides, radioactive materials, hazardous wastes, and consumer products.

(2) The inventory must identify the nature, location, and approximate quantity of all such substances, and the location of SDSs.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 28.]

Risk assessment

5.99   An employer must ensure that an assessment is conducted of the risks posed by hazardous substances from accidental release, fire or other such emergency.

Procedures for evacuation

5.100   (1) Written evacuation procedures appropriate to the risk must be developed and implemented to

(a) notify workers, including the first aid attendant, of the nature and location of the emergency,

(b) evacuate workers safely,

(c) check and confirm the safe evacuation of all workers,

(d) notify the fire department or other emergency responders, and

(e) notify adjacent workplaces or residences which may be affected if the risk of exposure to a substance extends beyond the workplace.

(2) Notification of the public must be in conformity with the requirements of other jurisdictions, including provincial and municipal agencies.

Procedures for spill cleanup and re-entry

5.101   If workers are required to control a release of a hazardous substance, to perform cleanup of a spill, or to carry out testing before re-entry, the employer must provide

(a) adequate written safe work procedures,

(b) appropriate personal protective equipment which is readily available to workers and is adequately maintained, and

(c) material or equipment necessary for the control and disposal of the hazardous substance.

Training and drills

5.102   The employer must

(a) provide training in the appropriate emergency procedures to all workers who may be affected, and

(b) conduct drills to test the adequacy of procedures and to ensure that workers and supervisors are familiar with their roles and responsibilities.

Table 5-4: Repealed

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 315/2003, App. A, s. 12.]

Part 6 — Substance Specific Requirements

Asbestos

Definitions

6.1   In this section and sections 6.2 to 6.32:

"asbestos-containing material" means the following:

(a) a manufactured article or other material, other than vermiculite insulation, that would be determined to contain at least 0.5% asbestos if tested in accordance with one of the following methods:

(i) Asbestos, Chrysotile by XRD, Method 9000 (Issue 2, dated August 15, 1994) in the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods, published by the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;

(ii) Asbestos (bulk) by PLM, Method 9002 (Issue 2, dated August 15, 1994) in the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods, published by the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;

(iii) Test Method for the Determination of Asbestos in Bulk Building Materials (EPA/600/R-93/116, dated July 1993) published by the United States Environmental Protection Agency;

(b) vermiculite insulation that would be determined to contain any asbestos if tested in accordance with the Research Method for Sampling and Analysis of Fibrous Amphibole in Vermiculite Attic Insulation (EPA/600/R-04/004, dated January 2004) published by the United States Environmental Protection Agency;

"clean room" means a room in a high risk decontamination facility which is used by workers to change from street clothes into protective work clothing and equipment prior to entering the designated work area;

"clearance air sampling" means sampling to determine if the air inside a containment of a high risk work activity is sufficiently free of asbestos fibre to permit the dismantling of the containment;

"containment" means an isolation system designed to effectively contain asbestos fibre within a designated work area where asbestos-containing material is handled, removed, encapsulated or enclosed, and includes a glove bag;

"decontamination facility" means a series of rooms constructed so as to allow a person to enter and leave a containment without spreading asbestos fibre or waste material beyond the designated work area;

"designated work area" means an area for work with asbestos-containing material which is restricted to access by authorized persons by warning signs and by barricades, enclosures or other means of isolation, with due regard for the level of risk;

"encapsulation" means treatment of an asbestos-containing material or surface with a sealant which penetrates the material and binds the fibres together;

"enclosure" means isolation of asbestos-containing material from adjacent occupied areas in a building by physical barriers such as gyproc, plywood, or metal sheeting, to prevent the release of airborne asbestos fibres into these areas;

"friable asbestos-containing material" means asbestos-containing material that is crumbled or powdered or can be crumbled or powdered by hand pressure;

"high risk work activity" means a work activity that involves working with or in proximity to asbestos-containing material if a high level of control is necessary in respect of that activity to prevent exposure of a worker to airborne asbestos fibre;

"low risk work activity" means a work activity that involves working with or in proximity to asbestos-containing material if, at the time the work activity is being carried out, both of the following apply:

(a) the asbestos-containing material is not being

(i) cut, sanded, drilled, broken, ground down or otherwise fragmented, or

(ii) disturbed such that the asbestos-containing material may release airborne asbestos fibre;

(b) it is not necessary to use personal protective equipment or engineering controls in respect of that activity to prevent exposure of a worker to airborne asbestos fibre;

"moderate risk work activity" means a work activity, other than a high risk work activity, that involves working with or in proximity to asbestos-containing material if, at the time the work activity is being carried out, one or both of the following apply:

(a) the asbestos-containing material is being

(i) cut, sanded, drilled, broken, ground down or otherwise fragmented, or

(ii) disturbed such that the asbestos-containing material may release airborne asbestos fibre;

(b) it is necessary to use personal protective equipment or engineering controls, or both, in respect of that activity to prevent exposure of a worker to airborne asbestos fibre;

"qualified person" means a person who

(a) has knowledge of the management and control of asbestos hazards through education and training, and

(b) has experience in the management and control of asbestos hazards.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 7; 19/2006, s. 2; 188/2011, App. B, s. 1.]

Application

6.2   Sections 6.3 to 6.32 apply to a workplace where a worker is or may be exposed to potentially harmful levels of asbestos fibre, including a workplace where asbestos-containing material is present.

[en. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 2.]

General Requirements

Exposure control plan

6.3   (1) If a worker is or may be exposed to potentially harmful levels of asbestos, the employer must develop and implement an exposure control plan meeting the requirements of section 5.54.

(2) To ensure adequate coordination of the overall plan, the employer must ensure that it is administered by a properly trained person.

Inventory

6.4   (1) The employer and the owner must ensure that a qualified person

(a) collects representative samples of the materials in the workplace that the qualified person suspects contain asbestos,

(b) determines whether each of the samples is asbestos-containing material in accordance with,

(i) in the case of a sample that is not vermiculite insulation, one of the methods set out in paragraph (a) (i) to (iii) of the definition of "asbestos-containing material" in section 6.1, and

(ii) in the case of a sample that is vermiculite insulation, the method set out in paragraph (b) of the definition of "asbestos-containing material" in section 6.1, and

(c) prepares an inventory of all asbestos-containing materials in the workplace that includes the following information:

(i) with respect to each representative sample collected under paragraph (a),

(A) the specific location of the sample,

(B) a description of the sample,

(C) whether the sample is asbestos-containing material as determined under paragraph (b),

(D) the method, set out in paragraph (a) (i) to (iii) or (b) of the definition of "asbestos-containing material" in section 6.1, used to determine if the sample is asbestos-containing material, and

(E) if the sample is determined to be asbestos-containing material, the type of asbestos, as determined under paragraph (b), and the percentage of the sample that is comprised of that asbestos;

(ii) with respect to each material that, under subsection (2), is treated under this Part as asbestos-containing material because it is inaccessible or not practicable to sample,

(A) the specific location of the material or, if the specific location is not known, the presumed location of the material,

(B) a description of the material, and

(C) how it is determined that the material is inaccessible or not practicable to sample;

(iii) the location of each of the asbestos-containing materials, including by using drawings, plans or specifications.

(2) If a qualified person suspects that a material in the workplace contains asbestos but determines that the material is inaccessible or not practicable to sample, the material must be treated under this Part as asbestos-containing material unless a qualified person, in accordance with subsection (1), determines that the material is not asbestos-containing material.

(3) The employer or the owner satisfies his or her obligations under subsection (1) if the employer or the owner ensures that an existing inventory of all asbestos­containing materials in the workplace meets the requirements of subsection (1).

(4) The employer and the owner must

(a) keep the inventory current, and

(b) make a record of any changes made to the inventory.

(5) The employer and the owner must provide each other with a copy of the inventory and record referred to in subsection (4) if the other does not already have a copy.

(6) The employer must ensure that a copy of the current version of the inventory is readily available at the workplace.

(7) The employer and the owner must retain

(a) the current version of the inventory until all the asbestos-containing materials are removed from the workplace, and

(b) the record referred to in subsection (4) (b).

[en. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 3; am. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. E, s. 1.]

Identification

6.5   The employer and the owner must ensure that all asbestos-containing materials present in the workplace are identified by signs, labels or, when these are not practicable, other effective means.

[am. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. E, s. 2.]

Assessment and classification

6.6   (1) The employer must ensure that a risk assessment is conducted by a qualified person on asbestos-containing material identified in the inventory referred to in section 6.4 (1) (c) or (3), as applicable, with due regard for the condition of the material, its friability, accessibility and likelihood of damage, and the potential for fibre release and exposure of workers.

(2) The employer must ensure that a risk assessment has been conducted by a qualified person before any demolition, alteration, or repair of machinery, equipment, or structures where asbestos-containing material may be disturbed.

(3) Before a work activity that involves working with or in proximity to asbestos-containing material begins the employer must ensure that a qualified person assesses the work activity and classifies it as a low risk work activity, a moderate risk work activity or a high risk work activity.

(4) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 4 (d).]

[am. B.C. Regs. 188/2011, App. B, s. 4; 9/2017, App. E, s. 3.]

Control of asbestos fibre

6.7   (1) The employer must ensure that all friable asbestos-containing materials in the workplace are controlled by removal, enclosure or encapsulation so as to prevent the release of airborne asbestos fibre.

(2) The employer must not allow any work that would disturb asbestos-containing material unless necessary precautions have been taken to protect workers.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 5.]

Procedures

6.8   (1) The employer must ensure that procedures for handling or using asbestos-containing material prevent or minimize the release of airborne asbestos fibres.

(2) The employer must ensure that the procedures for control, handling or use of asbestos are in accordance with procedures acceptable to the Board.

(3) The procedures must address

(a) containment of asbestos operations where applicable,

(b) control of the release of asbestos fibre,

(c) provision, use and maintenance of appropriate personal protective equipment and clothing,

(d) means for the decontamination of workers, and

(e) removal of asbestos waste and cleanup of asbestos waste material.

(4) The procedures must provide a worker with task-specific work direction that addresses both hazards and necessary controls.

Prohibitions

6.9   (1) Except for waste intended for disposal, the employer must ensure crocidolite asbestos or material containing crocidolite asbestos is not brought into or used in a workplace.

(2) The spraying of asbestos or asbestos-containing material is not permitted.

(3) Pressure spraying equipment of any type must not be used to remove asbestos insulation or other asbestos-containing material from buildings or structures.

(4) The employer must not permit the use of compressed air to clean up or remove asbestos dust or debris, or dry sweeping or dry mopping of asbestos waste.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 6.]

Substitution

6.10   (1) The employer must substitute material less hazardous than asbestos-containing material when practicable.

(2) If such substitution is not practicable, the employer must document the reasons why less hazardous material cannot be substituted for asbestos-containing material, and make this documentation available to workers and to the joint committee or the worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 43; 188/2011, App. B, s. 7.]

Instruction and training

6.11   The employer must ensure that a worker who is at risk of exposure to asbestos is adequately instructed and trained in

(a) the hazards of asbestos,

(b) the means of identifying asbestos-containing material at the worksite,

(c) the work procedures to be followed,

(d) the correct use of the required personal protective equipment, and operation of the required engineering controls, and

(e) the purpose and significance of any required health monitoring.

Monitoring

6.12   (1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. D, s. 4 (a).]

(2) During a high risk work activity, except where glove bags are used as the containment, the employer must sample for airborne asbestos fibre in

(a) areas outside of the containment but in its vicinity, at least daily if there are unprotected workers in the area,

(b) the clean room, at least daily during removal and cleanup operations, and

(c) contaminated areas inside the containment, as necessary during removal and cleanup to ensure that workers are adequately protected.

(3) The employer must make the results of all air samples taken during a high risk work activity available to the workers involved, within 24 hours of completing the collection of the samples.

(4) Except where glove bags are used as the containment, prior to dismantling a containment used in a high risk work activity and after all asbestos waste has been cleaned up, removed or otherwise controlled, the employer must ensure that

(a) clearance air sampling is conducted in previously contaminated areas inside the containment, and

(b) the airborne asbestos fibre levels in these areas do not exceed 0.02 f/ml.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. D, s. 4; 188/2011, App. B, s. 8.]

Designated Work Areas and Containments

Designated area

6.13   (1) Before starting work with asbestos-containing material, the employer must, with due regard for the level of risk,

(a) identify and mark the boundary of the designated work area by barricades, fences, or similar means,

(b) ensure that the immediate work area is cleared of objects, materials and equipment other than that required to do the work, and

(c) ensure that windows, doorways and all other openings are adequately secured to prevent the release of asbestos fibre into other work areas.

(2) The employer must post signs at the boundaries of the designated work area indicating asbestos work is in progress, the hazards, and the precautions required for entering the work area.

(3) The employer must restrict entry into the designated work area to authorized persons who are adequately protected against the level of risk within the designated work area.

Permanent enclosure design

6.14   When asbestos-containing material in the workplace is controlled by a permanent enclosure, the employer must ensure that the enclosure is airtight, and if practicable, that electrical, plumbing, ventilation and similar services are located outside the enclosure.

Glove bags

6.15   The employer must ensure that when a prefabricated glove bag is used for the removal of asbestos insulation from pipes, ducts and similar structures

(a) the glove bag is sealed to prevent the release of asbestos fibres into the work area outside the bag,

(b) waste materials on surfaces are washed to the bottom of the glove bag and all exposed asbestos insulation is encapsulated while inside the glove bag enclosure,

(c) all glove bags are evacuated through a HEPA vacuum to remove the air inside the bag, prior to removal of the bag, and

(d) after removing the glove bag, all exposed surfaces are cleaned again.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 6.]

High risk work

6.16   (1) For high risk work activity the employer must provide and maintain a containment and a decontamination facility, except that a decontamination facility is not required if the containment is a glove bag.

(2) The employer must inspect a containment and a decontamination facility used for high risk work activity at least daily to ensure their effectiveness is maintained.

(3) The employer must ensure that the design of the decontamination facility includes

(a) a physical connection to the containment,

(b) a shower facility, and

(c) provision for the safe entry and exit of workers.

(4) If the high risk work activity involves encapsulation of asbestos-containing material, the employer must ensure that the encapsulant penetrates the material and effectively binds the asbestos fibres together, and has not disturbed the bonding of the material to the supporting surface.

(5) At the completion of a high risk work activity and before dismantling the containment, the employer must

(a) visually inspect the area inside the containment to ensure that an effective cleanup has been completed, and

(b) treat all exposed surfaces inside the containment with a sealant to bind any remaining asbestos fibres and prevent them from becoming airborne.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 8.]

Ventilation

Containment ventilation

6.17   The employer must, with the exception of a glove bag, ventilate a containment to ensure that

(a) air flows only from clean outside areas into the contaminated area,

(b) exhaust air from the containment ventilation system is directed to the outdoors through an effective HEPA filter, and

(c) there is an inward airflow through the decontamination facility into the containment.

Local exhaust ventilation

6.18   The employer must provide local exhaust ventilation with exhaust air discharged through a HEPA filter for all dust-producing operations outside a containment where asbestos-containing material is handled or used.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 9.]

Filter testing

6.19   (1) The employer must assess the effectiveness of HEPA filters by DOP (dioctyl phthalate) testing or similar means at least annually, after a HEPA filter is replaced in a vacuum cleaner or ventilation system, and before use in high risk work activity.

(2) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 7.]

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 7.]

Other Means of Controlling Exposure to Asbestos

Protecting work surfaces

6.20   (1) Before starting work where exposed friable asbestos-containing material is present or asbestos-containing material has been handled, the employer must remove all asbestos dust from contaminated work surfaces with a damp cloth or similar material, or with a vacuum cleaner equipped with a HEPA-filtered exhaust.

(2) Work surfaces in the work area must be kept as free as practicable from accumulations of asbestos dust.

(3) Work surfaces in a designated work area must, with due regard for the level of risk, be covered with plastic sheets, tarpaulins or similar materials to help control the spread of asbestos-containing material.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 10.]

Preventing spread

6.21   The employer must prevent the spread of asbestos dust and debris to other work areas during the work.

Wetting material

6.22   Asbestos-containing material that is to be removed or disturbed must be effectively wetted before and during the work, whenever practicable.

Repairing damaged material

6.23   When damaged asbestos-containing material is repaired, the employer must ensure that

(a) the repair methods will seal all exposed, friable ends or edges, and

(b) the methods used disturb the least amount of asbestos-containing material necessary to complete the repair.

Friction materials

6.24   If automotive service procedures may involve friction material that is asbestos-containing material or dust arising from such material, the employer must ensure that the following control measures are implemented:

(a) dry removal of friction material dust from automotive assemblies using compressed air, brushes, or other similar means is prohibited;

(b) service work areas where friction material is handled are posted with signs to advise workers of the hazards and required precautions;

(c) suitable work procedures are followed to minimize the generation of airborne dust;

(d) a worker handling equipment or assemblies contaminated with dust from friction material, outside of a HEPA-filtered vacuum enclosure system, wears suitable personal protective equipment, including disposable coveralls and at least a HEPA-filtered dual cartridge half face respirator;

(e) waste material that may be contaminated with asbestos is promptly collected and disposed of in accordance with applicable requirements;

(f) contaminated tools, equipment and work surfaces are cleaned after work is completed.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 11.]

Waste Handling and Disposal

Sealed containers

6.25   The employer must ensure that all asbestos waste and other waste contaminated with asbestos, including disposable protective clothing and cleanup equipment, is placed into sealed containers which are labelled as containing asbestos.

Cleaning containers and equipment

6.26   (1) The employer must ensure that the exterior of a container of asbestos waste is cleaned with a damp cloth or a vacuum cleaner equipped with a HEPA-filtered exhaust before being removed from a designated work area.

(2) Reusable tools and equipment contaminated with asbestos must be cleaned after work is completed.

Waste removal

6.27   (1) Before any work involving asbestos takes place, the employer must ensure that procedures for the safe removal of asbestos dust and debris from the work area are set out in writing by a qualified person.

(2) The written procedures must

(a) comply with the requirements set out in section 6.8,

(b) provide for removal of asbestos dust and debris from the work area

(i) while work is in progress, at intervals necessary to eliminate or minimize the risk of exposure,

(ii) at the end of each work shift, and

(iii) at the completion of work involving asbestos, and

(c) consider the nature of the asbestos dust and debris to be removed and provide specific direction regarding which of the following removal methods, or combination of the following removal methods, is most appropriate for safe removal of that asbestos dust and debris in relation to each of the times set out in paragraph (b) (i), (ii) and (iii):

(i) using a vacuum cleaner, or similar device, that is equipped with a HEPA-filtered exhaust;

(ii) wiping surfaces with a damp cloth or sponge to remove residual amounts of asbestos dust and debris;

(iii) wet sweeping or wet mopping to remove larger amounts of asbestos dust and debris;

(iv) using a shovel or similar device to place larger amounts of dampened asbestos debris into the sealed container required by section 6.25;

(v) using another method that is acceptable to the Board.

(3) The employer must ensure that

(a) every worker who is engaged in asbestos dust and debris removal at the work area is adequately instructed and trained in the written procedures of the qualified person under this section, and

(b) the written procedures of the qualified person are followed.

[en. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. M, s. 1.]

Waste disposal

6.28   The employer must dispose of containers of asbestos waste promptly to prevent the accumulation of large amounts of asbestos waste.

Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment

Respiratory protection

6.29   (1) The employer must supply, and ensure that workers within a designated work area wear, respirators which are adequate for the anticipated level of exposure.

(2) The employer must ensure that a single use respirator is not used for protection against asbestos.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. G, s. 2.]

Protective clothing

6.30   (1) The employer must ensure that all persons within a designated work area wear protective clothing which is made of material resistant to penetration by asbestos fibres, fits snugly at the neck, wrists and ankles, and as necessary to protect against the risk, covers the head and feet as well as the body.

(2) The employer must replace or repair any torn or damaged protective clothing immediately.

(3) Before a worker removes protective clothing and equipment, the employer must ensure that the worker cleans this gear with a damp cloth or a vacuum cleaner equipped with a HEPA-filtered exhaust.

(4) The employer must ensure that a worker removes protective clothing and equipment before leaving the designated work area.

(5) The employer must ensure that protective clothing contaminated with asbestos is, before reuse, cleaned with a vacuum cleaner equipped with a HEPA-filtered exhaust, and placed in a water-soluble plastic bag, which is sealed and labelled before being sent to an acceptable laundry facility.

Information to laundry workers

6.31   The employer must ensure that workers who launder clothing contaminated with asbestos are informed of the hazards of asbestos and the precautions required for handling the clothing.

Documentation

Retention of records

6.32   The employer must maintain, for at least 10 years, the following records respecting asbestos-containing materials:

(a) risk assessments;

(b) inspections;

(c) air monitoring results;

(d) instruction and training of workers;

(e) incident investigation reports.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. E, s. 4.]

Biological Agents

Definitions

6.33   In sections 6.33 to 6.40:

"medical sharp" means a needle device, scalpel, lancet or any other medical device that can reasonably be expected to make parenteral contact;

"occupational exposure" means reasonably anticipated contact with a biological agent, that is designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1, resulting from the performance of a worker's duties;

"parenteral contact" means piercing of mucous membranes or the skin;

"precautionary principle" means adopting provisional precautions covering all routes of transmission, based on a higher level of protection, when the identity, aetiology or routes of transmission of the biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1 have not been established;

"route of transmission" means any route by which a biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1 may be transmitted including contact, droplet or airborne transmission;

"safety-engineered medical sharp" means a medical sharp with a built-in safety feature or mechanism that eliminates or minimizes the risk of accidental parenteral contact while or after the sharp is used;

"safety-engineered needle" includes a self-sheathing needle device and a retractable needle system;

"standard or routine infection control precautions" means safe work practices as defined by the Practical Guidelines for Infection Control in Health Care Facilities issued by the World Health Organization, as amended from time to time, and the Infectious Diseases, Routine Practices and Additional Precautions for Preventing the Transmission of Infection in Health Care guidelines issued by Health Canada, as amended from time to time;

"transmission-based precautions" means safe work practices based on the route of transmission as defined by the Practical Guidelines for Infection Control in Health Care Facilities issued by the World Health Organization, as amended from time to time, and the Infectious Diseases, Routine Practices and Additional Precautions for Preventing the Transmission of Infection in Health Care guidelines issued by Health Canada, as amended from time to time.

[am. B.C. Regs. 241/2006, s. 1; 106/2007, s. 1; 319/2007, App. A, s. 6.]

Exposure control plan

6.34   (1) If a worker has or may have occupational exposure, the employer must develop and implement an exposure control plan, based on the precautionary principle, that meets the requirements of section 5.54 and that includes the following:

(a) a risk assessment conducted by a qualified person to determine if there is a potential for occupational exposure by any route of transmission;

(b) a list of all work activities for which there is a potential for occupational exposure;

(c) engineering controls and administrative controls to eliminate or minimize the potential for occupational exposure;

(d) standard or routine infection control precautions and transmission-based precautions for all work activities that have been identified as having a potential for occupational exposure, including

(i) housekeeping practices designed to keep the workplace clean and free from spills, splashes or other accidental contamination,

(ii) work procedures to ensure that contaminated laundry is isolated, bagged and handled as little as possible, and

(iii) work procedures to ensure that laboratory or other samples containing a biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1 are handled in accordance with the Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines 3rd edition, 2004, issued by the Public Health Agency of Canada;

(e) a description of personal protective equipment designed to eliminate or minimize occupational exposure;

(f) a program to inform workers about the contents of the exposure control plan and to provide them with adequate education, training and supervision to work safely with, and in proximity to, a biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1;

(g) a record of all training and education provided to workers in the program described in paragraph (f);

(h) a record of all workers who have been exposed, while performing work activities, to a biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1.

[en. B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 7; am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. N, s. 2.]

Repealed

6.35   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 8.]

Controls

6.36   (1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 9.]

(1.1) On and after January 1, 2008, a needleless device or safety-engineered hollow bore needle must be used for the following procedures performed to care for or treat a person:

(a) withdrawal of body fluids;

(b) accessing a vein or artery;

(c) administration of medications or fluids;

(d) any other procedure involving the potential for an exposure to accidental parenteral contact for which a needleless system or safety-engineered hollow bore needle system is available.

(1.2) On and after October 1, 2008, any medical sharp used to care for or treat a person must be a safety-engineered medical sharp.

(1.3) Subsections (1.1) and (1.2) do not apply if

(a) use of the required device, needle or sharp is not clinically appropriate in the particular circumstances, or

(b) the required device, needle or sharp is not available in commercial markets.

(1.4) If more than one type of safety-engineered hollow bore needle or safety-engineered medical sharp is available in commercial markets, the needle or sharp that provides the highest level of protection from accidental parenteral contact must be used.

(1.5) For purposes of subsection (1.4), an employer must make a determination of the highest level of protection available based on information provided by manufacturers, independent testing agencies, objective product evaluation, or other reliable sources.

(1.6) Safe work procedures and practices relating to the use of safety-engineered hollow bore needles and safety-engineered medical sharps must be developed and implemented before use of these devices.

(2) to (4) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 9.]

(5) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. E, s. 3.]

(6) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 9.]

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. E, s. 3; 241/2006, s. 2; 106/2007, ss. 2 and 3; 319/2007, App. A, s. 9.]

Labels and identification

6.37   (1) A container holding a known or suspected biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1 must be clearly identified by the biohazard symbol as described in the Hazardous Products Regulations (Canada) or by other means that indicates the presence of a biological agent.

(2) A laboratory sample of a known or suspected biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1 must be transported only in accordance with the federal Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 (Canada).

[en. B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 10; am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 29.]

Repealed

6.38   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 11.]

Vaccination

6.39   (1) An employer must offer vaccination against the hepatitis B virus to all workers who are at risk of occupational exposure to that virus.

(2) If the Communicable Disease Control Immunization Program Manual issued by the BC Centre for Disease Control, as amended from time to time, lists a vaccine that protects against infection by a biological agent that is designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1, the employer must offer the vaccination to all workers who are at risk of occupational exposure to that biological agent.

(3) Vaccinations offered under subsections (1) and (2) must be provided without cost to workers.

[en. B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 12.]

Medical evaluation

6.40   If a worker may have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus or any other biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1, the employer must advise the worker to seek immediate medical evaluation.

[en. B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 13.]

Repealed

6.41   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. A, s. 14.]

Cytotoxic Drugs

Definition

6.42   In sections 6.43 to 6.58:

"cytotoxic drug" means an agent that possesses a specific destructive action on certain cells or that may be genotoxic, oncogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, or hazardous to cells in any way and includes most anti-cancer drugs.

Exposure control plan

6.43   If a worker is or may be occupationally exposed to a cytotoxic drug, the employer must develop and implement an exposure control plan meeting the requirements of section 5.54.

Information

6.44   If a cytotoxic drug is received, prepared, administered, stored or disposed of at a workplace, the employer must maintain and make readily available to workers information on its

(a) acute and chronic toxicity, including any potential reproductive hazard,

(b) acute exposure treatment, and

(c) safe handling.

[am. B.C. Reg. 21/2006, s. 1.]

Labels

6.45   A container of a cytotoxic drug and a shelf or bin where a cytotoxic drug is regularly stored must be appropriately labelled.

Signs

6.46   Warning signs which are clearly visible and clearly state the identified hazards must be posted in all areas where cytotoxic drugs are stored or mixed.

List

6.47   Storage and preparation areas for cytotoxic drugs must be posted with a list of all cytotoxic drugs present in the workplace.

Procedures

6.48   (1) When a cytotoxic drug is received, prepared, administered, stored or disposed of, written safe work procedures must be developed and implemented for applicable aspects of receiving, storage, preparation, administration and waste handling.

(2) The work procedures required by subsection (1) must be readily available for reference by workers and where practicable, summaries of relevant procedures must be posted in the appropriate work areas.

[am. B.C. Reg. 21/2006, s. 2.]

Reproductive toxins

6.49   (1) At any worksite where a worker is occupationally exposed to a cytotoxic drug that is a reproductive toxin, the employer must develop policy and procedures appropriate to the risk, which may include protective reassignment.

(2) The policy and procedures must inform workers about the reproductive toxin and identify ways to minimize exposure to the reproductive toxin for a worker who has advised the employer of pregnancy or intent to conceive a child.

Instruction

6.50   (1) A worker involved in any aspect of handling a cytotoxic drug must receive pre-job education and on-the-job training on the handling of this substance.

(2) The instruction required by subsection (1) must address the

(a) known health risks, including any potential reproductive hazards,

(b) relevant techniques and procedures for safe handling,

(c) proper use of protective equipment and materials, and

(d) spill and waste disposal procedures.

(3) The adequacy of instruction must be assessed when required by a change in the substance used, information available on the substance or a change in work procedures, and retraining provided where necessary.

Supervision

6.51   A worker involved in any aspect of cytotoxic drug handling must be effectively supervised.

Records

6.52   (1) The employer must maintain a record of all workers who prepare or administer cytotoxic drugs, including the name of the drugs handled, and when practicable, the number of preparations or administrations per week.

(2) Exposure records must be maintained for the duration of employment plus 10 years, and training records for 3 years from the date that the training occurred.

Drug preparation and administration

6.53   (1) All mixing, preparation and priming of administration sets with a cytotoxic drug must be performed in one centralized area in a specially designated Class II Type B biological safety cabinet that

(a) is exhausted to the outside atmosphere in a manner that prevents recirculation into any work area,

(b) has exhaust and ventilation systems that remain in operation for a sufficient period of time to ensure that no contaminants escape from the biological safety cabinet into the workplace, and

(c) is equipped with a continuous monitoring device to permit confirmation of adequate airflow and cabinet performance.

(2) The administration of cytotoxic drugs must be done by following safe work procedures.

[am. B.C. Reg. 21/2006, s. 3.]

Disconnects

6.54   Syringes and intravenous sets used for cytotoxic drugs must have appropriate fittings, such as Luer locking fittings, which prevent accidental disconnection.

[am. B.C. Reg. 21/2006, s. 4.]

Personal protective equipment

6.55   (1) Adequate personal protective equipment must be provided and worn whenever there is a risk of contact with a cytotoxic drug.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1) personal protective equipment includes

(a) medical gloves that are manufactured and designed for use when handling cytotoxic drugs,

(b) a moisture resistant, long-sleeved gown with cuffs,

(c) if there is a risk of contact with aerosols, an approved respirator, and

(d) if there is a risk of eye contact, eye and face protection.

(3) Used gowns and gloves must not be worn outside the preparation, administration or storage area and must be handled as hazardous waste or contaminated linen.

(4) All other non-disposable personal protective equipment must be cleaned immediately after use.

[am. B.C. Reg. 21/2006, s. 5.]

Personal hygiene

6.56   Eating, drinking, smoking, application of cosmetics or storage of food is prohibited in any area where a cytotoxic drug is mixed, administered or stored.

Waste disposal

6.57   (1) Adequate, leak-proof waste disposal containers, including sharps and solids containers, and distinctive plastic waste bags must be available in every area where cytotoxic drugs are prepared, administered or stored, and all cytotoxic drug-related waste must be placed into these containers or bags.

(2) Any excreta from a patient being treated with cytotoxic drugs that is handled by a worker must be treated as cytotoxic drug-related waste.

[am. B.C. Reg. 21/2006, s. 6.]

Spills

6.58   (1) Written emergency procedures to address spills of a cytotoxic drug must be developed and implemented which address requirements for small spill cleanup, both inside and outside the biological safety cabinet, large spill cleanup, and personal decontamination.

(2) Spill kits, clearly labelled, must be kept in or near cytotoxic drug preparation, administration and storage areas and a sign detailing spill procedures must be posted in all such areas.

[am. B.C. Reg. 21/2006, s. 7.]

Lead

Definitions

6.58.1   In this section and in sections 6.59 to 6.69:

"coating" means paint or any similar material that

(a) contains lead, and

(b) forms a film when dry;

"exposure limit" means the applicable exposure limit as referred to in section 5.48;

"exposure monitoring" means

(a) air and surface monitoring conducted in accordance with section 5.53 (4), and

(b) air monitoring conducted in accordance with section 6.61;

"health monitoring" means that part of a health protection program that monitors and assesses individual workers through clinical medical examinations, by measuring and determining lead amounts in capillary or venous blood, and by other tests, for the purpose of identifying changes in the worker's health status due to occupational exposure to lead;

"inorganic lead" means elemental lead, inorganic compounds of lead and lead chromate, but does not include organic compounds of lead;

"lead process" means the following work activities and processes, as well as any other work activity or process, involving the manufacturing, processing or handling of lead, or of materials, products or coatings containing lead that may expose a worker to lead dust, fumes or mist:

(a) abrasive blasting;

(b) applying electric arc, oxy-acetylene, oxy gas, plasma arc or a flame for the purpose of welding, cutting or cleaning the surface of any structure;

(c) demolishing, removing or encapsulating materials;

(d) dry sanding or scraping, grinding, cutting or buffing;

(e) using lead in fire assay;

(f) cleaning up contamination;

(g) hot cutting in demolition, dismantling or salvage operations;

(h) manufacturing, assembling, handling or repairing lead-acid storage batteries, and sorting, packing and handling plates or other lead-containing parts that are removed or recovered from lead-acid storage batteries;

(i) manufacturing, assembling, handling, testing or firing of lead-containing weapons, detonators or other explosives;

(j) mixing and blending lead in plastics, coatings, moulding powders and stabilizers;

(k) mixing and melting processes in the glass industry;

(l) constructing, installing, altering, repairing or renovating structures, substrates, mechanical or engineered systems, or parts of any of these;

(m) smelting, refining, alloying, melting and casting;

(n) spray painting;

(o) repairing radiators;

(p) recycling or scrap-processing;

(q) transporting, disposing, storing or containing lead or materials containing lead;

(r) using a power tool, high pressure water jets or other mechanical means to cut, sand, buff or remove a surface coating;

"medical removal" means the temporary removal of a worker from a work activity involving a lead process if health monitoring, conducted under the supervision of a physician, indicates that the worker is at risk of suffering adverse health effects from continued exposure to lead;

"risk assessment" means a risk assessment conducted under section 6.59.1.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 1.]

Application

6.59   Sections 6.59.1 to 6.69 apply to a workplace where a worker is or may be

(a) engaged in a lead process, or

(b) exposed to potentially harmful levels of inorganic lead dust, fumes or mist.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 2.]

Risk assessment

6.59.1   (1) In this section, "existing monitoring data" means data

(a) gathered under section 5.53 or 6.61, or

(b) as described in section 6.61.1 (2) (b).

(2) An employer must not permit workers to engage in a work activity or lead process that may expose workers to lead dust, fumes or mist unless a risk assessment has first been completed by a qualified person.

(3) The risk assessment must include consideration of all of the following:

(a) the hazards of lead, including the exposure limit;

(b) any information contained on a label or in a safety data sheet provided by a supplier, manufacturer or employer in respect of

(i) the lead content in the materials, coatings or products to be used in the lead process, and

(ii) the health effects of lead exposure;

(c) the scope, circumstances and nature of the work activity or lead process, including

(i) whether section 5.50 applies, given the length of a shift,

(ii) any changes between shifts in the scope, circumstances or nature of the work activity or lead process,

(iii) whether the work activity involves welding, soldering, brazing, cutting or other hot work processes,

(iv) the potential routes of exposure to lead dust, fumes or mist during the work activity or while engaging in the lead process, including by inhalation or ingestion,

(v) the potential level and duration of the exposure referred to in subparagraph (iv), and

(vi) the results of any relevant health monitoring, if applicable, conducted

(A) in relation to an exposure control plan under section 5.54 (2) (f), or

(B) as part of a health protection program under section 6.67;

(d) the effectiveness of existing and planned control measures, as determined through exposure monitoring, to prevent or minimize worker exposure to lead dust, fumes or mist, including with respect to access to the workplace by unprotected workers;

(e) any additional information the employer needs to complete the risk assessment.

(4) A qualified person may rely on existing monitoring data for the purpose of assessing control measures under subsection (3) (d) only if it is reasonable to do so based on both of the following:

(a) the relevance of the existing monitoring data and whether additional exposure monitoring may be needed to reassess the effectiveness of existing and planned control measures because of changes in personnel or to the scope, circumstances or nature of the work activity or lead process;

(b) if applicable and available, the results of any health monitoring conducted on workers since the existing monitoring data was gathered.

(5) An employer must ensure that a risk assessment is reviewed by a qualified person if any of the following occur:

(a) there is reason to believe the risk assessment is no longer valid;

(b) there has been a significant change in the scope, circumstances or nature of the work activity or lead process to which the risk assessment relates;

(c) the results of any exposure monitoring or health monitoring show it to be necessary.

(6) If changes to the risk assessment are necessary as a result of the review under subsection (5), the employer must ensure that the risk assessment is changed accordingly.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 3.]

Exposure control plan

6.60   (1) If a risk assessment indicates that a worker is or may be exposed to lead dust, fumes or mist, the employer must

(a) ensure that a qualified person develops an exposure control plan meeting the requirements of sections 5.54 and 5.57 (2), and of subsection (3) of this section, and

(b) implement the exposure control plan.

(2) If a risk assessment is changed under section 6.59.1 (6), the employer must ensure that

(a) the exposure control plan is amended to address the changes to the risk assessment, and

(b) the amendments to the exposure control plan are implemented.

(3) For the purposes of section 5.54 (2) (d), the written work procedures within an exposure control plan must address at least the following:

(a) the containment of lead processes through the use of enclosures, barriers or encapsulation, if used as a control measure;

(b) the effective control of worker exposure to lead dust, fumes or mist, including worker decontamination and personal hygiene;

(c) safe work practices and procedures;

(d) the correct selection, use, care and maintenance of any required personal protective equipment and clothing;

(e) emergency procedures;

(f) the removal, cleanup and disposal of lead dust and debris, including the measures that will be used for the purposes of meeting the requirements of section 6.64.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 4.]

Elimination or control of exposure

6.60.1   (1) An employer must, to the extent it is practicable,

(a) avoid the use of materials, products or coatings containing lead that may expose a worker to lead dust, fumes or mist, and

(b) replace materials, products and coatings referred to in paragraph (a) with substances or processes that, under normal conditions of use, eliminate the risk of worker exposure to lead dust, fumes or mist.

(2) If it is not practicable to eliminate the risk of worker exposure to lead dust, fumes or mist, the employer must control the risk below the applicable exposure limit under section 5.48 by applying control measures that

(a) are appropriate to the work activity,

(b) are consistent with the risk assessment and with sections 5.55 and 5.57, and

(c) include, in order of priority,

(i) the design and use of engineering controls, including appropriate lead dust, fumes or mist reduction systems, containment of lead processes, and the provision and use of suitable work equipment and materials,

(ii) the control of exposure to lead dust, fumes or mist through administrative controls, including work practice controls, and

(iii) if the control measures set out in paragraphs (i) and (ii) are not adequate to control exposure, the provision and use of suitable personal protective equipment in addition to those control measures.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 5.]

Air monitoring for lead

6.61   (1) If there is a potential for hazardous exposure to airborne lead dust, fumes or mist in a work activity or lead process, the employer must

(a) ensure that air monitoring is conducted using a sampling and analytical method referred to in subsection (2)

(i) during the first shift of the work activity or lead process, and

(ii) as necessary throughout the work activity or lead process to ensure that control measures are effective to prevent or minimize worker exposure to lead dust, fumes or mist, and

(b) keep, for at least 10 years, records of the results of air monitoring conducted under this section.

(2) Acceptable sampling and analytical methods for the purpose of subsection (1) are as follows:

(a) a method detailed in a standard occupational hygiene reference published by

(i) the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, or

(ii) the Occupational Safety and Health Administration;

(b) another method acceptable to the Board.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 6.]

Exceptions to air monitoring requirement

6.61.1   (1) In this section, "equivalent work operations" means work operations closely matching the lead processes, types of materials, products or coatings, work practices, control measures and environmental conditions prevailing in the employer's current work operations.

(2) Despite section 6.61, an employer is not required to monitor the concentration of airborne lead if a qualified person determines that

(a) existing control measures are effective in keeping worker exposure as low as reasonably achievable below the exposure limit, and

(b) the employer

(i) has previously monitored for airborne concentrations of lead during equivalent work operations and there is no reason to believe that the results of the previous monitoring would not continue to apply, or

(ii) has objective air monitoring data that was collected during equivalent work operations through industry surveys or peer-reviewed or scientific studies that use sampling and analytical methods referred to in section 6.61 (2).

(3) An employer must keep, for at least 10 years, a record documenting the following, as applicable:

(a) the previous monitoring data used for the purpose of subsection (2) (b) (i);

(b) the source of the objective air monitoring data, and the data itself, referred to in subsection (2) (b) (ii).

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 7.]

Warning signs

6.62   Warning signs describing the hazards and health consequences of lead exposure and prohibiting the entry of unauthorized workers must be posted at the boundary of any work area where hazardous lead exposures could occur.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 8.]

Personal hygiene

6.63   If exposure to lead dust, fumes or mist or lead compounds results in the contamination of exposed skin or work clothing, the requirements for personal hygiene in sections 5.82 to 5.84 must be met.

[am. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 9.]

Housekeeping

6.64   An employer must ensure

(a) that all surfaces in the work area are kept as free as practicable from accumulations of lead dust, and

(b) that, if vacuuming methods are selected as a control measure, vacuums must be

(i) designed, maintained, tested and used in accordance with

(A) the manufacturer's specifications, or

(B) the instructions of a professional engineer, and

(ii) equipped with an effective HEPA filter on the exhaust.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 10.]

Prohibited cleaning methods

6.65   A person must not use blowers, compressed air, compressed gas or dry sweeping cleaning methods in areas where lead processes are conducted.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 10.]

Instruction and training

6.66   An employer must ensure that a worker who is or may be exposed to lead dust, fumes or mist receives adequate instruction and training in all of the following:

(a) the hazards and health effects of exposure to lead dust, fumes and mist;

(b) the specific nature of the work activity or lead process and the potential routes of lead exposure that may result;

(c) safe work practices and procedures;

(d) the correct operation and use of any required equipment and engineering controls;

(e) the purpose and limitations of personal protective equipment, and the correct selection, fitting, use, care and maintenance of that equipment;

(f) personal hygiene and decontamination procedures;

(g) the purpose and significance of health monitoring;

(h) housekeeping practices as described in section 6.64.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. F, s. 10.]

Health protection

6.67   The employer must develop and implement an effective health protection program, in a manner acceptable to the Board, if a worker is exposed to potentially hazardous levels of lead.

Records

6.68   The employer must

(a) maintain records of risk assessments, worker exposures and worker training, and

(b) ensure that health monitoring records are maintained in a manner acceptable to the Board.

Primary lead smelters

6.69   An employer engaged in primary lead smelting is exempt from the requirement to maintain airborne lead concentrations at or below the exposure limit in lead processing areas, provided that in these areas the employer

(a) maintains the airborne lead concentrations as low as is reasonably achievable using the best available technology,

(b) establishes and maintains an acceptable health protection plan including the elements in section 5.54, to ensure that workers' blood lead levels are minimized,

(c) establishes provisions acceptable to the Board for the medical removal of workers, and

(d) submits a summary of the annual review to the Board.

Pesticides

Definitions

6.70   In sections 6.70 to 6.109:

"antisapstain" in reference to a pesticide, means any substance which is applied to freshly cut wood to control fungal growth;

"closed system" means a device and procedure for transferring a pesticide from one container to another in a manner that does not expose the operator to the pesticide;

"field" means any area, excluding a body of water, on or in which one or more crops are grown and includes but is not limited to a field of row crops, an orchard, a mushroom farm, a greenhouse, a nursery, a turf farm, a silviculture area and any similar area;

"fumigant" means a pesticide applied in the form of a gas or vapour to kill pests and which is typically applied in an enclosed space;

"pest" means an injurious, noxious or troublesome insect, fungus, weed, rodent, parasite or other organism;

"pesticide" means a micro-organism or material that is represented, sold, used or intended to be used to prevent, destroy, repel or mitigate a pest and includes

(a) a plant growth regulator, plant defoliator or plant desiccant, and

(b) a control product, other than a device, under the Pest Control Products Act (Canada);

"restricted entry interval" means the length of time representing a period of precaution that must elapse after the application of a pesticide, before an unprotected worker may be authorized to enter the treated portion of a building, structure, or field to which the pesticide has been applied;

"slightly toxic", "moderately toxic" or "very toxic" means, in reference to a pesticide, one containing active ingredients which have acute mammalian toxicities determined by an authority acceptable to the Board, expressed as the Lethal Dose 50% (LD50) by oral or dermal routes of entry as follows:

CategoryOral LD50Dermal LD50
Very toxic0-50 mg/kg0-200 mg/kg
Moderately toxicover 50-500 mg/kgover 200-1 000 mg/kg
Slightly toxicover 500 mg/kgover 1 000 mg/kg

and where the lowest LD50 by the oral or dermal route of entry determines the category of the pesticide, and if the LD50 is reported as a range, the lowest reported LD50 is used.

Application

6.71   Sections 6.72 to 6.109 apply to any workplace where pesticides are used, stored or handled, except for disinfectants, germicidal products, cleaners, antifouling paints and first aid treatments which are issued Pest Control Product numbers.

General Requirements

Pesticide labels

6.72   The employer must ensure that a pesticide for use in the workplace has been registered and labelled by the manufacturer in accordance with the Pest Control Products Act (Canada).

[en. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 44.]

Labels and signs for treated materials

6.73   If pesticide residues on treated seedlots, plants and similar materials supplied for planting may pose a hazard to workers, the employer must ensure labels, placards or signs are provided with the treated materials stating

(a) the pesticides applied,

(b) the date of last application, and

(c) the hazards and precautions required for handling these materials.

Pesticide use

6.74   The employer must ensure that a pesticide for use in the workplace is used in accordance with the requirements stated on the label and with good application practice.

[en. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 46.]

SDS

6.75   The employer must make readily available to workers an SDS or its written equivalent for all pesticides used at the workplace.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 45; 30/2015, s. 30.]

Informing workers

6.76   The employer must ensure that workers occupying a building or structure where a pesticide is to be applied are informed of

(a) the intent to use the pesticide,

(b) the hazards associated with its use, and

(c) the precautions required during the operations.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 45.]

Mixing, Loading and Applying Pesticides

Qualifications

6.77   (1) The employer must ensure that a worker or applicator who mixes, loads or applies a moderately or very toxic pesticide for use in a workplace or who cleans or maintains equipment used in the operations

(a) is 16 years of age or over, and

(b) holds a valid pesticide applicator certificate issued under the Integrated Pest Management Act.

(2) Subsection (1) (b) does not apply to the use of biocides and slimicides in pulp and paper operations, or to antisapstain materials.

(3) Workers involved in training for the purposes of obtaining a valid pesticide applicator certificate who are directly supervised by a qualified person are exempt from the requirement of subsection (1) (b) during the training period.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. C, s. 1.]

Procedures

6.78   The employer must develop and implement written safe work procedures for the

(a) handling, mixing, storage and application of pesticides,

(b) cleanup and disposal of spilled pesticides, and

(c) summoning of first aid and medical assistance for workers overexposed to pesticides.

Health protection

6.79   Where, in the opinion of the Board, it is necessary to provide health monitoring for workers exposed to pesticides, employers and workers must participate as required by the Board, and records must be maintained in a manner acceptable to the Board.

Rescue

6.80   If a worker applies a moderately or very toxic pesticide in a greenhouse or similar enclosed space and the worker may be incapacitated during the application, the work must be done in such a manner that a rescue can be effected by another worker equipped and able to do so.

Equipment

General requirements

6.81   The employer must ensure that equipment used to mix, load or apply pesticides is

(a) constructed of materials which are chemically compatible with the pesticide in use if contact with the pesticide is likely to occur,

(b) operated only by trained persons,

(c) used in accordance with instructions from the pesticide supplier,

(d) maintained in a safe operating condition,

(e) cleaned, repaired and maintained by workers who have been adequately instructed in safe work procedures, and

(f) in a safe condition before maintenance or repair work is carried out, including welding operations.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. F, s. 1.]

Fixed stations

6.82   A fixed pesticide mixing, loading or application station must have

(a) openings on tanks secured as necessary to prevent accidental worker entry,

(b) shut-off devices at the discharge end of hoses and pipes leading from mixing tanks, and

(c) when required by the Board, a closed system for the mixing, loading or transferring of pesticides.

Mobile equipment

6.83   A tank, with a capacity of 200 litres (44 imp gal) or more, on mobile pesticide application equipment must have

(a) a device which indicates the fluid level, for equipment sold for first use after January 1, 1999,

(b) the openings secured to prevent spillage while the equipment is in use, and

(c) shut-off devices at the discharge end of hoses and pipes leading from the mixing tanks.

Pesticide Application

Safe application practice

6.84   (1) The employer must ensure that a pesticide is applied in a manner that controls the risk of adverse health effect or injury to any person.

(2) Before a pesticide is applied, the employer must ensure that all workers in the area that is to be treated and who are not required for the application of pesticides are moved to a safe location.

(3) If practicable, the employer must schedule a pesticide application in a building for a time when the building is unoccupied.

Posting warning signs

6.85   Before a moderately or very toxic pesticide or a fumigant is applied the employer must ensure that

(a) warning signs acceptable to the Board are conspicuously posted at normal points of worker entry to the area to be treated, and

(b) if a pesticide is applied in an enclosed space all entrances to the space are secured to prevent unauthorized persons from entering.

Design of warning signs

6.86   Warning signs must be of a design, construction and durability to be clearly identifiable for the prescribed posting period, and must provide information in a manner that can be readily understood by workers.

Warning signs for non-fumigants

6.87   Warning signs for the application of moderately and very toxic pesticides, other than fumigants in enclosed spaces, must display

(a) a skull and crossbones symbol,

(b) the word WARNING in a language that can be readily understood by the workers and in letters large enough to be read at a distance of 8 m (25 ft),

(c) the name of the pesticide and the date of application,

(d) the expiry date of the restricted entry interval as determined in section 6.89, and

(e) instructions to obtain permission to enter before the expiry date of the restricted entry interval.

Warning signs for fumigants

6.88   The warning sign for the application of a fumigant in an enclosed space must display

(a) a skull and crossbones symbol,

(b) the words DANGER, DEADLY FUMIGANT GAS, KEEP OUT in a language that can be readily understood by the workers and in letters large enough to be read at a distance of 8 m (25 ft),

(c) the name of the fumigant,

(d) the name of the applicator, and

(e) emergency telephone numbers for both day and night.

Restricted entry intervals

6.89   (1) Except where entry is permitted by section 6.90 or 6.91, the employer must ensure that a person does not enter a workplace or portion of a workplace where a pesticide has been applied, until the restricted entry interval has elapsed.

(2) The length of the restricted entry interval required by subsection (1) is a minimum of

(a) 24 hours for a pesticide which is classified as slightly toxic,

(b) 48 hours for a pesticide which is classified as moderately or very toxic, and for any mixture in which a moderately or very toxic pesticide is present, or

(c) the interval specified on a pesticide label if that interval is longer than the interval determined in paragraphs (a) or (b).

Authorization to enter

6.90   (1) If, before the expiry of the restricted entry interval, the employer authorizes a worker to enter a field, building or structure in which a pesticide has been applied the employer must ensure that

(a) the hazards to workers have been assessed by a qualified person,

(b) the worker is provided with and wears the proper personal protective clothing and equipment required by this Regulation, and

(c) the worker follows proper procedures.

(2) If the employer authorizes a worker to enter a building or structure in which a pesticide has been applied, the employer must ensure that

(a) where practicable, the treated area of the building is ventilated and the atmosphere has been tested or otherwise evaluated by a qualified person and declared safe to enter, and

(b) if a worker may be incapacitated after re-entry, provision has been made for rescue in a manner that meet the requirements of section 6.80.

Exemptions

6.91   (1) In a structural pesticide application, the employer is exempt from sections 6.85 to 6.90 when small quantities of slightly toxic pesticides are applied in a manner that minimizes the release of aerosols and residues on work surfaces, or moderately toxic pesticides are safely applied in restricted exposure applications such as crack and crevice treatments provided that

(a) areas treated with these pesticides are clearly identified to workers,

(b) the treated indoor space has been adequately ventilated,

(c) safe work procedures are used, including applicable restricted entry intervals stated on pesticide labels or provided by an authority acceptable to the Board,

(d) a hazardous accidental release does not occur during the application, and

(e) a qualified person inspects the area following application to determine that paragraphs (a) to (d) have been complied with and notifies the employer of the applicable restricted entry intervals and any additional entry precautions, and the employer implements the instructions of the qualified person.

(2) For a system used to handle and apply biocides and slimicides, the employer is exempt from the requirements of sections 6.85 to 6.90 with respect to warning signs and restricted entry intervals, provided that

(a) the system minimizes the release of aerosols and residues on work surfaces,

(b) areas where these pesticides are handled or used are identified to workers, and

(c) entry into these work areas is restricted to authorized workers.

Cleanup of residues

6.92   The employer must ensure that surfaces used for food preparation and eating, and work surfaces likely to come in contact with workers' unprotected skin are cleaned and free of pesticide residues.

Pesticide drift

6.93   (1) An employer must ensure that all reasonable precautions are taken to prevent the drift or spread of a pesticide from a workplace under the employer's control.

(2) If a pesticide under the control of an employer has drifted or spread to a workplace occupied or used by another employer, the first employer must notify the second of the identity of the pesticide, the nature of its harmful characteristics and the precautions required for the safety of workers.

(3) The employer to whose property a pesticide has drifted or spread must take all reasonable steps to

(a) identify the pesticide and advise any persons who may be exposed to it of the nature of the pesticide, its harmful characteristics and the precautions required for safety, and

(b) ensure that any hazards to persons from exposure to the pesticide are eliminated or controlled.

Records

6.94   The employer must maintain a record of pesticide applications which includes, for each application,

(a) the pesticide used and location of application,

(b) the date and time at which the application was completed,

(c) the date on which workers were allowed to re-enter, and

(d) if applicable, the type of crop treated, rate of application and the number of acres or hectares treated.

Personal Hygiene

Wash and shower facilities

6.95   (1) The employer must supply and maintain adequate wash facilities and, if there is the risk of body contamination, shower facilities as required by section 5.82, to all workers when

(a) mixing, loading or applying pesticides, or handling concentrates or wet-treated lumber,

(b) cleaning, maintaining or handling equipment, materials or surfaces contaminated with pesticide residues, or

(c) entering fields where pesticides have been applied and where contact with pesticide residues may contaminate protective clothing and body areas.

(2) The wash and shower facilities required by subsection (1) must be in close proximity to the places where pesticides are used or handled, but must be separate from food preparation, lunchrooms and eating areas.

Worker cleanup

6.96   A worker must immediately cleanse any body area contaminated with pesticide.

Personal protective clothing and equipment

6.97   If a worker mixes, loads or applies pesticides or if a worker cleans, maintains or handles equipment, materials or surfaces contaminated with pesticide residues, the employer must ensure that

(a) the worker is provided with and wears suitable protective clothing and equipment,

(b) contaminated protective clothing and equipment is stored in a secure place and not used until it is laundered or otherwise cleaned,

(c) if required, adequate facilities or services to launder contaminated protective clothing are available,

(d) at least one change of outer protective clothing for each worker is available at the work site, and

(e) a change room or sheltered place is provided where workers can change clothes and store personal clothing while wearing protective clothing.

Avicides, Predicides, Rodenticides and Insecticidal Baits

Exemption

6.98   Sections 6.80 and 6.85 to 6.91 do not apply where an avicide, predicide, rodenticide or insecticidal bait is used or applied in solid or liquid form, unless the pesticide label specifies otherwise.

Preventive measures

6.99   For a pesticide exempted in section 6.98 the employer must ensure that

(a) adequate measures are taken for the protection of the applicator including the use of safe work procedures, the provision and use of personal protective equipment and the provision of adequate hand washing facilities,

(b) the pesticide is applied, where practicable, in areas not readily accessible to unauthorized persons, and away from areas of normal work activity, and

(c) a worker who is required to enter the area or location where the pesticide has been applied is notified of the location of the pesticide application, the physical description of the pesticide and the device, if any, in which it is placed, and the precautions that must be observed.

Storage

Location

6.100   The employer must ensure that pesticides are not stored in areas where food preparation occurs, in lunchrooms, or in food storage areas.

Storage facilities

6.101   (1) The employer must supply a pesticide storage facility that meets the design criteria stated in the manual Standard Practices for Pesticide Applicators, published by the Workers' Compensation Board of BC, for the storage of bulk or reserve quantities of pesticides.

(2) Factors that must be considered in the facility design include

(a) maintenance of minimal quantities,

(b) compatibility of pesticides,

(c) strength of shelving materials, and

(d) containment of spills.

Retail displays

6.102   The employer must ensure that shelving and retail displays for pesticides are designed to provide safe storage and to minimize the possibility of spills.

Antisapstain Applications

Substitution

6.103   An employer must investigate antisapstain materials and, whenever practicable, substitute an alternate material for a material in use, if

(a) the hazards of the substitute are known, and

(b) the risk to workers is reduced.

Ventilation

6.104   (1) The employer must install and maintain an effective local exhaust ventilation system on all spray box application equipment to contain overspray and control worker exposure to the chemicals.

(2) The employer must ensure that the ventilation system for a spray box provides an inward air flow across the hood face at least equal to the velocity of the lumber on the outfeed conveyor.

Cleaning equipment

6.105   The employer must clean a metal surface of antisapstain material before any welding, burning or cutting operation is done on it.

Excess chemical

6.106   The employer must control the flooding of wood being treated by the use of

(a) mist eliminators,

(b) curtains on the spray box enclosure openings,

(c) regulation of the spray flows, or

(d) other acceptable measures.

Protective clothing

6.107   A worker handling wet treated lumber must remove protective equipment before leaving the restricted work area.

Records

6.108   The employer must keep records and SDSs on all previously used antisapstain materials if a change of chemical has occurred and the equipment or work areas have not been adequately decontaminated, and this information must be readily available to workers.

[am. B.C. Reg. 30/2015, s. 31.]

Exemption

6.109   (1) The requirements of sections 6.85 to 6.91 with respect to warning signs and restricted entry intervals do not apply to the application of antisapstain materials, unless the pesticide label specifies otherwise.

(2) Areas of antisapstain application must be clearly identified to workers.

(3) Entry into work areas where antisapstain materials are handled or applied must be restricted to authorized personnel.

Respirable Crystalline Silica and Rock Dust

Definitions

6.110   (1) In this section and sections 6.111 to 6.112.7:

"abrasive blasting" means the cleaning, smoothing, roughening or removing of a surface or part of a surface by the use of an abrasive that is

(a) comprised of a jet of sand, metal shot, grit, or another material, and

(b) propelled by compressed air or steam, or by a wheel;

"blasting enclosure" means a chamber, barrel, cabinet or a purpose-built structure in which abrasive blasting occurs;

"cleaning of castings" means, in connection with making metal castings,

(a) the freeing of metal castings from adherent sand or another substance containing silica, other than the freeing of metal castings from scale formed during annealing or heat treatment,

(b) the removal of cores from metal castings, and

(c) the smoothing of metal castings where freeing is done;

"control measures" include the measures set out in section 6.112.2;

"dust reduction system" means the following, alone or in combination:

(a) the use of a process or material that prevents the creation of RCS dust;

(b) the use of an enclosure, including a blasting enclosure, to

(i) contain RCS dust, or

(ii) physically separate a worker from a source of RCS dust;

(c) the use of local exhaust ventilation, being a system of ventilation designed to capture and remove process emissions or RCS dust before the emissions or dust escapes into the workplace environment;

(d) the use of wet systems, being

(i) the use of water or another liquid to increase moisture content in material to prevent RCS dust from becoming airborne, or

(ii) the addition of moisture to the air to capture RCS dust particles that are already airborne;

"exposure limit" means the applicable exposure limit as referred to in section 5.48;

"exposure monitoring" means air monitoring conducted in accordance with section 5.53 (4) or 6.112.3;

"RCS dust" means any of the following that can be deposited in the lower gas exchange regions of the lung when inhaled:

(a) respirable crystalline silica;

(b) respirable a-quartz;

(c) respirable cristobalite;

"risk assessment" means a written risk assessment conducted in accordance with section 6.112;

"sandblasting" means an abrasive blasting process that uses silica sand as an abrasive;

"silica flour" means the fine powder produced by the crushing, grinding or ball milling of a siliceous substance;

"silica process" means the following processes, as well as any other process that may result in the release of RCS dust in concentrations likely to exceed the exposure limit:

(a) sandblasting;

(b) cleaning of castings;

(c) abrasive blasting, grinding, sanding or dressing of any surface that contains crystalline silica;

(d) blasting, cutting, crushing, drilling, grinding, milling, scaling, splitting or sieving, or other mechanical pulverizing or shattering, of rock, siliceous stone or gravel;

(e) concrete or asphalt milling, shotcreting, pneumatic drilling, tunnelling or other large-scale mechanical processes that may generate RCS dust;

(f) using heavy equipment or pneumatics to transfer sand, earth, aggregate or other material that contains silica, and associated transport, recycling and disposal operations;

(g) a process in which silica flour is used, including using it as an additive in product manufacturing;

(h) manufacturing, dismantling, demolishing or repairing of concrete, masonry or other material that contains silica;

(i) using power tools or equipment to abrade, cut, grind, core or drill concrete, masonry or other material that contains silica;

"siliceous" means any group of sedimentary rocks that consist largely or almost entirely of silicon dioxide (SiO2), including diatomite.

(2) In this section, a reference to concrete, masonry or other material refers to a hard stone-like building material made

(a) of clay, or

(b) by mixing, with water or another liquid,

(i) cement, or

(ii) a combination of cement, sand, gravel, broken stone or another aggregate.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Application

6.111   Sections 6.112 to 6.112.7 apply to a workplace where a worker is or may be

(a) engaged in a silica process, or

(b) exposed to potentially harmful levels of RCS dust.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Risk assessment

6.112   (1) In this section, "existing monitoring data" means data

(a) gathered under section 5.53 or 6.112.3, or

(b) as described in section 6.112.4 (2) (b).

(2) An employer must not permit workers to engage in a work activity or a silica process that may expose workers to RCS dust unless a risk assessment has first been completed by a qualified person.

(3) The risk assessment must include consideration of all of the following:

(a) the hazards of RCS dust, including the exposure limit;

(b) any information contained on a label or in a safety data sheet provided by a supplier, manufacturer or employer in respect of

(i) the crystalline silica content in the materials to be used in the silica process, and

(ii) the health effects of RCS dust exposure;

(c) the scope, circumstances and nature of the work activity or silica process, including

(i) whether section 5.50 applies, given the length of a shift,

(ii) any changes between shifts in the scope, circumstances or nature of the work activity or silica process, and

(iii) the potential level and duration of exposure to RCS dust during the work activity or while engaging in the silica process;

(d) the effectiveness of existing and planned control measures, as determined through exposure monitoring, to prevent or minimize worker exposure to RCS dust, including with respect to access to the workplace by unprotected workers;

(e) any additional information the employer needs to complete the risk assessment.

(4) A qualified person may rely on existing monitoring data for the purpose of assessing control measures under subsection (3) (d) only if it is reasonable to do so based on

(a) the relevance of the existing monitoring data, and

(b) whether additional air monitoring may be needed to reassess the effectiveness of existing and planned control measures because of changes in personnel or to the scope, circumstances or nature of the work activity or silica process.

(5) An employer must ensure that the risk assessment is reviewed by a qualified person if any of the following occur:

(a) there is reason to believe the risk assessment is no longer valid;

(b) there has been a significant change in the scope, nature or circumstances of the work activity or silica process to which the risk assessment relates;

(c) the results of any exposure monitoring show it to be necessary.

(6) If changes to the risk assessment are necessary as a result of the review under subsection (5), the employer must ensure that the risk assessment is changed accordingly.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Exposure control plan

6.112.1   (1) If a risk assessment indicates that a worker is or may be exposed to RCS dust, the employer must

(a) ensure that a qualified person develops an exposure control plan meeting the requirements of sections 5.54 and 5.57 (2), and of subsection (3) of this section, and

(b) implement the exposure control plan.

(2) If a risk assessment is changed under section 6.112 (6), the employer must ensure that

(a) the exposure control plan is amended to address the changes to the risk assessment, and

(b) the amendments to the exposure control plan are implemented.

(3) For the purposes of section 5.54 (2) (d), the written work procedures within an exposure control plan must address at least the following:

(a) the containment of silica processes, if used as a control measure;

(b) the effective control of worker exposure to RCS dust using dust reduction systems;

(c) safe work practices and procedures;

(d) the correct selection, use, care and maintenance of any required personal protective equipment and clothing;

(e) emergency procedures;

(f) the removal, cleanup and disposal of RCS dust and debris, including the measures that will be used for the purposes of meeting the requirements of section 6.112.6.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Elimination or control of exposure

6.112.2   (1) An employer must, to the extent practicable, avoid the use of products or materials containing crystalline silica by replacing them with substances or processes that, under normal conditions of use, eliminate the risk of worker exposure to RCS dust.

(2) If it is not practicable to eliminate the risk of worker exposure to RCS dust, the employer must control the risk below the applicable exposure limit under section 5.48 by applying control measures that

(a) are appropriate to the work activity,

(b) are consistent with the risk assessment and with sections 5.55 and 5.57, and

(c) include, in order of priority,

(i) the design and use of engineering controls, including appropriate dust reduction systems, containment of silica processes, and the provision and use of suitable work equipment and materials,

(ii) the control of RCS dust exposure through administrative controls, including work practice controls, and

(iii) if the control measures set out in paragraphs (i) and (ii) are not adequate to control exposure, the provision and use of suitable personal protective equipment in addition to those control measures.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Air monitoring for RCS dust

6.112.3   (1) If there is a potential for hazardous exposure to RCS dust in a work activity or silica process, the employer must

(a) ensure that air monitoring is conducted using a sampling and analytical method referred to in subsection (2)

(i) during the first shift of the work activity or silica process, and

(ii) as necessary throughout the work activity or silica process to ensure that control measures are effective to prevent or minimize worker exposure to RCS dust, and

(b) keep, for at least 10 years, records of the results of air monitoring conducted under this section.

(2) Acceptable sampling and analytical methods for the purpose of subsection (1) are as follows:

(a) a method detailed in a standard occupational hygiene reference published by

(i) the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, or

(ii) the Occupational Safety and Health Administration;

(b) another method acceptable to the Board.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Exceptions to monitoring requirement

6.112.4   (1) In this section, "equivalent work operations" means work operations closely matching the silica processes, types of materials, work practices, control measures and environmental conditions prevailing in the employer's current work operations.

(2) Despite section 6.112.3, an employer is not required to monitor the exposure of workers to RCS dust if a qualified person determines that

(a) existing control measures are effective in keeping worker exposure as low as reasonably achievable below the exposure limit, and

(b) the employer

(i) has previously monitored for RCS dust exposure during equivalent work operations and there is no reason to believe that the results of the previous monitoring would not continue to apply, or

(ii) has objective air monitoring data that was collected during equivalent work operations through industry surveys or peer-reviewed or scientific studies that use sampling and analytical methods referred to in section 6.112.3 (2).

(3) An employer must keep, for at least 10 years, a record documenting the following, as applicable:

(a) the previous monitoring data used for the purpose of subsection (2) (b) (i);

(b) the source of the objective air monitoring data, and the data itself, referred to in subsection (2) (b) (ii).

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Blasting enclosures

6.112.5   An employer must ensure that a blasting enclosure is used for the following activities only:

(a) abrasive blasting;

(b) maintenance of the blasting enclosure and all associated equipment, including ventilation and blasting equipment.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Housekeeping

6.112.6   (1) In addition to the requirements of section 5.82 (2), an employer must ensure that all of the following requirements are met:

(a) all workplaces and work-related areas and equipment where RCS dust may accumulate must be cleaned at the end of every shift, if practicable, using one or a combination of

(i) a vacuum or similar device,

(ii) wet cleanup methods, or

(iii) another method that is effective and in accordance with the safe work practices contained in the exposure control plan;

(b) if a vacuum or similar device is used, the vacuum or device must be

(i) designed, maintained, tested and used in accordance with

(A) the manufacturer's specifications, or

(B) the instructions of a professional engineer, and

(ii) equipped with an effective HEPA filter on the exhaust;

(c) if wet cleanup methods are used, any slurry generated by those methods must be removed when the work is completed in such as manner as to avoid a secondary RCS dust exposure hazard;

(d) waste material must be placed in sealable containers and promptly disposed of to prevent RCS dust from re-entering the workplace.

(2) An employer must not permit the use of blowers, compressed air, dry sweeping or dry mopping to clean up or remove RCS dust.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Instruction and training

6.112.7   An employer must ensure that a worker who is or may be exposed to RCS dust receives adequate instruction and training in all of the following:

(a) the hazards and health effects of inhaling RCS dust;

(b) safe work practices and procedures;

(c) the correct operation and use of any required equipment and engineering controls;

(d) the purpose and limitations of personal protective equipment, and the correct selection, fitting, use, care and maintenance of that equipment;

(e) housekeeping practices as described in section 6.112.6.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 2.]

Rock drills

6.113   A rock drill, other than a manually-powered rock drill, must be equipped with a dust suppression system, acceptable to the Board, that

(a) uses water jet, spray, or other equally effective means to suppress drilling dust effectively, and

(b) operates whenever the drill is in use.

Crushing plants

6.114   Crushing plants must be equipped with the following dust controls:

(a) crushers, including jaw, roll, cone, or hammer-mills must have an effective mechanical exhaust system;

(b) screens releasing dust must be partially covered and have an effective mechanical exhaust system or an effective water spray system;

(c) the screen discharge hopper must be enclosed and if dust is released must have an effective mechanical exhaust system or an effective water spray system;

(d) material transfer points releasing dust must have an effective mechanical exhaust system or an effective water spray system;

(e) a suitable dust collector must be installed on a mechanical exhaust system;

(f) dust discharged from a mechanical exhaust ventilation system must not be recirculated into work areas;

(g) when practicable, the operator must be enclosed in a pressurized cab equipped with air filtration and noise suppression.

[am. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 3.]

Asphalt mixing plants

6.115   Asphalt mixing plants must be equipped with the following dust controls:

(a) a dust-tight seal must be installed at the dryer discharge to the hot stone elevator;

(b) the screen enclosure must have a mechanical exhaust system that maintains a negative pressure within the screen enclosure and the elevator feed system;

(c) the mixing chamber must have a mechanical exhaust system that maintains a negative pressure on the bin discharge to the mixer or elevator feed system;

(d) on continuous-mix plants the conveyor feeding the mixing chamber must be enclosed and connected to the mechanical exhaust system;

(e) the screen overflow chutes and hoppers handling screen overflow must be enclosed, and the waste fines conveyor system must be enclosed at all material transfer and discharge points;

(f) the discharge of overflow or waste fines material must be to an enclosed container, which must be emptied in a manner that prevents contamination of the work area;

(g) material transfer points between sections of the asphalt mixing plant must be fitted with effective dust seals;

(h) conveyor and elevator cover seals must be dust-tight;

(i) on batch-mix plants, dust-tight seals must be installed on manual draw chute levers and on the weigh-hopper and bin;

(j) a suitable dust collector must be installed on the mechanical exhaust system, with the discharge from the dust collector located so as to prevent the recirculation of contaminated air to areas occupied by workers.

Application of RCS dust provisions

6.115.1   For greater certainty, in respect of a workplace described in section 6.111, the requirements set out in sections 6.113 to 6.115 are in addition to the requirements set out in sections 6.112 to 6.112.7.

[en. B.C. Reg. 9/2017, App. G, s. 4.]

Toxic Process Gases

Definitions

6.116   In sections 6.117 to 6.132:

"enclosure" means a room, cabinet or separation designed to contain equipment, machinery and vessels and to isolate accidental releases of toxic gas;

"toxic process gas" means a gas which

(a) meets the HPR Health Hazard Class — Acute Toxicity, Categories 1, 2 and 3 or the categories set out in the following table:

HPR Health Hazard
Classes
Hazard Categories
Skin corrosion / irritation1A1B1C2
Serious eye damage / irritation12A2B
Respiratory or skin sensitization1A1B
Mutagenicity1A1B2
Carcinogenicity1A1B2
Reproductive toxicity1A1B2
Specific organ toxicity
(repeated exposure)
12

, and

(b) is used for purposes of

(i) an industrial process in which a precursor is changed into a product,

(ii) refrigeration by means of a piped installation, or

(iii) treatment of materials, for example, in a disinfection system.

[am. B.C. Regs. 253/2001, s. 4; 30/2015, s. 32.]

Application

6.117   Sections 6.118 to 6.132 apply to operations in which a toxic process gas is used, but do not apply to the handling or storage of flammable fuel gases or vapours, toxic waste emissions or the use of toxic process gases in manufactured articles.

Risk assessment

6.118   The employer must ensure that a risk assessment is conducted for toxic process gases.

Exposure control plan

6.119   If there is a risk of adverse health effect to workers from exposure to a toxic process gas, based on the risk assessment, the employer must develop and implement an exposure control plan meeting the requirements of section 5.54.

Procedures

6.120   (1) The employer must ensure that written work procedures providing instructions for the safe handling of the toxic process gas are prepared for all hazardous tasks in accordance with the risk assessment results, critical technical information and operations manuals.

(2) The employer must ensure that emergency procedures designed for the safe evacuation and rescue of all workers are established and tested on a regular basis.

(3) The procedures required by subsections (1) and (2) must be readily available to the workers at the workplace.

Education and training

6.121   The employer must ensure that

(a) workers are capable of operating the equipment and machinery in a safe manner by providing effective education and training, and

(b) records of education and training are maintained.

(c) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. F, s. 2 (d).]

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. F, s. 4.]

Enclosure

6.122   Where practicable, the employer must locate equipment and machinery such as tanks and compressors, handling toxic process gases in a separate enclosure that is

(a) designed, constructed and maintained to prevent fugitive emissions and accidental releases from entering occupied work areas,

(b) provided with exhaust ventilation to ensure an effective inward air flow into the enclosure at all times,

(c) provided with a safe means of entry and exit,

(d) designated as a restricted work area limited to entry by authorized personnel, and

(e) posted with signs which clearly identify the hazards and the precautions required for safe entry.

Testing

6.123   The employer must provide a safe means to check and test conditions inside an enclosure before entry by authorized workers.

Ventilation

6.124   The employer must

(a) ensure that ventilation systems are designed to exhaust toxic process gases directly to the outdoors in a safe manner,

(b) ensure that grilles providing makeup air from adjacent occupied areas are equipped with gas-rated, back-draft dampers,

(c) monitor critical parts of the ventilation systems, such as fan, motor and air flow, to ensure that workers are alerted to a malfunction of the system,

(d) ensure that ventilation ducting is vapour proof, dedicated and resistant to corrosion by the gas it carries, and

(e) where practicable, locate the fans on the outside of the building or structure to maintain the duct work within occupied work areas under a negative pressure differential.

Emergency ventilation

6.125   The employer must provide emergency ventilation that can be safely activated in emergency situations to ensure containment and control of an accidental release of a toxic process gas.

Shut-down device

6.126   (1) In the event of an emergency or accidental release, the employer must ensure that

(a) the gas supply can be shut down manually from a remote location or by the alarm system so as to isolate the reserve supply within the system and stop the generation or flow of the gas, or

(b) if the control measures required by paragraph (a) are not practicable, other effective measures, acceptable to the Board, are implemented to protect workers and other persons from exposure to the gas.

(2) When an automated or remote shut-down device is activated, the employer must ensure that operators are alerted to the emergency shut-down of the system.

[en. B.C. Reg. 381/2004, s. 2.]

Personal protective equipment

6.127   (1) The employer must provide appropriate personal protective equipment and ensure that workers wear it.

(2) A worker performing a hazardous work procedure on equipment or machinery where there is the risk of toxic process gas being released directly into the breathing zone, such as cylinder changing, system or line purging or draining, and leak detection and repair, must wear an appropriate respirator.

(3) A worker entering a restricted access enclosure must wear or carry an escape respirator.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. G, s. 4.]

Monitors and alarms

6.128   (1) Where practicable, the employer must install continuous monitoring systems that detect fugitive emissions and accidental releases and effectively determine work conditions within the restricted access area.

(2) Continuous monitors must be connected to alarm systems to adequately warn workers of hazardous conditions and, when practicable, must be designed to safely activate appropriate control measures when emergency situations are detected.

(3) Monitoring and alarm systems must be

(a) tested at least monthly for proper operation, and

(b) calibrated at least annually,

by authorized personnel using procedures set out in section 4.3 (2) or other procedures acceptable to the Board.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. B, s. 8; 188/2011, App. M, s. 2.]

Pressure relief alarm systems

6.129   (1) The employer must ensure that all pressure relief valves or similar safety-release devices direct relief gases to the outdoors in a safe manner.

(2) The employer must ensure that an alarm or any other reporting system designed to inform the operators of a malfunction or emergency activates if a pressure relief safety device is engaged.

Identification of controls

6.130   The employer must ensure that

(a) all critical components of equipment and machinery handling toxic process gases are clearly identified, and

(b) the function of every control device can be readily determined.

Piping systems

6.131   (1) The employer must ensure that a piping system is

(a) constructed of compatible materials resistant to corrosion by the gas it carries,

(b) constructed to withstand the system pressures to which it will be subjected, and

(c) safely routed, supported and protected from impact damage, shock and vibration.

(2) The employer must ensure that piping and valve systems are leak and pressure tested, as required, before the system is put into operation.

(3) The employer must ensure that piping systems are equipped with isolation, pressure venting or bleed valves designed to purge the lines safely of residual gases before maintenance or servicing procedures.

Maintenance

6.132   The employer must ensure that the servicing and maintenance of equipment and machinery addresses all critical components.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 9.]

Part 7 — Noise, Vibration, Radiation and Temperature

Division 1 — Noise Exposure

Definition

7.1   (1) In this Division, "noise exposure limits" means either of the noise exposure limits established under section 7.2.

(2) Noise terminology and measurements used or described in this Division have the same meaning that they have in

(a) CSA Standard Z107.56-94, Procedures for the Measurement of Occupational Noise Exposure, as amended from time to time, and

(b) ANSI Standard S1.25-1991, Specification for Personal Noise Dosimeters, as amended from time to time.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Noise exposure limits

7.2   An employer must ensure that a worker is not exposed to noise levels above either of the following exposure limits:

(a) 85 dBA Lex daily noise exposure level;

(b) 140 dBC peak sound level.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Noise measurement required

7.3   (1) If a worker is or may be exposed to potentially harmful levels of noise, or if information indicates that a worker may be exposed to a level exceeding 82 dBA Lex, the employer must measure the noise exposure.

(2) The noise exposure measurement must

(a) be performed in accordance with CSA Standard Z107.56-94, Procedures for the Measurement of Occupational Noise Exposure, as amended from time to time, except as otherwise determined by the Board, and

(b) be updated if a change in equipment or process affects the noise level or the duration of noise exposure.

(3) Except as otherwise determined by the Board, noise dosimeters and sound level meters used for measuring noise exposure must meet the requirements of ANSI Standard S1.25-1991, Specification for Personal Noise Dosimeters, as amended from time to time.

(4) The employer must inform affected workers of the results of any noise exposure measurement and the significance of the measurement to risk of hearing loss.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Exemption

7.4   An employer is not required to measure the noise exposure of a worker if

(a) based on other information, the employer identifies the worker as being exposed to noise in excess of an exposure limit, and

(b) the employer establishes an effective noise control and hearing conservation program for that worker.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Noise control and hearing conservation program

7.5   If noise in the workplace exceeds either of the noise exposure limits, the employer must develop and implement an effective noise control and hearing conservation program with the following elements:

(a) noise measurement;

(b) education and training;

(c) engineered noise control;

(d) hearing protection;

(e) posting of noise hazard areas;

(f) hearing tests;

(g) annual program review.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Engineered noise control

7.6   If a worker is exposed to noise above a noise exposure limit, the employer must

(a) investigate options for engineered noise control, and

(b) when practicable, implement one or more of those options to reduce noise exposure of workers to or below the exposure limits.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Hearing protection and warning signs

7.7   (1) If it is not practicable to reduce noise levels to or below noise exposure limits, the employer must

(a) reduce noise exposure to the lowest level practicable,

(b) post warning signs in the noise hazard areas,

(c) give to affected workers hearing protection that meets the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.2-02, Hearing Protection Devices — Performance, Selection, Care, and Use, as amended from time to time, except as otherwise determined by the Board, and maintain the hearing protection so that it continues to meet those standards, and

(d) ensure that hearing protection is worn effectively in noise hazard areas.

(2) Workers in a posted noise hazard area must wear hearing protection.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Hearing tests

7.8   (1) The employer must give workers who are exposed to noise that exceeds noise exposure limits

(a) an initial hearing test as soon as practicable after employment starts, but not later than 6 months after the start of employment, and

(b) a test at least once every 12 months after the initial test.

(2) Hearing tests must be administered by a hearing tester authorized by the Board.

(3) The employer must ensure that the authorized hearing tester sends the test results to the Board.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Records to be kept

7.9   The employer must keep records of

(a) the annual hearing test results for each worker, which must

(i) be kept as long as the worker is employed by the employer, and

(ii) be kept confidential and not released to anyone without the written permission of the worker, or as otherwise required by law,

(b) the education and training provided to workers, and

(c) the results of noise exposure measurements taken under section 7.3.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Division 2 — Vibration Exposure

Definitions

7.10   In this Division:

"hand-arm vibration" means vibration that is transmitted from vibrating surfaces of objects, such as hand tools, through the hands and arms;

"vibration exposure limits" means the limits referred to in section 7.11;

"whole-body vibration" means vibration that is transmitted to a worker's body from vibrating surfaces on which a worker stands or sits.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Vibration exposure limits

7.11   An employer must ensure, to the extent practicable, that workers are not exposed to vibration in excess of the limits specified in

(a) for hand-arm vibration, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists publication entitled Threshold Limit Values and Biological Exposure Indices, dated 2003, as amended from time to time;

(b) for whole-body vibration, ANSI Standard S3.18-2002/ISO 2631-1-1997, Mechanical Vibration and Shock — Evaluation of Human Exposure to Whole Body Vibration — Part 1: General Requirements, as amended from time to time;

except as otherwise determined by the Board.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Evaluation of vibration

7.12   The evaluation of hand-arm vibration and whole-body vibration must be conducted by the employer in accordance with

(a) for hand-arm vibration, ISO Standard 5349-1:2001, Mechanical Vibration — Measurement and Evaluation of Human Exposure to Hand-transmitted Vibration — Part 1: General Requirements and ISO Standard 5349-2:2001, Mechanical Vibration — Measurement and Evaluation of Human Exposure to Hand-transmitted Vibration — Part 2: Practical Guidance for Measurement at the Workplace, as amended from time to time;

(b) for whole-body vibration, ANSI Standard S3.18-2002/1SO 2631-1-1997, Mechanical Vibration and Shock — Evaluation of Human Exposure to the Whole Body Vibration — Part 1: General Requirements, as amended from time to time;

except as otherwise determined by the Board.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Vibration exposure control obligations

7.13   The employer must, if a worker is or may be exposed to vibration in excess of the vibration exposure limits, develop and implement an exposure control plan that meets the requirements of section 5.54 (2).

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Information about vibration hazards

7.14   The employer must, if a worker is exposed to levels of vibration above the vibration exposure limits, inform the worker of the nature of the hazard and possible adverse effects.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Labels

7.15   If the manufacturer of equipment that produces levels of vibration in excess of the vibration exposure limits does not label the equipment to identify the hazard, the employer is responsible for doing so.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Exposure to cold and hand-arm vibration

7.16   When a worker is exposed to hand-arm vibration, the employer, to the extent practicable, must ensure that the worker's hands or arms are not exposed to cold, either

(a) from the environment in which the worker is working or as a result of using equipment, or

(b) from coming into contact with cold objects.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Division 3 — Radiation Exposure

Definitions

7.17   In this Division:

"action level, ionizing radiation" means an effective dose of 1 milliSievert (mSv) per year;

"action level, non-ionizing radiation" means the exposure limits for the general public referred to in section 7.19 (4) or, if no public limit is referred to, it means the maximum exposure limit for workers referred to in section 7.19 (4);

"effective dose" means the amount of ionizing radiation, measured in mSv, absorbed by the worker's whole body, adjusted for the energy level and type of radiation and the differing susceptibilities of the organs and tissues irradiated, and if only part of the body is exposed the effective dose is the sum of the weighted equivalent doses in all irradiated tissues and organs;

"equivalent dose" means the amount of ionizing radiation, measured in mSv, absorbed by a specific body part and adjusted for the energy level and type of radiation.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Application

7.18   (1) This Division applies to all sources of ultrasonic energy, non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, including radiation sources governed by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (Canada), except as otherwise determined by the Board.

(2) This Division does not apply to medical or dental radiation received by a patient, or to natural background radiation, except as specified by the Board.

[en. B.C. Reg. 382/2004.]

Exposure limits

7.19   (1) A worker's exposure to ionizing radiation must not exceed any of the following:

(a) an annual effective dose of 20 mSv;

(b) an annual equivalent dose of

(i) 150 mSv to the lens of the eye,

(ii) 500 mSv to the skin, averaged over any 1 cm2 area at a nominal depth of 7 mg/cm2, regardless of the area exposed, or